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Terminal - All commands - 12,334 results
wmsetbg -s -u path_to_wallpaper
2009-10-21 11:23:54
User: eastwind
1

set directly the wallpaper on windowmaker , use this command with display of imagemagick :)

mencoder mf://image1.jpg,image2.jpg,image3.jpg -mf w=800:h=600:fps=25:type=jpeg -ovc copy -oac copy -o output.avi
2009-10-21 09:17:22
User: eastwind
-1

syntax :

mencoder mf://filemask -mf

option availble for mf :

* w=value : the width of the output, by d?fault : autodetected

* h=value : height of the output, by default : autodetected

* fps=value : framerate of the output, by default : 25

* type=value : file format type input , avaible: jpeg, png, tga, sgi

mencoder mf://*.jpg -mf w=800:h=600:fps=25:type=jpeg -ovc lavc -lavcopts vcodec=mpeg4 -oac copy -o output.avi
2009-10-21 09:14:04
User: eastwind
0

syntax :

mencoder mf://filemask -mf

option availble for mf :

* w=value : the width of the output, by d?fault : autodetected

* h=value : height of the output, by default : autodetected

* fps=value : framerate of the output, by default : 25

* type=value : file format type input , avaible: jpeg, png, tga, sgi

ffmpeg -i input.mov -b 4096k -vcodec msmpeg4v2 -acodec pcm_u8 output.avi
2009-10-21 05:44:31
User: oracular
1

Convert those .mov files that your digital camera makes to .avi

Adjust the bitrate (-b) to get the appropriate file size. A larger bitrate produces a larger (higher quality) .avi file and smaller bitrate produces a smaller (lower quality) .avi file.

Requires ffmpeg (see man page for details)

(tested with canon camera MOV files)

Other examples:

ffmpeg -i input.mov -sameq -vcodec msmpeg4v2 -acodec pcm_u8 output.avi ffmpeg -i input.mov -b 1024k -vcodec msmpeg4v2 -acodec pcm_u8 output.avi
awk 'FNR==5' <file>
2009-10-20 22:52:41
User: dennisw
Functions: awk
1

Just one character longer than the sed version ('FNR==5' versus -n 5p). On my system, without using "exit" or "q", the awk version is over four times faster on a ~900K file using the following timing comparison:

testfile="testfile"; for cmd in "awk 'FNR==20'" "sed -n '20p'"; do echo; echo $cmd; eval "$cmd $testfile"; for i in {1..3}; do time for j in {1..100}; do eval "$cmd $testfile" >/dev/null; done; done; done

Adding "exit" or "q" made the difference between awk and sed negligible and produced a four-fold improvement over the awk timing without the "exit".

For long files, an exit can speed things up:

awk 'FNR==5{print;exit}' <file>
seg() { for b in $(echo $1); do for x in $(seq 10); do echo $b.$x; done; done }
seg() { echo -e "$1" | while read LINE; do for b in $(seq 10); do echo $LINE.$b; done; done; }
echo -e "n\np\n1\n\n\nt\n8e\nw" | fdisk /dev/sdX
2009-10-20 16:21:54
User: sud0er
Functions: echo fdisk
Tags: Linux fdisk
-1

This is a bit hacky, but if you're setting up a bunch of new LUNs, it can save a bunch of time. Also check out sfdisk. The fdisk will fail if, for example, a partition table already exists.

teste.txt < cut -d : -f 1,5 /etc/passwd | tr : \\t | tr a-z A-Z | cat teste.txt
defaults write com.macromates.textmate OakDefaultLanguage 17994EC8-6B1D-11D9-AC3A-000D93589AF6
2009-10-20 07:10:34
User: vigo
Functions: write
-1

When you press "cmd+n" in TextMate, you can have "HTML" language as default document format... You can also define other languages too. You need to know the UUID of your language bundle.

ssh [email protected] 'dd if=sda.img' | dd of=/dev/sda
dd if=/dev/sda | ssh [email protected] 'dd of=sda.img'
for a in bzip2 lzma gzip;do echo -n>$a;for b in $(seq 0 256);do dd if=/dev/zero of=$b.zero bs=$b count=1;c=$(date +%s%N);$a $b.zero;d=$(date +%s%N);total=$(echo $d-$c|bc);echo $total>>$a;rm $b.zero *.bz2 *.lzma *.gz;done;done
2009-10-20 01:00:51
User: matthewbauer
Functions: bzip2 date dd echo seq
3

See: http://imgur.com/JgjK2.png for example.

Do some serious benchmarking from the commandline. This will write to a file with the time it took to compress n bytes to the file (increasing by 1).

Run:

gnuplot -persist <(echo "plot 'lzma' with lines, 'gzip' with lines, 'bzip2' with lines")

To see it in graph form.

cat private-file | gpg2 --encrypt --armor --recipient "Disposable Key" | mailx -s "Email Subject" [email protected]
2009-10-19 20:38:37
User: slashdot
Functions: cat mailx
2

This is a quick and easy way of encrypting files in a datastream, without ever really creating an output file from gpg. Useful with cron also, when file(s) have to be sent based on a set schedule.

sed -ne '/^Package: \(.*\)/{s//\1/;h;};/^Installed-Size: \(.*\)/{s//\1/;G;s/\n/ /;p;}' /var/lib/dpkg/status | sort -rn
2009-10-19 19:01:17
User: arcege
Functions: sed sort
-3

Use the hold space to preserve lines until data is needed.

awk '{if (NR == 3) print}' <file>
2009-10-19 15:58:09
User: yooreck
Functions: awk
-5

I don't know if it's better but works fine :)

perl -ne '$pkg=$1 if m/^Package: (.*)/; print "$1\t$pkg\n" if m/^Installed-Size: (.*)/;' < /var/lib/dpkg/status | sort -rn | less
2009-10-19 12:55:59
User: hfs
Functions: perl sort
0

List packages and their disk usage in decreasing order. This uses the "Installed-Size" from the package metadata. It may differ from the actual used space, because e.g. data files (think of databases) or log files may take additional space.

rsync -rvtW --progress --include='*.wmv' --include='*.mpg' --exclude='*.*' <sourcedir> <destdir>
2009-10-19 10:38:11
Functions: rsync
Tags: rsync
1

Copying only wmv and mpg files recursively from to

uuencode -m $1 /dev/stdout | sed '1d' | sed '$d' | tr -d '\n' | xclip -selection clipboard
2009-10-19 09:03:09
User: caliburning
Functions: sed tr uuencode
Tags: xclip uuencode
1

I use it for embedding images in CSS for Stylish, the Firefox addon.

Thought it might be useful to others.

sed -n '/^function h\(\)/,/^}/p' script.sh
2009-10-19 07:55:35
User: haivu
Functions: sed
Tags: bash sed
8

I often need to extract a function from a bash script and this command will do it.

geoip(){curl -s "http://www.geody.com/geoip.php?ip=${1}" | sed '/^IP:/!d;s/<[^>][^>]*>//g' ;}
echo start > battery.txt; watch -n 60 'date >> battery.txt ; acpi -b >> battery.txt'
2009-10-19 05:28:15
User: m33600
Functions: acpi echo watch
1

This time I added a print to reemaining energy, every minute, time stamped.

The example shown here is complete and point to large discrepancies as time passes, converging to accuracy near the end.

for i in $(netstat --inet -n|grep ESTA|awk '{print $5}'|cut -d: -f1);do geoiplookup $i;done
2009-10-18 20:41:47
Functions: awk cut grep netstat
3

Sample command to obtain a list of geographic localization for established connections, extracted from netstat. Need geoiplookup command ( part of geoip package under CentOS)

echo start > battery.txt; watch -n 60 'date >> battery.txt'
2009-10-18 07:00:26
User: m33600
Functions: echo watch
0

Fully recharge your computer battery and start this script.

It will create or clean the file named battery.txt, print a start on it and every minute it will append a time stamp to it.

Batteries last few hours, and each hour will have 60 lines of time stamping. Really good for assuring the system was tested in real life with no surprises.

The last time stamp inside the battery.txt file is of interest. It is the time the computer went off, as the battery was dead!

Turn on your computer after that, on AC power of course, and open battery.txt. Read the first and last time stamps and now you really know if you can trust your computer sensors.

If you want a simple line of text inside the battery.txt file, use this:

watch -n 60 'date > battery.txt'

The time of death will be printed inside

weather() { lynx -dump "http://mobile.weather.gov/port_zh.php?inputstring=$*" | sed 's/^ *//;/ror has occ/q;2h;/__/!{x;s/\n.*//;x;H;d};x;s/\n/ -- /;q';}