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Functions

All commands from sorted by
Terminal - All commands - 12,330 results
ls -alh #mycomment
2009-10-06 13:55:06
Functions: ls
5

Comments can be used directly on the command line so I can save in the history a brief description of what command does.

mysql -u root -pPasswort -e 'select table_schema,round(sum(data_length+index_length)/1024/1024,4) from information_schema.tables group by table_schema;'
cat file.txt | while read line; do printf "%7.2f -> %7.2f\n" $line; done
ffmpeg -i input.flv -vhook '/usr/lib/vhook/imlib2.so -c white -x 250 -y H+(-1.8*N+80) -t Hallo! -A max(0,255-exp(N/16))' -sameq -acodec copy output.flv
lsof -i tcp -i udp
echo "vertical text" | fold -1
awk '{print(substr($0,1,5))}' file
2009-10-05 18:58:49
Functions: awk
-2

Consider this file :

laminate

this

file

with awk

hello to

commandlinefu

I can use awk substring to laminate words :

lamin

this

file

with

hello

comma

Similar to http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/2000/laminate-files-line-by-line

find . -type f -exec sha1sum {} >> SHA1SUMS \;
2009-10-05 18:33:59
User: gpenguin
Functions: find sha1sum
2

All output is placed in file SHA1SUMS which you can later check with 'sha1sum --check'. Works on most Linux distros where 'sha1sum' is installed.

hardinfo -am benchmark.so -f html > report.html
2009-10-05 17:41:25
1

Nicely display in html format a detailed report of the machine, including cpu benchmarks.

[[ "x$TERM" == "xrxvt" || "x$XTERM_VERSION" == xXTerm* || "x$COLORTERM" == 'gnome-terminal' && "x$SHELL" == */bin/zsh ]] && preexec () { print -Pn "\e]0;$1\a" }
2009-10-05 15:39:45
User: Patola
0

Found another way, more compatible. Tested with xterm, aterm, gnome-terminal and rxvt (where it sets the window title) and guake (where it doesn't - after all, guake does not show the window title).

if [ "$SHELL" = '/bin/zsh' ]; then case $TERM in rxvt|*term|linux) preexec () { print -Pn "\e]0;$1\a" };; esac; fi
shutdown -rF now
2009-10-05 15:02:36
User: SuperFly
Functions: shutdown
2

Force an fsck on reboot. Useful on a system where / has mounted read-only because of file system issues.

find /proc -user myuser -maxdepth 1 -type d -mtime +7 -exec basename {} \; | xargs kill -9
netstat -ltun
2009-10-05 08:39:03
User: Decoy
Functions: netstat
0

Works only on Linux.

Last option (n) turn name of service resolving (/etc/services) off.

netstat -anp --tcp --udp | grep LISTEN
ssh [email protected] "mysqldump -h localhost -u mysqluser -pP@$$W3rD databasename | gzip -cf" | gunzip -c > database.sql
2009-10-05 00:57:51
User: daws
Functions: gunzip ssh
8

This command will dump a database on a remote stream to stdout, compress it, stream it to your local machine, decompress it and put it into a file called database.sql.You could even pipe it into mysql on your local machine to restore it immediately. I had to use this recently because the server I needed a backup from didn't have enough disk space.

egrep 'Failed password for invalid' /var/log/secure | awk '{print $13}' | uniq
2009-10-04 18:08:13
Functions: awk egrep
1

Work for me on CentOS, grep and print ip addresses of ssh bruteforce attempts

openssl des3 -salt -in unencrypted-data.tar -out encrypted-data.tar.des3
2009-10-03 03:50:46
User: berot3
3

The lifehacker way: http://lifehacker.com/software/top/geek-to-live--encrypt-your-data-178005.php#Alternate%20Method:%20OpenSSL

"That command will encrypt the unencrypted-data.tar file with the password you choose and output the result to encrypted-data.tar.des3. To unlock the encrypted file, use the following command:"

openssl des3 -d -salt -in encrypted-data.tar.des3 -out unencrypted-data.tar
ls [FILENAME] | xargs openssl sha1
2009-10-03 02:05:43
User: m00dimus
Functions: ls xargs
1

List files and pass to openssl to calculate the hash for each file.

date|osd_cat
2009-10-02 18:26:46
User: din7
Functions: date
7

This is very useful if you need to show someone some text from a distance. (Like someone standing over your shoulder...)

I'd recommend aliasing it to something like:

alias osd_cat="osd_cat -o 400 -s 8 -c blue -d 60 -f -*-bitstream\ vera\ sans-*-*-*--200-*-*-*-*-*-*-*"

xosd is the utility that provides osd_cat.

sqlite3 mydb.sqlite3 '.dump' | grep -vE '^(BEGIN|COMMIT|CREATE|DELETE)|"sqlite_sequence"' | sed -r 's/"([^"]+)"/`\1`/' | tee mydb.sql | mysql -p mydb
2009-10-02 14:40:51
User: mislav
Functions: grep sed tee
Tags: mysql sqlite dump
0

Filters out all non-insert SQL operations (we couldn't filter out only lines starting with "INSERT" because inserts can span multiple lines), quotes table names with backticks, saves dump to a file and pipes it straight to mysql.

This transfers only data--it expects your schema is already in place. In Ruby on Rails, you can easily recreate the schema in MySQL with "rake db:schema:load RAILS_ENV=production".

md5sum --check MD5SUMS | grep -v ": OK"
2009-10-02 05:21:17
User: gpenguin
Functions: grep md5sum
6

All valid files are withheld so only failures show up. No output, all checks good.

sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'
9

I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server.

So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg.

Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time.

sitepass() { echo -n "$@" | md5sum | sha1sum | sha224sum | sha256sum | sha384sum | sha512sum | gzip - | strings -n 1 | tr -d "[:space:]" | tr -s '[:print:]' | tr '!-~' 'P-~!-O' | rev | cut -b 2-11; history -d $(($HISTCMD-1)); }
2009-10-01 20:14:57
User: syssyphus
Tags: Security
14

usage: sitepass MaStErPaSsWoRd example.com

description: An admittedly excessive amount of hashing, but this will give you a pretty secure password, It also eliminates repeated characters and deletes itself from your command history.

tr '!-~' 'P-~!-O' # this bit is rot47, kinda like rot13 but more nerdy

rev # this avoids the first few bytes of gzip payload, and the magic bytes.

$foo[(I)$foo[-1]]
2009-10-01 20:07:14
User: andrew112358
-1

Returns the index of the last element in the array.