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Terminal - All commands - 11,611 results
unlink <linkname>
2009-03-12 01:52:24
User: topgun553
Functions: unlink
-4

if you had a symbolic link called "oldLink" in the current folder then you would want to do

unlink oldLink

http://goosh.org
2009-08-29 12:19:34
User: unixbhaskar
Tags: web browser
-4

You can try it . Nice shell interface to search google from the command line.Visit http://goosh.org in your browser.

find . -type f | while read f; do chmod -x "$f"; done
moon-buggy
2009-04-22 05:41:40
User: eastwind
-4

sudo apt-get install moon-buggy

An ascii 2D game where you control a mooncar and try to avoid moonhole by jumping (press space )

VARIABLE="VALUE" COMMAND
2009-03-12 07:04:44
User: magmax
-4

Allows you to change the value of an environment variable only for the execution of the command in the line. (corrected)

sed -i -n '/%/p' *.php
head -$(($RANDOM % $(wc -l < file.txt) +1 )) file.txt | tail -1
export HISTFILE=/dev/null/
2010-06-10 18:48:43
User: thund3rpants
Functions: export
-4

This command is great for dumping your history so that when you're working on a system that is under a shared account, you can keep others from reviewing your history file. I use this when I'm just visiting a system to diagnose a problem, or to make a quick fix.

ps aux | grep process-name | grep -v "grep"
dd if=/dev/sda of=~/backup-disk-YY-MM-DD.img
2010-09-14 11:14:14
Functions: dd
-4

Change /dev/sda with the Disk or partition you want to back-up

To restore use:

dd if=~/backup-disk-YY-MM-DD.img of=/dev/sda

Once again change /dev/sda accordingly

Source: http://www.go2linux.org/linux/2010/09/small-tip-back-disks-clone-hard-disk-773

/bin/ls *.png | xargs -l1 -I {} convert {} -modulate 100,100,70 ../../icons/32x32/{}
mvn -Dmaven.test.skip=true install
2009-05-20 12:55:10
User: sharfah
Tags: maven
-4

the maven.test.skip property can be added to other goals too.

ls | while read -r FILE; do mv -v "$FILE" `echo "prependtext$FILE" `; done
2010-08-14 14:19:18
User: IgnitionWeb
Functions: ls mv read
Tags: echo mv prepen
-4

Prepends all directory items with "prependtext"

for i in *; do mv $i prependtext$i; done
grep -iR find_me ./
2009-02-18 15:38:59
User: lfamorim
Functions: grep
-4

Searching for a String in Multiple Files With Grep

m-a a-i open-vm
2009-04-22 20:08:00
User: m03hr3
-4

compile and install openvm-tools module in debian lenny

finger @www.linuxbanks.cn | grep -oE '([[:digit:]]{1,3}\.){3}[[:digit:]]{1,3}' | head -n1
2010-05-05 14:58:55
User: zhangweiwu
Functions: finger grep head
Tags: ip address
-4

This is useful when you got a reserved IP address like 192.168.0.100 and want to find out what IP address is used to access the Internet. You have to know a server with 'efingerd -n' configured, like www.linuxbanks.cn as above.

Other method to find out this information are for example access www.tell-my-ip.com and grep the output. The finger method have the advantage that it is easy to deploy a service like www.tell-my-ip.com, as you only need to get efingerd installed.

for /F %G in ('dir /b c:\Windows\system32\notepad.exe') do ( echo %G )
shuf file.txt | head -n 1
xterm -e "cd /my/directory; bash"
2009-10-13 12:06:14
User: kekschaot
-4

Usefull e.g. in krusader open terminal function

( cd /my/directory; xterm& )
2009-10-13 13:07:21
User: ashawley
Functions: cd
Tags: subshells
-4

Perfect time for the rarely used sub shell.

aptitude purge linux-image | grep ^i | grep -v $(uname -r)
sleep 4h && halt
uname -m # display machine "hardware name"
2013-01-04 11:46:43
User: mpb
Functions: uname
-4

Display the machine "hardware name" 32 or 64 bit.

"x86_64" is shown on 64 bit machines

"i686" is typically shown on 32 bit machines (although, you might also see "i386" or "i586" on older Linuxen).

On other "unix-like" systems, other hardware names will be displayed.

For example, on AIX, "uname -m" gives the "machine sequence number".

For whatever reason, IBM decided that "uname -M" would give the machine type and model.

(ref: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-aix-systemid.html )

On Sun Solaris, "uname -m" can be used to determine the chip type and "isainfo -v" will reveal

if the kernel is 64 or 32 bit.

(ref: http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/packages/solaris/sparc/html/32.and.64.bit.packages.html )

A more reliable way to determine "64-bit ness" across different Unix type systems is to compile the following simple C program:

cat <<eeooff > bits.c

/*

* program bits.c

* purpose Display "32" or "64" according to machine type

* written January 2013

* reference http://www.unix.org/whitepapers/64bit.html

*/

/* hmm, curious that angle-brackets removed by commandlinefu.com data input processing? */

#include "/usr/include/stdio.h"

long lv = 0xFFFFFFFF;

main ( ) {

printf("%2d\n",(lv < 0)?32:64);

}

eeooff

Compile and run thusly: cc -o bits bits.c; ./bits

<command> 2> <file>