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Terminal - All commands - 11,859 results
col1(){ case $# in 0)echo col1 col-length;;*) sed 's/\(.\{'"$1"'\}\)\(.*\)/\1/' esac;}
2011-12-30 23:35:29
User: argv
Functions: sed
-3

for small output only

example usage:

jobs -l |col1 72

sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 1
ps ux|grep <process name>|awk '{print $2}'|xargs -n 1 kill
removedir () { echo "Deleting the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
2010-01-17 11:34:38
User: oshazard
Functions: basename cd echo read rm sed
-3

CHANGELOG

Version 1.1

removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }

BUG FIX:

Folders with spaces

Version 1.0

removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }

BUG FIX:

Hidden directories (.dotdirectory)

Version 0.9

rmdir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD. Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }

Removes current directory with recursive and force flags plus basic human check. When prompted type yes

1. [user@host ~]$ ls

foo bar

2. [user@host ~]$ cd foo

3. [user@host foo]$ removedir

4. yes

5. rm -Rf foo/

6. [user@host ~]$

7. [user@host ~]$ ls

bar

cat .ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh user@server "cat >>.ssh/authorized_keys2"
trap '' 1 2 20 24(signal number)
tail -n 20 ~/Library/Logs/FileSyncAgent.log
2009-02-19 05:05:21
User: sacrilicious
Functions: tail
-3

tail would be considered dull, but pair this with being able to push out unix commands over ARD, and life gets easier. (Same can be said for my TimeMachine scrape command, http://xrl.us/begrzb)

find directory -maxdepth 1 -iname "*" | awk 'NR >= 2'
2014-04-01 00:09:12
User: chilicuil
Functions: awk find
-3

find . -maxdepth 1 -iname ".*" | awk 'NR >= 2'

Can be used to list only dotfiles without . nor ..

(cd /bin; set -- *; x=$((1+($RANDOM % $#))); man ${!x})
num_lines=${1:-42}
2012-02-10 06:24:20
User: f4m8
-3

Very similar but no use of `tr` for

function liner() {

local num_lines=${1:-42}

local line=$(printf %${num_lines}s)

echo ${line// /#}

}

v () { echo "$@"; "$@"; }
2011-10-13 11:33:19
User: hfs
Functions: echo
-3

You can use this in shell scripts to show which commands are actually run. Just prepend every "critical line" with "v˽".

$TMP=/tmp

echo "Let me create a directory for you"

v mkdir $TMP/new

In scripts this can be more useful than "set -x", because that can be very verbose with variable assignments etc.

Another nice use is if you prepend every "critical" command with "v", then you can test your script by commenting out the actual execution.

renice -20 -g 2874 (2784 found with ps -Aj)
iptables -L -n -v
mkpasswd() { head -c $(($1)) /dev/urandom | uuencode - | sed -n 's/.//;2s/\(.\{'$1'\}\).*/\1/p' ;}
2009-11-19 14:27:52
User: taliver
Functions: head sed uuencode
-3

This uses urandom to produce a random password. The random values are uuencoded to ensure only printable characters. This only works for a number of characters between 1 and 60.

for /f "delims==" %a in (' dir "%USERPROFILE%\*.sqlite" /s/b ') do echo vacuum;|"sqlite3.exe" "%a"
2010-01-18 20:56:00
User: vutcovici
Functions: dir echo
-3

This command defragment the SQLite databases found in the home folder of the current Windows user.

This is usefull to speed up Firefox startup.

The executable sqlite3.exe must be located in PATH or in the current folder.

In a script use:

for /f "delims==" %%a in (' dir "%USERPROFILE%\*.sqlite" /s/b ') do echo vacuum;|"sqlite3.exe" "%%a"
alias cstdin='echo "Ctrl-D when done." && gcc -Wall -o ~/.stdin.exe ~/.stdin.c && ~/.stdin.exe'
2009-11-19 16:38:51
User: taliver
Functions: alias gcc
-3

This is a quick hack to make a gcc caller. Since it runs with gcc instead of tcc, it's a bit more trustworthy as far as the final answers of things go.

man $(ls -1 /usr/share/man/man?/ | shuf -n1 | cut -d. -f1)
2010-08-20 23:36:10
User: dooblem
Functions: cut ls man
Tags: man sort shuf
-3

Another one.

Maybe not the quicker because of the sort command, but it will also look in other man sections.

updated with goodevilgenius 'shuf' idea

mkdir `date | sed 's/[: ]/_/g'`
2009-04-29 21:28:45
User: copremesis
Functions: mkdir sed
-4

use today's time stamp to make a unique directory for today or an hour ago ...

echo -e "HEAD / HTTP/1.1\nHost: slashdot.org\n\n" | nc slashdot.org 80 | head -n5 | tail -1 | cut -f2 -d-
gst123 -z **/*
2010-05-18 13:45:41
User: eolo999
Tags: music zsh gst123
-4

Depends on zsh and gst123 ( http://space.twc.de/~stefan/gst123.php )

cd in_your_music_root_folder and then issue the command

for i in $(tar -tf <file.tar.gz>); do rm $i; done;
2009-07-06 19:57:23
User: din7
Functions: rm tar
-4

Remove annoying improperly packaged files that untar into the incorrect directory.

Example, When you untar and it extracts hundreds of files into the current directory.... bleh.

apropos keyword
cat file1 ... fileN > combinedFile;
2010-04-17 01:00:04
User: GinoMan2440
Functions: cat
Tags: cat bash Linux
-4

the last person who posted used the most roundabout way to concatinate files, there's a reason there's a "conCATinate" command... Using this method, you also get to choose the order of the files, below another person just did *.txt > combined.txt which is fine but the order depends on the implementation of "cat" which is probably alphabetical order of filenames.

top -b -n 1 |grep httpd|wc -l
2010-07-25 08:40:03
User: dotanmazor
Functions: grep top wc
-4

Of course, the httpd can be replaced with any other process name

while sleep 1; do date; (netstat -a -n | grep 80) ; done