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Terminal - All commands - 11,926 results
function encode4phone() { ffmpeg -acodec libamr_nb -vcodec h263 -i "$1" -s qcif -b 200k -ac 1 -ab 7.4k -ar 8000 "$1.3gp" }
grep --color=auto -iRnH "$search_word" $directory
2009-02-21 19:16:33
User: tobiasboon
Functions: grep
12

greps for search word in directory and below (defaults to cd).

-i case insensitive

-n shows line number

-H shows file name

FILE="`date +%m%d%H%M%S`.png"; URL="http://YOUR_HOST/YOUR/PATH/$FILE"; TMP="/tmp/$FILE"; import -frame $TMP; scp $TMP YOUR-USER@YOUR-HOST:/YOUR/PATH/; rm $TMP; firefox "$URL"
2009-02-21 18:42:33
User: TheBunman
Functions: rm scp
2

I often need to send screenshots to other people to explain settings and whatever.

So I created this oneline which I use to create the screenshot with imagemagik, upload it via scp to my server and then the command opens an firefox tab with the screenshot.

The screenshot can be a region or a window.

You just have to replace the parts beginning with YOUR.

date -d '2 weeks ago Saturday' +%Y-%m-%d
2009-02-21 16:42:52
User: NPH
Functions: date
15

Good for automating reports that need to run from between two dates.

sed -e "s/| /\n/g" ~/.bash_history | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr | head
ssh -A user@somehost
2009-02-21 16:01:36
User: f4nt
Functions: ssh
6

the -A argument forwards your ssh private keys to the host you're going to. Useful in some scenarios where you have to hop to one server, and then login to another using a private key.

find /path/to/files -type f -mtime +7 | grep -v \.gz | xargs gzip
echo -en "stats\r\n" "quit\r\n" | nc localhost 11211 | tr -s [:cntrl:] " "| cut -f42,48 -d" " | sed "s/\([0-9]*\)\s\([0-9]*\)/ \2\/\1*100/" | bc -l
for x in `psql -e\l | awk '{print $1}'| egrep -v "(^List|^Name|\-\-\-\-\-|^\()"`; do pg_dump -C $x | gzip > /var/lib/pgsql/backups/$x-nightly.dmp.gz; done
2009-02-21 15:21:09
User: f4nt
Functions: awk egrep gzip
1

Ran as the postgres user, dumps each database individually. It dumps with the create statements as well, so you can just 'zcat $x-nightly.dmp.gz | psql' to reimport/recreate a database from a backup.

find . -type f -mtime +7 -exec ls -l {} \;
2009-02-21 08:03:24
User: senses0
Functions: find ls
5

Find files that are older than x days in the working directory and list them. This will recurse all the sub-directories inside the working directory.

By changing the value for -mtime, you can adjust the time and by replacing the ls command with, say, rm, you can remove those files if you wish to.

N="filepath" ; P=/proc/$(lsof +L1 | grep "$N" | awk '{print $2}')/fd ; ls -l $P | sed -rn "/$N/s/.*([0-9]+) ->.*/\1/p" | xargs -I_ cat $P/_ > "$N"
2009-02-21 02:31:24
User: laburu
Functions: awk cat grep ls sed xargs
5

Note that the file at the given path will have the contents of the (still) deleted file, but it is a new file with a new node number; in other words, this restores the data, but it does not actually "undelete" the old file.

I posted a function declaration encapsulating this functionality to http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/7yx6f/how_to_undelete_any_open_deleted_file_in_linux/c07sqwe (please excuse the crap formatting).

doloop() { DONT=/tmp/do-run-run-run; while true; do touch $DONT; (sleep 30; rm $DONT;) & $1 ; if [ -e $DONT ]; then echo restarting too fast; return ; fi ; done }
2009-02-21 02:11:18
User: evil_otto
Functions: echo return rm sleep touch
-1

This runs a command continuously, restarting it if it exits. Sort of a poor man's daemontools. Useful for running servers from the command line instead of inittab.

"some line input" | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
for i in `ps aux | grep ssh | grep -v grep | awk {'print $2'}` ; do kill $i; done
a() { alias $1=cd\ $PWD; }
2009-02-21 01:53:01
Functions: alias
0

An easy way to create aliases for moving between many directories

curl -s -u username:passwd http://twitter.com/statuses/friends_timeline.rss|grep title|sed -ne 's/<\/*title>//gp' |festival --tts
alias mine='ps xco pid,command,%cpu,%mem,state'
ssh -t user@some.domain.com /usr/bin/screen -xRR
2009-02-20 23:39:54
User: olifante
Functions: ssh
28

Long before tabbed terminals existed, people have been using Gnu screen to open many shells in a single text terminal. Combined with ssh, it gives you the ability to have many open shells with a single remote connection using the above options. If you detach with "Ctrl-a d" or if the ssh session is accidentally terminated, all processes running in your remote shells remain undisturbed, ready for you to reconnect. Other useful screen commands are "Ctrl-a c" (open new shell) and "Ctrl-a a" (alternate between shells). Read this quick reference for more screen commands: http://aperiodic.net/screen/quick_reference

alias timestamp='date "+%Y%m%dT%H%M%S"'
2009-02-20 23:18:30
User: olifante
Functions: alias
12

I often need to add a timestamp to a file, but I never seem to remember the exact format string that has to be passed to the date command to get a compact datetime string like 20090220T231410 (i.e yyyymmddThhmmss, the ISO 8601 format popular outside the US)

Play "foo.mpg" in your terminal using ASCII characters
2009-02-20 22:12:14
User: chrisclymer
1

mplayer -vo caca will give you a similar result but in color

rpm -qa --queryformat 'Installed on %{INSTALLTIME:date}\t%{NAME}-%{VERSION}-%{RELEASE}: %{SUMMARY}\n'
HOST=127.0.0.1;for((port=1;port<=65535;++port)); do echo -en "$port ";if echo -en "open $HOST $port\nlogout\quit" | telnet 2>/dev/null | grep 'Connected to' > /dev/null; then echo -en "\n\nport $port/tcp is open\n\n";fi;done | grep open
ps auxwww | grep outofcontrolprocess | awk '{print $9}' | xargs kill -9
[[ test_condition ]] && if_true_do_this || otherwise_do_that
2009-02-20 21:45:21
User: stallmer
24

instead of writing:

if [[ "$1" == "$2" ]]; then

echo "$1 is equal $2"

else

echo "$1 differs from $2"

fi

do write:

[[ "$1" == "$2" ]] && echo "$1 is equal $2" || echo "$1 differs from $2"

ps aux | awk '/name/ {print $2}'
2009-02-20 21:35:52
User: evil_otto
Functions: awk ps
-5

This finds a process id by name, but without the extra grep that you usually see. Remember, awk can grep too!