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Terminal - All commands - 12,159 results
fileinfo() { RPMQF=$(rpm -qf $1); RPMQL=$(rpm -ql $RPMQF);echo "man page:";whatis $(basename $1); echo "Services:"; echo -e "$RPMQL\n"|grep -P "\.service";echo "Config files:";rpm -qc $RPMQF;echo "Provided by:" $RPMQF; }
2015-05-11 16:46:01
User: nnsense
Functions: basename echo grep rpm whatis
2

Many times I give the same commands in loop to find informations about a file. I use this as an alias to summarize that informations in a single command. Now with variables! :D

qf2s() { rpm -ql $(rpm -qf $1)|grep -P "\.service"; }
2015-05-11 16:32:16
User: nnsense
Functions: grep rpm
1

I use this as an alias to get all .service files related a single installed file/conf (if it has services, of course).

For rpm based systems ;)

cdls() { if [[ $1 != "" ]] ; then cd $1; ls; else ls; fi };
2015-05-11 15:52:09
User: nnsense
Functions: cd
0

Not really alternative, just giving a different behavior listing current directory if no directory given.

for x in `ls -1`; do $SOMETHING; done
curl -s https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/ | grep -o '[^"]*Linux/7/pdf[^"]*' | xargs -I{} wget https://access.redhat.com{}
2015-05-11 11:57:20
User: SuperFly
Functions: grep wget xargs
0

Let's give Flatcap credit for this elegant solution, instead of leaving it hidden as a comment.

Tested on RHEL6 and it works. Nice and clean.

uudeview +e .zip -i mail.eml
2015-05-11 10:32:49
User: MaxChinni
0

Extract any ".zip" attachment from the e-mail.

du -hs .[^.]* * | sort -h
2015-05-10 12:19:29
User: liminal
Functions: du sort
Tags: du usage disk
2

Same result as with 'du -ks .[^.]* * | sort -n' but with size outputs in human readable format (e.g., 1K 234M 2G)

locate -i /pattern/ | xargs -n1 dirname | sort -u
2015-05-09 21:22:05
User: dardo1982
Functions: dirname locate sort xargs
Tags: find case
0

Uses "locate" instead of "find", "sort -u" instead of "sort | uniq" and it's case insensitive.

perl -pE's/(\S+\s*){0,1}//'
2015-05-09 15:14:58
User: pung96
Functions: perl
1

An advantage is that this doesn't modify remained string at all. One can change {0,1} with {0,n} to drop several columns

echo FileName | perl -nlE'sleep 1 while time-(stat)[10]<10' && echo DONE
2015-05-09 14:58:41
User: pung96
Functions: echo perl
0

perl version of "Wait for file to stop changing"

When "FileName" has not been changed for last 10 seconds, then print "DONE"

"10" in "(stat)[10]" means ctime.

One have other options like atime, mtime and others. http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/stat.html

while [ $(( $(date +%s) - $(stat -c %Y FILENAME) )) -lt 10 ]; do sleep 1; done; echo DONE
2015-05-09 12:30:13
User: flatcap
Functions: date echo sleep stat
3

This loop will finish if a file hasn't changed in the last 10 seconds.

.

It checks the file's modification timestamp against the clock.

If 10 seconds have elapsed without any change to the file, then the loop ends.

.

This script will give a false positive if there's a 10 second delay between updates,

e.g. due to network congestion

.

How does it work?

'date +%s' gives the current time in seconds

'stat -c %Y' gives the file's last modification time in seconds

'$(( ))' is bash's way of doing maths

'[ X -lt 10 ]' tests the result is Less Than 10

otherwise sleep for 1 second and repeat

.

Note: Clever as this script is, inotify is smarter.

echo $(date +%m) past $(date +%H) | espeak
2015-05-09 12:24:13
User: hal8
Functions: date echo
0

s/espeak/say/ on a mac

diff <(ssh $remote_site cat $file) $file
2015-05-09 11:11:56
User: hal8
Functions: cat diff ssh
0

opens the output of some command as a file so this also works with graphical editors like meld, kdiff3 etc

meld <(ssh $remote_site cat .zshrc) .zshrc
ps aux
echo -e $_{1..80}'\b+'
sleep 10 & perl -e '$|=@s=qw(-Ooooo \oOooo |ooOoo /oooOo -ooooO \oooOo |ooOoo /oOooo);while(kill 0,'$!'){ print "\r",$s[$t++%($#s+1)];select(undef,undef,undef,0.2);}'
while [ "$(ls -l --full-time TargetFile)" != "$a" ] ; do a=$(ls -l --full-time TargetFile); sleep 10; done
2015-05-09 03:19:49
User: dmmst19
Functions: ls sleep
1

Here's a way to wait for a file (a download, a logfile, etc) to stop changing, then do something. As written it will just return to the prompt, but you could add a "; echo DONE" or whatever at the end.

This just compares the full output of "ls" every 10 seconds, and as keeps going as long as that output has changed since the last interval. If the file's being appended to the size will change, and if it's being modified without growing the timestamp from the --full-time option will have changed. The output of just "ls -l" isn't sufficient since by default it doesn't show seconds, just minutes.

Waiting for a file to stop changing is not a very elegant or reliable way to measure that some process is finished - if you know the process ID there are much better ways. This method will also give a false positive if the changes to the target file are delayed longer than the sleep interval for any reason (network timeouts, etc). But sometimes the process that is writing the file doesn't exit, rather it continues on doing something else, so this approach can be useful if you understand its limitations.

tr -s ' ' | cut -d' ' -f2-
du -ks .[^.]* * | sort -n
2015-05-08 12:26:34
User: rdc
Functions: du sort
Tags: du usage disk
0

This command summarizes the disk usage across the files and folders in a given directory, including hidden files and folders beginning with ".", but excluding the directories "." and ".."

It produces a sorted list with the largest files and folders at the bottom of the list

while kill -0 0; do timeout 5 bash -c 'spinner=( Ooooo oOooo ooOoo oooOo ooooO oooOo ooOoo oOooo); while true; do for i in ${spinner[@]}; do for _ in seq 0 ${#i}; do echo -en "\b\b"; done; echo -ne "${i}"; sleep 0.2; done; done'; done
2015-05-07 19:13:08
User: anapsix
Functions: bash echo kill seq sleep
1

alternatively, run the spinner for 5 seconds:

timeout 5 bash -c 'spinner=( Ooooo oOooo ooOoo oooOo ooooO oooOo ooOoo oOooo); while true; do for i in ${spinner[@]}; do for j in seq 0 ${#i}; do echo -en "\b\b"; done; echo -ne "${i}"; sleep 0.2; done; done'

i=in.swf; dump-gnash -1 -j 1280 -k 720 -D "${i%.*}".bgra@12 -A "${i%.*}".wav "${i}"
2015-05-06 23:52:39
User: mhs
0

This will dump a raw BGRA pixel stream and WAV which must then be converted to video:

ffmpeg -f rawvideo -c:v rawvideo -s 1280x720 -r 12 -pix_fmt bgra -i "${i%.*}".bgra -c:v libx264 -preset veryslow -qp 0 -movflags +faststart -i "${i%.*}".wav -c:a libfdk_aac -b:a 384k "${i%.*}".mp4 ; rm "${i%.*}".bgra "${i%.*}".wav

Our example generates an x264/720p/12fps/AAC best-quality MP4.

To get dump-gnash, first install the build-dependencies for gnash (this step is OS-specific). Then:

git clone http://git.savannah.gnu.org/r/gnash.git ; cd gnash ; ./autogen.sh ; ./configure --enable-renderer=agg --enable-gui=dump --disable-menus --enable-media=ffmpeg --disable-jemalloc ; make
awk '{out="";for(i=2;i<=NF;i++){out=out" "$i};sub(/ /, "", out);print out}'
2015-05-06 22:26:28
User: endix
Functions: awk
Tags: awk
-1

Increase "2" in "i=2" to drop more columns.

wget -q -O- https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/ | grep Linux/7/pdf | cut -d \" -f 2 | awk '{print "https://access.redhat.com"$1}' | xargs wget
tail -f /var/squid/logs/access.log | perl -pe 's/(\d+)/localtime($1)/e'
sudo mysql -sNe 'show tables like "PREFIX_%"' DBNAME | xargs sudo mysqldump DBNAME > /tmp/dump.sql