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Terminal - All commands - 12,070 results
touch $2;firefox -print $1 -printmode PDF -printfile $2
2009-08-04 06:40:55
User: pamirian
Functions: touch
5

This uses the "command-line print" plugin for Firefox (http://torisugari.googlepages.com/commandlineprint2). This same plugin can also produce PNGs. On *nix, the file must exist; therefore the touch bit in front. Also, firefox seems to ignore saved user preferences when "printing" this way (margins, header, footer, etc.), so I had to tweak my ~/.mozilla/firefox/xxxxxxxx.default/prefs.js file by hand. Yup, that's *prefs.js* not user.js - apparently, firefox ignores my user.js file too...

cat frame/*.mpeg | ffmpeg -i $ID.mp3 -i - -f dvd -y track/$ID.mpg 2>/dev/null
2009-08-04 06:31:50
User: pamirian
Functions: cat
5

This is an extract from a larger script which formats the video for DVD. The videos I use have no audio track so I need to add one. Tweak as you like...

ffmpeg -loop_input -f image2 -r 30000/1001 -t $seconds -i frame/$num.ppm -y frame/%02d.mpeg 2>/dev/null
2009-08-04 06:25:47
User: pamirian
4

This is an extract from a larger script which makes up slideshow videos from images. $seconds is the number of seconds the video will last, and $num is a loop counter which numbers the videos for concat into a longer video later, so they will be in order. The dev/null bit on the end cuts ffmpeg's verbosity.

ifconfig | grep "0xffffffff" | awk '{ print $2 }' | xargs -n 1 ifconfig em0 delete
2009-08-04 05:18:36
User: vwal
Functions: awk grep ifconfig xargs
3

The example command deletes all aliases for network interface 'em0' assuming that the aliases have netmask of 255.255.255.255 and the master IP has some other netmask (such as 255.255.255.0). See here -> http://my.galagzee.com/2009/07/22/deleting-all-network-interface-aliases/ for more on the rationale of this command.

printf '\!:1\0\!:1\0\!:2' | mmencode | tr -d '\n' | sed 's/^/AUTH PLAIN /'
2009-08-04 05:04:50
User: vwal
Functions: printf sed tr
4

I use this as an alias:

alias authplain "printf '\!:1\0\!:1\0\!:2' | mmencode | tr -d '\n' | sed 's/^/AUTH PLAIN /'"

then..

# authplain [email protected] secretpassword

AUTH PLAIN c29tZXVzZXJAc29tZWRvbWFpbi5jb20Ac29tZXVzZXJAc29tZWRvbWFpbi5jb20Ac2VjcmV0cGFzc3dvcmQ=

#

curl -s http://isc.sans.org/sources.html|grep "ipinfo.html"|awk -F"ip=" {'print $2'}|awk -F"\"" {'print $1'}|xargs -n1 sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -j DROP -d > 2&>1
git --no-pager whatchanged -1 --pretty=medium <commit_hash>
alias z='zenity --info --text="You will not believe it, but your command has finished now! :-)" --display :0.0'
2009-08-03 16:38:29
User: bubo
Functions: alias
4

tired of switching to the console to check if some command has finished yet? if notify-send does not work on your box try this one... e.g. rsync -av -e /usr/bin/lsh $HOME slowconnection.bar:/mnt/backup ; z (now fire up X, do something useful, get notified if this stuff has finished).

ping -o -i 30 HOSTNAME && osascript -e 'tell app "Terminal" to display dialog "Server is up" buttons "It?s about time" default button 1'
2009-08-03 16:06:57
User: neologism
Functions: ping
Tags: macosx ping
7

When run on a mac, this command will bring up a dialog box in the Terminal when server HOSTNAME first responds to a ping.

copy(){ cp -v "$1" "$2"&watch -n 1 'du -h "$1" "$2";printf "%s%%\n" $(echo `du -h "$2"|cut -dG -f1`/0.`du -h "$1"|cut -dG -f1`|bc)';}
find . -type d -exec env d="$dest_root" sh -c ' exec mkdir -p -- "$d/$1"' '{}' '{}' \;
tmpfile=$(mktemp) && echo -e 'startup_message off\nscreen -t top htop\nsplit\nfocus\nscreen -t nethogs nethogs wlan0\nsplit\nfocus\nscreen -t iotop iotop' > $tmpfile && sudo screen -c $tmpfile
2009-08-03 10:14:02
User: Patola
Functions: echo screen sudo top
18

This command starts screen with 'htop', 'nethogs' and 'iotop' in split-screen. You have to have these three commands (of course) and specify the interface for nethogs - mine is wlan0, I could have acquired the interface from the default route extending the command but this way is simpler.

htop is a wonderful top replacement with many interactive commands and configuration options. nethogs is a program which tells which processes are using the most bandwidth. iotop tells which processes are using the most I/O.

The command creates a temporary "screenrc" file which it uses for doing the triple-monitoring. You can see several examples of screenrc files here: http://www.softpanorama.org/Utilities/Screen/screenrc_examples.shtml

ps -o comm= -p $(ps -o ppid= -p $$)
2009-08-03 07:41:21
User: olorin
Functions: ps
4

Get the name of the parent command. This might be helpful, if you need to react on that information. E. g. a script called directly via ssh has got sshd as parent, manually invoked the parent process will probably be bash

/sbin/kexec -l /boot/$KERNEL --append="$KERNELPARAMTERS" --initrd=/boot/$INITRD; sync; /sbin/kexec -e
2009-08-03 07:36:49
User: olorin
Tags: Linux boot kexec
21

If you are doing some tests which require reboots (e. g. startup skripts, kernel module parameters, ...), this is very time intensive, if you have got a hardware with a long pre-boot phase due to hardware checks.

At this time, kexec can help, which only restarts the kernel with all related stuff.

First the kernel to be started is loaded, then kexec -e jumps up to start it.

Is as hard as a reboot -f, but several times faster (e. g. 1 Minute instead of 12 on some servers here).

for a in `ls`; do echo $a && convert $a -resize <Width>x<Height> $a; done
2009-08-02 22:35:24
User: leavittx
Functions: echo
0

Resizes all images in the curent directory to x resolution.

It is better than `mogrify -resize *.jpg` because of independence from extension of image (e.g. .jpg and .JPG) (:

echo $((`eix --only-names -I | wc -l` * 100 / `eix --only-names | wc -l`))%
ssh -t user@host screen -x <screen name>
2009-08-02 15:39:24
User: Dark006
Functions: screen ssh
7

If you know the benefits of screen, then this might come in handy for you. Instead of ssh'ing into a machine and then running a screen command, this can all be done on one line instead. Just have the person on the machine your ssh'ing into run something like

screen -S debug

Then you would run

ssh -t user@host screen -x debug

and be attached to the same screen session.

wget `lynx -dump http://www.ebow.com/ebowtube.php | grep .flv$ | sed 's/[[:blank:]]\+[[:digit:]]\+\. //g'`
2009-08-02 14:09:53
User: spaceyjase
Functions: grep sed wget
3

I wanted all the 'hidden' .flv files from the http link in the command line; wget seemed appropriate, fed with output from lynx, grep the flv files and the normalised via sed (to remove the numeric bullet). Similar to the 'Grab mp3 files' fu. Replace link with your own, grep arg with something more interesting ;) See here for something along the same lines...

http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1006/grab-mp3-files-from-your-favorite-netcasts-mp3blog-or-sites-that-often-have-good-mp3s

Hope you find it useful! Improvements welcome, naturally.

debootstrap --arch i386 lenny /opt/debian ftp://debian.das.ufsc.br/pub/debian/
yum clean all ; rpm -Uvh http://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/fedora/linux/releases/11/Fedora/i386/os/Packages/fedora-release-11-1.noarch.rpm ; yum -y upgrade ; reboot
du -aB1m|awk '$1 >= 100'
net=DTAG-DIAL ; for (( i=1; i<30; i++ )); do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; done
2009-08-01 05:28:19
User: drizzt
Functions: grep sed whois
1

Useful if you f.i. want to block/allow all connections from a certain provider which uses successive netnames for his ip blocks. In this example I used the german Deutsche Telekom which has DTAG-DIAL followed by a number as netname for the dial in pools.

There are - as always ;) - different ways to do this. If you have seq available you can use

net=DTAG-DIAL ; for i in `seq 1 30`; do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; done

or without seq you can use bash brace expansion

net=DTAG-DIAL ; for i in {1..30}; do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; done

or if you like while better than for use something like

net=DTAG-DIAL ; i=1 ; while true ; do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; test $i = 30 && break ; i=$(expr $i + 1) ; done

and so on.

find . -maxdepth 2 -name "*somepattern" -print0 | xargs -0 -I "{}" echo mv "{}" /destination/path
2009-08-01 01:55:47
User: jonasrullo
Functions: echo find mv xargs
4

Only tested on Linux Ubunty Hardy. Works when file names have spaces. The "-maxdepth 2" limits the find search to the current directory and the next one deeper in this example. This was faster on my system because find was searching every directory before the current directory without the -maxdepth option. Almost as fast as locate when used as above. Must use double quotes around pattern to handle spaces in file names. -print0 is used in combination with xargs -0. Those are zeros not "O"s. For xargs, -I is used to replace the following "{}" with the incoming file-list items from find. Echo just prints to the command line what is happening with mv. mv needs "{}" again so it knows what you are moving from. Then end with the move destination. Some other versions may only require one "{}" in the move command and not after the -I, however this is what worked for me on Ubuntu 8.04. Some like to use -type f in the find command to limit the type.

seq 1 12 | sed 1,5d ; seq 1 12 | head --lines=-5
2009-08-01 00:41:52
User: flux
Functions: head sed seq
Tags: sed tail HEAD fun
0

Strangely enough, there is no option --lines=[negative] with tail, like the head's one, so we have to use sed, which is very short and clear, you see.

Strangely more enough, skipping lines at the bottom with sed is not short nor clear. From Sed one liner :

# delete the last 10 lines of a file

$ sed -e :a -e '$d;N;2,10ba' -e 'P;D' # method 1

$ sed -n -e :a -e '1,10!{P;N;D;};N;ba' # method 2

xinit -- :1
2009-07-31 23:42:28
User: flux
Tags: ssh X X11 xinit
3

This starts a very basic X session, with just a simple xterm. You can use this xterm to launch your preferred distant session.

ssh -X john@otherbox gnome-session

Try also startkde or fluxbox or xfce4-session.

To switch between your two X servers, use CTRL+ALT+F7 and CTRL+ALT+F8.