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Terminal - All commands - 12,337 results
netstat -np | grep -v ^unix
2015-11-09 17:22:30
User: UnklAdM
Functions: grep netstat
6

I often have to google this so I put it here for quick reference.

echo 'echo /etc/games/fortune > ~/mailsignature.txt' >> .bashrc
2015-11-07 15:17:12
User: dededede
Functions: echo
0

In Thunderbird open the settings for your email account, mark the checkbox for 'Attach the signature from a file instead' and use the filename '~/mailsignature.txt'

Now every time when you open a terminal you see the fortune displayed in the terminal and the mail signature gets regenerated.

command ${MYVAR:+--someoption=$MYVAR}
2015-11-04 19:47:24
User: pdxdoughnut
Functions: command
1

See "Parameter Expansion" in the bash manpage. They refer to this as "Use Alternate Value", but we're including the var in the at alternative.

[ -n "$REMOTE_USER" ] || read -p "Remote User: " -er -i "$LOGNAME" REMOTE_USER
2015-10-30 17:08:17
User: pdxdoughnut
Functions: read
Tags: read input
2

The read command reads input and puts it into a variable. With -i you set an initial value. In this case I used a known environment variable.

sudo -E rpm -Uvh "http://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm"
2015-10-29 14:06:48
User: zlemini
Functions: rpm sudo
1

In this case the current user has proxy variable set which allows access to the rpm on the internet but needs root privs to install it.

Running sudo -E preserves the current user proxy var and allows the rpm install to be executed with sudo.

find / -name \*.php -exec grep -Hn .1.=.......0.=.......3.=.......2.=.......5.= {} \;
2015-10-28 20:58:53
User: UnklAdM
Functions: find grep
0

If this matches any files on your web server expect to find allot of malware spread throughout your server folders. Seems to target wordpress sites. Be sure to check your themes/theme-name/header.php files manually for various redirect scripting usually in the line right above the close head tag.

Good luck!

find / -name \*.php -exec grep -Hn preg_replace {} \;|grep /e|grep POST
rename 's/ //g' *
ls -1 | while read a; do mv "$a" `echo $a | sed -e 's/\ //g'`; done
grep -Pooh .*t..r,.* /etc/init.d/*
2015-10-23 17:35:28
User: drewbenn
Functions: grep
0

Someone quoted Pooh in an init script. Let's see it!

(Probably only works on Debian & friends)

debsecan --format detail
2015-10-22 18:46:41
User: pdxdoughnut
3

You can search for CVEs at https://security-tracker.debian.org/tracker/ or use --report to get full links. This can be added to cron, but unless you're going to do manual patches, you'd just be torturing yourself.

bar() { foo=$(ls -rt|tail -1) && read -ep "cat $foo? <y/n> " a && [[ $a != "n" ]] && eval "cat $foo" ;}
2015-10-21 20:09:33
User: knoppix5
Functions: eval ls read tail
0

This command will display the file, but you can change 'cat' to anything else

(type 'n' when prompted to cancel the command or anything else to proceed).

.

Some hints for newbies:

type

unset bar

to make 'bar' function annihilated.

For permanent usage you can put this (bar) function in your .bashrc (for bash) or in .profile (for sh).

With:

. ~/.bashrc

you can get all new inserted functions in .bashrc (so the function 'bar'

or whatever name you choose) immediately available.

tcpdump -i eth1 -s0 -v -w /tmp/capture_`date +%d_%m_%Y__%H_%I_%S`.pcap
tcpdump -i eth1 -s0 -v -w /tmp/capture.pcap
2015-10-21 09:14:26
User: erez83
Functions: tcpdump
0

capture trafic for wireshark from spesific eth interface

echo ${IP} | sed "s/[0-9\.]//g"
2015-10-19 18:20:03
User: andregyn62
Functions: echo sed
0

This command validates if exist any character different in 0-255 and dot.

If any characters different is typed the error menssage is showing.

echo $IP | egrep '^(([0-9]{1,2}|1[0-9][0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.){3}([0-9]{1,2}|1[0-9][0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])$'
echo "obase=2;$((($(date +%s)-$(date +%s -d YYYY-MM-DD))/86400))" | bc
2015-10-19 15:40:32
User: flatcap
Functions: echo
2

Print out your age in days in binary.

Today's my binary birthday, I'm 2^14 days old :-)

.

This command does bash arithmatic $(( )) on two dates:

Today: $(date +%s)

Date of birth: $(date +%s -d YYYY-MM-DD)

The dates are expressed as the number of seconds since the Unix epoch (Jan 1970),

so we devide the difference by 86400 (seconds per day).

.

Finally we pipe "obase=2; DAYS-OLD" into bc to convert to binary.

(obase == output base)

D="$(date "+%F %T.%N")"; [COMMAND]; find . -newermt "$D"
2015-10-15 21:09:54
User: flatcap
Functions: find
2

Often you run a command, but afterwards you're not quite sure what it did.

By adding this prefix/suffix around [COMMAND], you can list any files that were modified.

.

Take a nanosecond timestamp: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.NNNNNNNNN

date "+%F %T.%N"

.

Find any files that have been modified since that timestamp:

find . -newermt "$D"

.

This command currently only searches below the current directory.

If you want to look elsewhere change the find parameter, e.g.

find /var/log . -newermt "$D"
touch .tardis; the command ; find . -newer .tardis; rm .tardis;
2015-10-15 19:18:54
User: BeniBela
Functions: command find rm touch
1

This lists all files modified after calling some command using a temporal anchor.

# journalctl -u sshd --no-pager # display sshd log entries
2015-10-15 08:48:47
User: mpb
Functions: sshd
2

In pre-systemd systems, something like: "# grep sshd /var/log/messages" would display log events in /var/log/messages containing "sshd".

# journalctl -u sshd --no-pager

The above command displays similar results for systemd systems.

(Note that this needs to be run with root permissions to access the log data.)

unzip -l files.zip
2015-10-15 07:07:42
User: erez83
-1

View files in ZIP archive

unzip -l files.zip

unzip -j "myarchive.zip" "in/archive/file.txt" -d "/path/to/unzip/to"
2015-10-15 07:06:19
User: erez83
0

Extract only a specific file from a zipped archive to a given directory

unzip -j "myarchive.zip" "in/archive/file.txt" -d "/path/to/unzip/to"

unzip /surce/file.zip -d /dest/
bg; jobs; fg
2015-10-14 17:33:25
User: djangofan
Functions: bg
1

./script.sh

# suspend process

{ctrl-Z}

# background process

bg

# list all backgrounded jobs

jobs

# bring it back to foreground

fg

ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script -f \"$L\"";}
2015-10-14 13:14:29
User: flatcap
Functions: ssh
3

A wrapper around ssh to automatically provide logging and session handling.

This function runs ssh, which runs screen, which runs script.

.

The logs and the screen session are stored on the server.

This means you can leave a session running and re-attach to it later, or from another machine.

.

.

Requirements:

* Log sessions on a remote server

* Transparent - nothing extra to type

* No installation - nothing to copy to the server beforehand

.

Features:

* Function wrapper delegating to ssh

- so nothing to remember

- uses .ssh/config as expected

- passes your command line option to ssh

* Self-contained: no scripts to install on the server

* Uses screen(1), so is:

- detachable

- re-attachable

- shareable

* Records session using script(1)

* Configurable log file location, which may contain variables or whitespace

L="$HOME" # local variable

L="\$HOME" # server variable

L="some space"

.

Limitations:

* Log dir/file may not contain '~' (which would require eval on the server)

.

.

The sessions are named by the local user connecting to the server.

Therefore if you detach and re-run the same command you will reconnect to your original session.

If you want to connect/share another's session simply run:

USER=bob ssh [email protected]

.

The command above is stripped down to an absolute minimum.

A fully expanded and annotated version is available as a Gist (git pastebin):

https://gist.github.com/flatcap/3c42326abeb1197ee714

.

If you want to add timing info to script, change the command to:

ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script --timing=\"$L-timing\" -f \"$L\"";}