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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

Top Tags



Psst. Open beta.

Wow, didn't really expect you to read this far down. The latest iteration of the site is in open beta. It's a gentle open beta-- not in prime-time just yet. It's being hosted over at UpGuard (link) and you are more than welcome to give it a shot. Couple things:

  • » The open beta is running a copy of the database that will not carry over to the final version. Don't post anything you don't mind losing.
  • » If you wish to use your user account, you will probably need to reset your password.
Your feedback is appreciated via the form on the beta page. Thanks! -Jon & CLFU Team

All commands from sorted by
Terminal - All commands - 12,362 results
echo "5 k 3 5 / p" | dc
2009-09-03 00:21:54
User: xamaco
Functions: echo

using bc is for sissies. dc is much better :-D

Polish notation will rule the world...

find ~/Library/Application\ Support/Firefox/ -type f -name "*.sqlite" -exec sqlite3 {} VACUUM \;
nmap -R -sL | awk '{if($3=="not")print"("$2") no PTR";else print$3" is "$2}' | grep '('
2009-09-02 16:33:15
User: netsaint
Functions: awk grep
Tags: nmap dns

This command uses nmap to perform reverse DNS lookups on a subnet. It produces a list of IP addresses with the corresponding PTR record for a given subnet. You can enter the subnet in CDIR notation (i.e. /24 for a Class C)). You could add "--dns-servers x.x.x.x" after the "-sL" if you need the lookups to be performed on a specific DNS server.

On some installations nmap needs sudo I believe. Also I hope awk is standard on most distros.

bc -l <<< s(3/5)
2009-09-02 15:41:39
User: akg240
Functions: bc

-l auto-selects many more digits (but you can round/truncate in your head, right) plus it loads a few math functions like sin().

awk '/d.[0-9]/{print $4}' /proc/partitions
2009-09-02 15:26:03
User: akg240
Functions: awk

Only one command and not dependant on full read access to the devices.

fdisk -l |grep -e '^/' |awk '{print $1}'|sed -e "s|/dev/||g"
cal -y
2009-09-02 12:57:23
User: andrepuel
Functions: cal

Show today date on a yearly calendar.

free -m | awk '/Swap/ {print $4}'
2009-09-02 11:46:17
User: voyeg3r
Functions: awk free

simple way to show free swap

free -b | grep "Swap:" | sed 's/ * / /g' | cut -d ' ' -f2
$php_dir/bin/php -i | grep configure
find ~/.mozilla/firefox/ -type f -name "*.sqlite" -exec sqlite3 {} VACUUM \;
for dnsREC in $(curl -s http://www.iana.org/assignments/dns-parameters |grep -Eo ^[A-Z\.]+\ |sed 's/TYPE//'); do echo -n "$dnsREC " && dig +short $dnsREC IANA.ORG; done
sudo grub-install --recheck /dev/sda1
grep -lir "sometext" * > sometext_found_in.log
2009-08-31 23:48:45
User: shaiss
Functions: grep
Tags: find text

I find this format easier to read if your going through lots of files. This way you can open the file in any editor and easily review the file

cut -f N- file.dat
strace <name of the program>
awk '{print substr($0, index($0,$N))}'
2009-08-31 19:47:10
User: mstoecker
Functions: awk

This command will print all fields from the given input to the end of each line, starting with the Nth field.

touch /tmp/file ; $EXECUTECOMMAND ; find /path -newer /tmp/file
2009-08-31 18:47:19
User: matthewdavis
Functions: find touch

This has helped me numerous times trying to find either log files or tmp files that get created after execution of a command. And really eye opening as to how active a given process really is. Play around with -anewer, -cnewer & -newerXY

wget -nv http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux -O- | egrep -o "http://[^[:space:]]*.jpg" | xargs -P 10 -r -n 1 wget -nv
2009-08-31 18:37:33
User: syssyphus
Functions: egrep wget xargs

xargs can be used in this manner to download multiple files at a time, and xargs will in this case run 10 processes at a time and initiate a new one when the number running falls below 10.

dsh -M -c -f servers -- "command HERE"
2009-08-31 12:08:38
User: foob4r
Tags: ssh multiple

dsh - Distributed shell, or dancer?s shell ;-)

you can put your servers into /etc/dsh/machines.list than you don't have to serperate them by commata or group them in different files and only run commands for this groups

dsh -M -c -a -- "apt-get update"

scutil --dns
B <<< $(A)
yum --nogpgcheck install "examplePackage"
2009-08-30 18:18:30
User: iDen
Functions: install

Same as:

1 rpm -ivh package.rpm

2 yum localinstall package.rpm

3 Edit /etc/yum.conf or repository.repo and change the value of gpgcheck from 1 to 0 (!dangerous)

awk '{print $1}' /var/log/httpd/access_log | sort | uniq -c | sort -rnk1 | head -n 10
httpd -S