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Commands matching rsync from sorted by
Terminal - Commands matching rsync - 56 results
ssh -MNf <user>@<host>
2009-02-26 14:11:19
User: raphink
Functions: ssh
40

Create a persistent SSH connection to the host in the background. Combine this with settings in your ~/.ssh/config:

Host host

ControlPath ~/.ssh/master-%r@%h:%p

ControlMaster no

All the SSH connections to the machine will then go through the persisten SSH socket. This is very useful if you are using SSH to synchronize files (using rsync/sftp/cvs/svn) on a regular basis because it won't create a new socket each time to open an ssh connection.

rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $file_source $user@$host:$destination_file
2009-04-01 13:13:14
User: dr_gogeta86
Functions: rsync
23

It can resume a failed secure copy ( usefull when you transfer big files like db dumps through vpn ) using rsync.

It requires rsync installed in both hosts.

rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $file_source $user@$host:$destination_file local -> remote

or

rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $user@$host:$remote_file $destination_file remote -> local

rsync --rsync-path 'sudo rsync' username@source:/folder/ /local/
2009-03-25 21:18:55
User: Alioth
Functions: rsync
Tags: rsync
18

If your user has sudo on the remote box, you can rsync data as root without needing to login as root. This is very helpful if the remote box does not allow root to login over SSH (which is a common security restriction).

rsync --progress --partial --rsh="ssh -p 8322" --bwlimit=100 --ipv4 user@domain.com:~/file.tgz .
2011-02-10 14:25:22
User: ruslan
Functions: rsync
16

The command copies a file from remote SSH host on port 8322 with bandwidth limit 100KB/sec;

--progress shows a progress bar

--partial turns partial download on; thus, you can resume the process if something goes wrong

--bwlimit limits bandwidth by specified KB/sec

--ipv4 selects IPv4 as preferred

I find it useful to create the following alias:

alias myscp='rsync --progress --partial --rsh="ssh -p 8322" --bwlimit=100 --ipv4'

in ~/.bash_aliases, ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login or ~/.bashrc where appropriate.

rsync --progress file1 file2
rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh SOURCE DESTINATION
2009-02-16 16:22:10
User: episodeiv
Functions: rsync
14

Put it into your sh startup script (I use

alias scpresume='rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh'

in bash). When a file transfer via scp has aborted, just use scpresume instead of scp and rsync will copy only the parts of the file that haven't yet been transmitted.

rsync -az /home/user/test user@sshServer:/tmp/
2009-08-25 10:45:15
User: peshay
Functions: rsync
Tags: ssh file move
14

copy files to a ssh server with gzip compression

<ctrl+e> <esc+t>
2012-03-11 07:49:09
User: bibe
13

Say you just typed a long command like this:

rsync -navupogz --delete /long/path/to/dir_a /very/long/path/to/dir_b

but you really want to sync dir_b to dir_a. Instead of rewriting all the command line, just type followed by , and your command line will read

rsync -navupogz --delete /very/long/path/to/dir_b /long/path/to/dir_a
rsync -rtvu --modify-window=1 --progress /media/SOURCE/ /media/TARGET/
2009-07-05 07:40:10
User: 0x2142
Functions: rsync
Tags: backup rsync
12

This will backup the _contents_ of /media/SOURCE to /media/TARGET where TARGET is formatted with ntfs. The --modify-window lets rsync ignore the less accurate timestamps of NTFS.

find . -name "whatever.*" -print0 | rsync -av --files-from=- --from0 ./ ./destination/
tar -czvf - /src/dir | ssh remotehost "(cd /dst/dir ; tar -xzvf -)"
rsync -rv <src> <dst> --progress
2011-08-05 09:29:12
User: fecub
Functions: rsync
10

-r for recursive (if you want to copy entire directories)

src for the source file (or wildcards)

dst for the destination

--progress to show a progress bar

rsync -aHAXxv --numeric-ids --delete --progress -e "ssh -T -c arcfour -o Compression=no -x" user@<source>:<source_dir> <dest_dir>
2012-12-26 13:46:23
User: somaddict
Functions: rsync
Tags: ssh rsync
8

This creates an archive that does the following:

rsync::

(Everyone seems to like -z, but it is much slower for me)

-a: archive mode - rescursive, preserves owner, preserves permissions, preserves modification times, preserves group, copies symlinks as symlinks, preserves device files.

-H: preserves hard-links

-A: preserves ACLs

-X: preserves extended attributes

-x: don't cross file-system boundaries

-v: increase verbosity

--numeric-ds: don't map uid/gid values by user/group name

--delete: delete extraneous files from dest dirs (differential clean-up during sync)

--progress: show progress during transfer

ssh::

-T: turn off pseudo-tty to decrease cpu load on destination.

-c arcfour: use the weakest but fastest SSH encryption. Must specify "Ciphers arcfour" in sshd_config on destination.

-o Compression=no: Turn off SSH compression.

-x: turn off X forwarding if it is on by default.

Flip: rsync -aHAXxv --numeric-ids --delete --progress -e "ssh -T -c arcfour -o Compression=no -x" [source_dir] [dest_host:/dest_dir]

rsync -v -r --size-only --compare-dest=../A/ B/ C/
2013-09-10 21:41:16
User: knoppix5
Functions: rsync
8

Assumed dir A, B, C are subdirs of the current dir

Exact syntax of the command is:

rsync -v -r --size-only --compare-dest=/path_to_A/A/ /path_to_B/B/ /path_to_C/C/

(do not omit end-slashes, since that would copy only the names and not the contents of subdirs of dir B to dir C)

You can replace --size-only with --checksum for more thorough file differences validation

Useful switch:

-n, --dry-run perform a trial run with no changes made

rsync -av --progress ./file.txt user@host:/path/to/dir
2009-02-06 11:51:51
User: aoiaoi
Functions: rsync
7

transfer files from localhost to a remotehost.

rsync -e "/usr/bin/ssh -p22" -a --progress --stats --delete -l -z -v -r -p /root/files/ user@remote_server:/root/files/
2009-02-11 02:44:00
User: storm
Functions: rsync
7

Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22)

(all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

curlftpfs ftp://YourUsername:YourPassword@YourFTPServerURL /tmp/remote-website/ && rsync -av /tmp/remote-website/* /usr/local/data_latest && umount /tmp/remote-website
2009-03-31 18:01:00
User: nadavkav
Functions: rsync umount
7

connect to a remote server using ftp protocol over FUSE file system, then rsync the remote folder to a local one and then unmount the remote ftp server (FUSE FS)

it can be divided to 3 different commands and you should have curlftpfs and rsync installed

rsync -a /etc /destination
2011-10-18 13:07:55
User: atoponce
Functions: rsync
Tags: rsync
7

Yes, rsync(1) supports local directories. And, should anything change, it's trivial to run the command again, and grab only the changes, instead of the full directory.

rsync -ayz -e ssh --exclude=/proc --exclude=/sys --exclude=/dev / root@NEWHOST:/MNTDIR
2012-11-06 09:43:42
User: bones
Functions: rsync ssh
7

Copies the complete root-dir of a linux server to another one, where the new harddisks formated and mountet. Very useful to migrate a root-server to another one.

rsync -avz -e ssh --files-from=<(find -mtime +30 -mtime -60) source dest
2009-03-13 12:58:28
User: voyeg3r
Functions: find rsync ssh
6

rsync from source to dest all between >30

rsync -a --delete --link-dest=../lastbackup $folder $dname/
2009-08-04 07:08:54
User: pamirian
Functions: rsync
6

dname is a directory named something like 20090803 for Aug 3, 2009. lastbackup is a soft link to the last backup made - say 20090802. $folder is the folder being backed up. Because this uses hard linking, files that already exist and haven't changed take up almost no space yet each date directory has a kind of "snapshot" of that day's files. Naturally, lastbackup needs to be updated after this operation. I must say that I can't take credit for this gem; I picked it up from somewhere on the net so long ago I don't remember where from anymore. Ah, well...

Systems that are only somewhat slicker than this costs hundreds or even thousands of dollars - but we're HACKERS! We don't need no steenkin' commercial software... :)

rsync -avz -e 'ssh -A sshproxy ssh' srcdir remhost:dest/path/
2009-03-25 21:29:07
User: totoro
Functions: rsync
5

If you have lots of remote hosts sitting "behind" an ssh proxy host, then there is a special-case use of "rsynch" that allows one to easily copy directories and files across the ssh proxy host, without having to do two explicit copies: the '-e' option allows for a replacement "rsh" command. We use this option to specify an "ssh" tunnel command, with the '-A' option that causes authentication agent requests to be forwarded back to the local host. If you have ssh set up correctly, the above command can be done without any passwords being entered.

0 10 * * * rsync -rau /[VIPdirectory] X.X.X.X:/backup/[VIPdirectory]
2010-03-02 17:48:54
User: mack
Functions: rsync
5

With this cron, rsync begins to sinchronize the contents of the local directory on /[VIPdirectory] with the directory /backup/[VIPdirectory] on the remote server X.X.X.X. Previously we need working on public/private-keys ssh to guarantee the acces to the remote server on X.X.X.X

rsync -rv --include '*/' --include '*.txt' --exclude '*' srcDir/ desDir/
alias z='zenity --info --text="You will not believe it, but your command has finished now! :-)" --display :0.0'
2009-08-03 16:38:29
User: bubo
Functions: alias
4

tired of switching to the console to check if some command has finished yet? if notify-send does not work on your box try this one... e.g. rsync -av -e /usr/bin/lsh $HOME slowconnection.bar:/mnt/backup ; z (now fire up X, do something useful, get notified if this stuff has finished).