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commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


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Universal configuration monitoring and system of record for IT.
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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!
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Psst. Open beta.

Wow, didn't really expect you to read this far down. The latest iteration of the site is in open beta. It's a gentle open beta-- not in prime-time just yet. It's being hosted over at UpGuard (link) and you are more than welcome to give it a shot. Couple things:

  • » The open beta is running a copy of the database that will not carry over to the final version. Don't post anything you don't mind losing.
  • » If you wish to use your user account, you will probably need to reset your password.
Your feedback is appreciated via the form on the beta page. Thanks! -Jon & CLFU Team

All commands from sorted by
Terminal - All commands - 12,393 results
zip -r myfile.zip * -x \*.svn\*
rsync -av -e ssh [email protected]:/path/to/file.txt .
2009-01-26 13:39:24
User: root
Functions: rsync
1

You will be prompted for a password unless you have your public keys set-up.

^foo^bar
2009-01-26 13:25:37
User: root
528

Really useful for when you have a typo in a previous command. Also, arguments default to empty so if you accidentally run:

echo "no typozs"

you can correct it with

^z
cp file.txt{,.bak}
2009-01-26 12:11:29
User: root
Functions: cp
38

Uses shell expansion to create a back-up called file.txt.bak

grep -o "\(new \(\w\+\)\|\w\+::\)" file.php | sed 's/new \|:://' | sort | uniq -c | sort
2009-01-26 12:08:47
User: root
Functions: grep sed sort uniq
-2

This grabs all lines that make an instantation or static call, then filters out the cruft and displays a summary of each class called and the frequency.

sed '1000000!d;q' < massive-log-file.log
2009-01-26 11:50:00
User: root
Functions: sed
21

Sed stops parsing at the match and so is much more effecient than piping head into tail or similar. Grab a line range using

sed '999995,1000005!d' < my_massive_file
find /path/to/dir -type f -print0 | xargs -0 rm
2009-01-26 11:30:47
User: root
Functions: find xargs
12

Using xargs is better than:

find /path/to/dir -type f -exec rm \-f {} \;

as the -exec switch uses a separate process for each remove. xargs splits the streamed files into more managable subsets so less processes are required.

find . -name "*.php" -exec grep \-H "new filter_" {} \;
2009-01-26 10:43:09
User: root
Functions: find grep
0

This greps all PHP files for a given classname and displays both the file and the usage.

sudo !!
2009-01-26 10:26:48
User: root
1134

Useful when you forget to use sudo for a command. "!!" grabs the last run command.

alias cr='find . 2>/dev/null -regex '\''.*\.\(c\|cpp\|pc\|h\|hpp\|cc\)$'\'' | xargs grep --color=always -ni -C2'
2009-01-26 08:54:25
User: chrisdrew
Functions: alias grep xargs
0

Creates a command alias ('cr' in the above example) that searches the contents of files matching a set of file extensions (C & C++ source-code in the above example) recursively within the current directory. Search configured to be in colour, ignore-case, show line numbers and show 4 lines of context. Put in shell initialisation file of your choice. Trivially easy to use, e.g:

cr sha1_init
du | sort -gr > file_sizes
2009-01-26 01:12:54
User: chrisdrew
Functions: du sort
6

Recursively searches current directory and outputs sorted list of each directory's disk usage to a text file.

watch "df | grep /path/to/drive"
2009-01-25 21:16:41
User: root
4

This can be useful when a large remove operation is taking place.

echo "ls -l" | at midnight
2009-01-25 21:07:42
User: root
Functions: at echo
241

This is an alternative to cron which allows a one-off task to be scheduled for a certain time.

tail -10000 access_log | awk '{print $1}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n | tail
2009-01-25 21:01:52
User: root
Functions: awk sort tail uniq
22

This uses awk to grab the IP address from each request and then sorts and summarises the top 10.

find . \( -name "*.php" -o -name "*.js" \) -exec svn propset svn:keywords Id {} \;
find . -type f | wc -l
ps aux | sort -nk +4 | tail
2009-01-23 17:12:33
User: root
Functions: ps sort
99

ps returns all running processes which are then sorted by the 4th field in numerical order and the top 10 are sent to STDOUT.

myisamchk /path/to/mysql/files/*.MYI
2009-01-22 10:20:00
User: root
0

See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/myisamchk.html for further details. You can also repair all tables by running:

myisamchk -r *.MYI