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Terminal - All commands - 12,182 results
current_dir=$(cd $(dirname $BASH_SOURCE);pwd)
2011-04-18 09:24:14
User: xeor
Functions: cd dirname
-2

I think this is the cleanest way of getting the current working directory of a script. It also works on osx, Linux, and probably bsd as well..

sudo lsof -iTCP:25
ps -ef | grep APP | awk '/grep/!{print$2}' | xargs -i kill {}
2009-02-05 16:10:05
User: hooobs
Functions: awk grep kill ps xargs
-2

Probably posted previously, I use this all the time to find and kill a process for "APP". Simply replace "APP" with the name of the process you're looking to kill.

cd $OLDPWD
2012-04-16 21:18:27
User: khopesh
Functions: cd
Tags: cd
-2

This is like `cd -` but doesn't echo the new directory name, which is preferable (to me) for an alias, e.g.

alias cdo="cd $OLDPWD"
pkill -f foo
2009-02-05 16:12:53
User: archlich
-2

Be careful when issuing this command, it may kill unwanted processes!

To only search on the process name don't use the argument -f, pkill foo

for x in *.dat;do sort -k 3 $x >tmp && mv -f tmp $x;done
2010-07-07 07:57:37
User: rajarshi
Functions: mv sort
Tags: sorting
-2

We normally get tasks in which one has to sort a data file according to some column. For a single file say foo, we would use

sort -k 3 foo >tmp && tmp foo

The for loop is useful when we have to do it on a number of files.

yes 1 | fdupes -rd $folder
2011-06-02 18:15:24
User: torrid
Functions: yes
Tags: deduplicate
-2

This command deletes all but the first occurrence of a duplicate file in one or more folders.

nautilus "$pwd"
awk '{print(substr($0,1,5))}' file
2009-10-05 18:58:49
Functions: awk
-2

Consider this file :

laminate

this

file

with awk

hello to

commandlinefu

I can use awk substring to laminate words :

lamin

this

file

with

hello

comma

Similar to http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/2000/laminate-files-line-by-line

cut -d: -f1 /etc/passwd | sort
lynx -dump http://domaim.com | egrep -o -e 'http://[/0-9a-z.]+html'
netstat -lntp
awk 'BEGIN { srand(); print rand() }'
2010-08-07 14:33:12
User: dennisw
Functions: awk
Tags: random number
-2

2d6 dice:

awk 'BEGIN { srand(); a=int(rand()*6)+1; b=int(rand()*6)+1; print a " + " b " = " a+b }'

3 + 6 = 9

ls /dev/disk/by-uuid/ -alh
cat `ls -r /sys/class/net/*/address` | sort -u
script -t 2> timing.txt -a session.txt ; Run some commands here; exit; scriptreplay timing.txt session.txt
type -a python
f -f -e mplayer movie
2011-12-09 02:58:41
User: clvv
-2

This is one use case of `f`. You need to install `f`(https://github.com/clvv/f) for this to work. With f, you can access any file by only typing some of its name regardless of where you are. f is inspired by autojump and z.

ifconfig -a | awk '/Bcast/{print $2}' | cut -c 5-19
psg(){ ps aux | grep -E "[${1:0:1}]${1:1}|^USER"; }
2015-01-01 00:12:45
User: flatcap
Functions: grep ps
Tags: grep function ps
-2

Function that searchs for process by its name:

* Shows the Header for reference

* Hides the process 'grep' from the list

* Case sensitive

The typical problem with using "ps | grep" is that the grep process shows up the in the output.

The usual solution is to search for "[p]attern" instead of "pattern".

This function turns the parameter into just such a [p]attern.

${1:0:1} is the first character of $1

.

${1:1} is characters 2-end of $1
tar -pczf archive_name.tar.gz /path/to/dir/or/file
2009-07-17 19:53:02
User: ryuslash
Functions: tar
Tags: bash tar gzip
-2

Create a single tar.gz archive

I know it's a very basic one, but it's one I keep forgetting.

alias emacs='vim'
locate searchstring | xargs grep foo
2009-04-16 12:51:24
User: zimon
Functions: grep locate xargs
Tags: grep locate
-2

Greps located files for an expression.

Example greps all LaTeX files for 'foo':

locate *.tex | xargs grep foo

To avoid searching thousands of files with grep it could be usefull to test first how much files are returned by locate:

locate -c *.tex
sqlite3 -line database.db
2010-10-09 16:10:19
User: pykler
Tags: CSV html sql sqlite
-2

Similar output to using MySQL with the \G at the end of a Query. Displays one column per line. Other modes include:

-column

Query results will be displayed in a table like form, using whitespace characters to separate the columns and align the output.

-html Query results will be output as simple HTML tables.

-line Query results will be displayed with one value per line, rows separated by a blank line. Designed to be easily parsed by scripts or other programs

-list Query results will be displayed with the separator (|, by default) character between each field value. The default.

From inside the command line this can be also changed using the mode command:

.mode MODE ?TABLE? Set output mode where MODE is one of:

csv Comma-separated values

column Left-aligned columns. (See .width)

html HTML code

insert SQL insert statements for TABLE

line One value per line

list Values delimited by .separator string

tabs Tab-separated values

tcl TCL list elements

for i in 192.168.1.{61..71};do ping -c 1 $i &> /dev/null && echo $i;fi;done
2009-08-26 06:04:24
User: AlecSchueler
Functions: echo ping
Tags: Network ssh bash
-2

If you need to ssh into a computer on the local network but you're unsure of the ip to use, then ping them and see if you get a response. If you do, print out the address you got it from. Adjust the range to suit your network.