Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Universal configuration monitoring and system of record for IT.
Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!
Hide

Top Tags

Hide

Functions

Hide

Credits

All commands from sorted by
Terminal - All commands - 12,177 results
hex() { echo $1 16op | dc; }
git add -u
echo "<?php phpinfo(); ?>" >> /srv/www/htdocs/test.php
curl http://ipecho.net/plain
xcopy /e/h/y /z/i /k /f src dest
2009-02-13 16:25:09
User: piyo
-3

I can remember "cp -av" on Unix like systems to copy files and directories. The same can be done on Windows without extra software, somewhat.

The switches mean:

/E Copies directories and subdirectories, including empty ones.

Same as /S /E. May be used to modify /T.

/H Copies hidden and system files also.

/Y Suppresses prompting to confirm you want to overwrite an

existing destination file.

/Z Copies networked files in restartable mode.

/I If destination does not exist and copying more than one file,

assumes that destination must be a directory.

/K Copies attributes. Normal Xcopy will reset read-only attributes.

/F Displays full source and destination file names while copying.

I don't type that all the time, I stick it into a file called "cpav.cmd" and run that.

echo xcopy /e/h/y /z/i /k /f %1 %2 > cpav.cmd cpav zsh zsh2

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323007

ls -1 | awk 'BEGIN{srand()} {x[NR] = $0} END{print "Selected", x[1 + int(rand() * NR)]}'
2011-03-13 20:05:06
User: saibbot
Functions: awk ls
Tags: awk random
-3

I use this command to select a random movie from my movie collection..

while true ; do sleep 1 ; clear ; (netstat -tn | grep -P ':36089\s+\d') ; done
2011-09-28 11:39:43
User: hute37
Functions: clear grep netstat sleep true
-3

shell loop to scan netstat output avoiding loolback aliases (local/remote swap for local connections)

tac ~/.bash_history | grep -w
2013-09-07 15:53:30
User: hamsolo474
Functions: grep tac
-3

greps your bash history for whatever you type in at the end returning it in reverse chronological order (most recent invocations first), should work on all distros.

works well as an alias

yes '' | head -n100
sed 's/#.*//' /etc/fstab | column -t
FOR /F "tokens=3* delims=[]=" %A IN ('SET ARRAY[') DO ( echo %A )
2010-08-10 12:08:26
User: Marco
Functions: echo
-3

This command loops over all indexes of the system variable array ARRAY[] and puts its content into %A.

Create this array before, e.g. by

set ARRAY[0]=test1

and

set ARRAY[1]=test2

For using inside of a batch file, write %%A instead of %A.

IFS=$'\n'; LIST=`ls -1`; let TOT=`echo $LIST | wc -w`-1 ; array=($LIST); echo "Selected ${array[ ($RANDOM % $TOT) ]}"
2011-03-13 21:30:44
User: ntropia
Functions: echo wc
Tags: bash random
-3

The same thing using only Bash built-in's.

For readability I've kept the variables out, but it could me made extremely more compact (and totally unreadable!) by stuffing everything inside the single echo command.

alias grip="grep -i"
2009-07-21 11:12:15
User: inof
Functions: alias
-3

This is *NOT* about the -i option in grep. I guess everybody already knows that option. This is about the basic rule of life that the simplest things are sometimes the best. ;-)

One day when I used "grep -i" for the umpteenth time, I decided to make this alias, and I've used it ever since, probably more often than plain grep. (In fact I also have aliases egrip and fgrip defined accordingly. I also have wrip="grep -wi" but I don't use this one that often.)

If you vote this down because it's too trivial and simplistic, that's no problem. I understand that. But still this is really one of my most favourite aliases.

echo Selected $(ls -1 | sort -R | head -n 1)
ls -l !* | /usr/bin/grep '^d'
find . -type d -print0 | xargs -0 du -s | sort -n | tail -10 | cut -f2 | xargs -I{} du -sh {} | sort -rn
cat file_with_tabs.txt | perl -pe 's/\t/ /g'
2010-07-11 13:01:22
User: nikc
Functions: cat perl
Tags: cat perl replace
-3

Replaces tabs in output with spaces. Uses perl since sed seems to work differently across platforms.

awk 'BEGIN {srand()} {print int(rand()*1000000) "\t" $0}' FILE | sort -n | cut -f 2-
2009-04-19 20:04:58
User: udim
Functions: awk cut sort
-3

Replace FILE with a filename (or - for stdin).

declare -i aa ; aa=3*8 ; echo $aa
ip addr|grep "inet "
2009-07-22 07:38:06
User: RickDeckardt
Functions: grep
-3

Shows a single line per interface (device), with its IPv4 settings.

Shorter command, better readability in output.

slocate filename/dirname
2009-08-29 03:28:08
User: unixbhaskar
Functions: slocate
-3

After you install slocate ,the first thing you have to do with it to initialise the database by issuing a command " slocate -u" . And then onwards just give the filename or dirname as a argument to the slocate command will reveal the files/dirs location in the system along with path.Moreover over it's an securely way of looking into the file system.

file -L <library> | grep -q '64-bit' && echo 'library is 64 bit' || echo 'library is 32 bit'
2010-03-07 06:31:35
User: infinull
Functions: echo file grep
Tags: bash
-3

file displays a files type

the -L flag means follow sym-links (as libraries are often sym-linked to another this behavior is likely preferred)

more complex behavior (*two* grep commands!) could be used to determine if the file is or is not a shared library.

vipw
2009-08-29 03:46:42
User: unixbhaskar
Tags: Security shell
-3

Now a bit of explanation required for this command.Once you type the command it opens up an vi editor with an temporary file enlisting the password file information .So if you make an change it will not reflected in the passwd file until you save the file.The reason behind using this command over other way to view the password file in network environment is that it locks the password file when you start working with it.So no one can temper with it during that period.Once you are done(means you save the tmp file) ,it will release the lock associated with it.I think it's a better mechanism to view the sensitive data like passwd file.Never ever use other tool like cat, nano or any other means.

<alt+50>-
2010-01-07 15:32:47
User: kobayashison
-3

In bash, by pressing ALT+n and then a character x, x will be printed n times

I know is not the same as the original command, but is correlated.