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Commands tagged perl from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged perl - 167 results
for f in `find . -name "*.php"`; do perl -p -i.bak -e 's/<\?php \/\*\*\/ eval\(base64_decode\(\"[^\"]+"\)\);\?>//' $f; done
2012-03-12 10:44:33
User: lizuka
Functions: perl
0

loop through files in .php extension

make a .bak of each of them

find the base64_decode function and remove it

curl -s -d "CSField=Name" -d "CSInput=BostonUCompSci" http://torstatus.blutmagie.de/index.php | grep -oP "ip=\K(\d+)(\.\d+){3}"
2012-03-09 16:52:27
User: JisSey
Functions: grep
0

Reciprocally, we could get the node name from a give Tor IP address =>

ip2node() { curl -s -d "QueryIP=$1" http://torstatus.blutmagie.de/tor_exit_query.php | grep -oP "Server name:.*'>\K\w+" ; }

ip2node 204.8.156.142

BostonUCompSci

perl -e "print 'yes' if `exim -bt $s_email_here | grep -c malformed`;"
2012-02-28 04:42:41
User: DewiMorgan
Functions: perl
0

People are *going* to post the wrong ways to do this. It's one of the most common form-validation tasks, and also one of the most commonly messed up. Using a third party tool or library like exim means that you are future-proofing yourself against changes to the email standard, and protecting yourself against the fact that actually checking whether an email address is valid is *not possible*.

Still, perhaps your boss is insisting you really do need to check them internally. OK.

Read the RFCs. The bet before the @ is specified by RFC2821 and RFC2822. The domain name part is specified by RFC1035, RFC1101, RFC1123 and RFC2181.

Generally, when people say "email address", they mean that part of the address that the RFC terms the "addr-spec": the "blah@domain.tld" address, with no display names, comments, quotes, etc. Also "root@localhost" and "root" should be invalid, as should arbitrary addressing schemes specified by a protocol indicator, like "jimbo@myprotocol:foo^bar^baz".

So... With the smallest poetic license for readability (allowing underscores in domain names so we can use "\w" instead of "[a-z0-9]"), the RFCs give us:

^(?:"(?:[^"\\]|\\.)+"|[-^!#\$%&'*+\/=?`{|}~.\w]+)@(?=.{3,255}$)(?:[\w][\w-]{0,62}\.){1,128}[\w][\w-]{0,62}$

Not perfect, but the best I can come up with, and most compliant I've found. I'd be interested to see other people's ideas, though. It's still not going to verify you an address fersure, properly, 100% guaranteed legit, though. What else can you do? Well, you could also:

* verify that the address is either a correct dotted-decimal IP, or contains letters.

* remove reserved domains (.localhost, .example, .test, .invalid), reserved IP ranges, and so forth from the address.

* check for banned domains (whitehouse.gov, example.com...)

* check for known TLDs including alt tlds.

* see if the domain has an MX record set up: if so, connect to that host, else connect to the domain.

* see if the given address is accepted by the server as a recipient or sender (this fails for yahoo.*, which blocks after a few attempts, assuming you are a spammer, and for other domains like rediffmail.com, home.com).

But these are moving well out of the realm of generic regex checks and into the realm of application-specific stuff that should be done in code instead - especially the latter two. Hopefully, this is all you needed to point out to your boss "hey, email validation this is a dark pit with no bottom, we really just want to do a basic check, then send them an email with a link in it: it's the industry standard solution."

Of course, if you want to go nuts, here's an idea that you could do. Wouldn't like to do it myself, though: I'd rather just trust them until their mail bounces too many times. But if you want it, this (untested) code checks to see if the mail domain works. It's based on a script by John Coggeshall and Jesse Houwing that also asked the server if the specific email address existed, but I disliked that idea for several reasons. I suspect: it will get you blocked as a spambot address harvester pretty quick; a lot of servers would lie to you; it would take too much time; this way you can cache domains marked as "OK"; and I suspect it would add little to the reliability test.

// Based on work by: John Coggeshall and Jesse Houwing.

// http://www.zend.com/zend/spotlight/ev12apr.php

mailRegex = '^(?:"(?:[^"\\\\]|\\\\.)+"|[-^!#\$%&\'*+\/=?`{|}~.\w]+)';

mailRegex .= '@(?=.{3,255}$)(?:[\w][\w-]{0,62}\.){1,128}[\w][\w-]{0,62}$';

function ValidateMail($address) {

  global $mailRegex; // Yes, globals are evil. Put it inline if you want.

  if (!preg_match($mailRegex)) {

    return false;

  }

  list ( $localPart, $Domain ) = split ("@",$Email);

  // connect to the first available MX record, or to domain if no MX record.

  $ConnectAddress = new Array();

  if (getmxrr($Domain, $MXHost)) {

    $ConnectAddress = $MXHost;

  } else {

    $ConnectAddress[0] = $Domain;

  }

  // check all MX records in case main server is down - may take time!

  for ($i=0; $i < count($ConnectAddress); $i++ ) {

    $Connect = fsockopen ( $ConnectAddress[$i], 25 );

    if ($Connect){

      break;

    }

  }

  if ($Connect) {

    socket_set_blocking($Connect,0);

    // Only works if socket_blocking is off.

    if (ereg("^220", $Out = fgets($Connect, 1024))) {

      fclose($Connect); // Unneeded, but let's help the gc.

      return true;

    }

    fclose($Connect); // Help the gc.

  }

  return false;

}

open R,"curl -s http://feeds2.feedburner.com/Command-line-fu|xml2|"; while(<R>){ chomp; m(^/rss/channel/item/title=) and do{ s/^.*?=//; ($t,$d,$l)=($_,undef,undef) }; m(^/rss/channel/item/description=) and do{ s/^.*?=//; push @d,$_ }; m(^/rss/channel/item
svn st | awk ' {if ( $1 == "?" ){print $1="",$0}} ' | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed 's/ /\\ /g' | perl -ne '`svn add ${1}@` if /(.*)(@*)(.*)/'
2012-02-23 18:42:02
Functions: awk perl sed
Tags: svn perl
0

handels @, ?, whitespaces in names.

replace "?" and "add" by "!" and "rm" for svn mass remove.

---> I m looking for a nicer way to write it, perhaps with something using " perl -ne '`blahblah` if /\?(.*)/' "

tail -f production.log | perl -ne 'if (/^Completed.in.(\d+)/){$d = int($1/1000);print "\n";$f{$d}++;for $t (sort(keys(%f))){print $t."s: ".$f{$t}."\n"}}'
2012-02-23 14:37:33
User: theist
Functions: perl tail
0

Commandline perl filter for, using a production.log from a rails app, display on realtime the count of requests grouped by "seconds to complete" (gross round, but fair enough for an oneliner) :)

perl -le 'print ~~ map {-s} <*>'
2012-02-21 21:09:48
User: MarxBro
Functions: perl
Tags: perl find wc
7

Just want to post a Perl alternative.

Does not count hidden files ('.' ones).

genRandomText() { perl -e '$n=shift; print chr(int(rand(26)) + 97) for 1..$n; print "\n"' $1;}
2012-01-21 00:21:20
User: putnamhill
Functions: perl
-1

If you don't have seq, you can use perl.

tail -f to.log | colorize.pl +l10:".*" &
2012-01-20 21:46:47
User: peter4512
Functions: tail
Tags: perl
-4

(follow with next command)

tail -f from.log | colorize.pl +l20:".*" &

Use with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10031/intercept-monitor-and-manipulate-a-tcp-connection. - can use to view output of tees that send traffic to files - output will be interwoven with red for sent traffic and green for received.

get colorize.pl from http://www.flinkmann.de/71-1-Colorizepl.html

alias path="/usr/bin/perl -e 'use Cwd; foreach my \$file (@ARGV) {print Cwd::abs_path(\$file) .\"\n\" if(-e \$file);}'"
2012-01-18 01:40:05
User: espider1
Functions: alias
1

The command creates an alias called 'path', so it's useful to add it to your .profile or .bash_profile. The path command then prints the full path of any file, directory, or list of files given. Soft links will be resolved to their true location. This is especially useful if you use scp often to copy files across systems. Now rather then using pwd to get a directory, and then doing a separate cut and paste to get a file's name, you can just type 'path file' and get the full path in one operation.

perl -p -i -e 's/.*\n//g if $.==2' ~/.ssh/known_hosts
perl -le 'print$_%3?$_%5?$_:"Buzz":$_%5?"Fizz":"FizzBuzz"for 1..100'
find . -type f|perl -lne '@x=sort {$b->[0]<=>$a->[0]}[(stat($_))[7],$_],@x;splice(@x,11);print "@{$x[0]}";END{for(@x){print "@$_"}'
2012-01-08 14:43:43
User: bazzargh
Functions: find perl
Tags: sort perl find
-2

A different approach to the problem - maintain a small sorted list, print the largest as we go, then the top 10 at the end. I often find that the find and sort take a long time, and the large file might appear near the start of the find. By printing as we go, I get better feedback. The sort used in this will be much slower on perls older than 5.8.

perl -e '$f = join("", <>); for (0..127) {$_ = chr($_); if (/[[:print:]]/) {print if index($f, $_) < 0}} print "\n"'
2012-01-05 23:38:06
User: putnamhill
Functions: perl
Tags: perl slurp
0

Here's a perl version that only considers printable characters. Change the regex /[[:print:]]/ to look for different sets of delimiter characters.

perl -e "binmode(STDOUT, ':utf8'); print \"$@\""; echo # newline
2012-01-02 10:34:51
User: mathias
Functions: echo perl
0

This is especially useful to get crazy stuff like space characters copied to your pasteboard correctly.

Source: https://github.com/mathiasbynens/dotfiles/blob/master/.functions

perl -ne 's/\^.{1,7}?m//g;print'
2012-01-02 01:32:33
User: Tracerneo
Functions: perl
Tags: perl regex colors
-1

Removes special characters (colors) in '^]]Xm' and '^]]X;Ym' format from file.

Use pipe ('input | perl [...]') or stream ('perl [...]

You can use 'cat -v infile' as 'input' to show special characters instead of interpreting (there is problem with non-ASCII chars, they are replaced by M-[char]).

mplayer -endpos 0.1 -vo null -ao null -identify *.avi 2>&1 |grep ID_LENGTH |cut -d = -f 2|awk '{SUM += $1} END { printf "%d:%d:%d\n",SUM/3600,SUM%3600/60,SUM%60}'
lsmod | perl -e 'print "digraph \"lsmod\" {";<>;while(<>){@_=split/\s+/; print "\"$_[0]\" -> \"$_\"\n" for split/,/,$_[3]}print "}"' | dot -Tpng | display -
2011-11-27 14:02:35
User: bandie91
Functions: dot lsmod perl
35

parse `lsmod' output and pass to `dot' drawing utility then finally pass it to an image viewer

mech-dump --links --absolute http://www.commandlinefu.com
2011-11-19 03:40:52
User: sputnick
Tags: perl html parsing
2

You need to install WWW::Mechanize Perl module with

# cpan -i WWW::Mezchanize

or by searching mechanize | grep perl in your package manager

With this command, you can get forms, images, headers too

perl -MO=Deparse filename.pl | perltidy > new.pl
2011-11-16 18:54:30
User: kimmel
Functions: perl
0

This will create a new file with proper code formatting and all comments removed.

perl -le 'print scalar gmtime shift' 1234567890
perl -MExtUtils::Installed -E 'say for ExtUtils::Installed->new()->modules()'
2011-11-16 17:26:47
User: kimmel
Functions: perl
Tags: perl oneliner
0

Lists all the modules that were installed the "proper way". It also uses Perl 5.10(or higher)'s say command for less typing.

for k in `git branch|sed s/^..//`;do echo -e `git log -1 --pretty=format:"%Cgreen%ci %Cblue%cr%Creset" "$k" --`\\t"$k";done|sort
2011-11-02 06:16:22
User: ryan
Functions: echo sed
1

This fixes a bug found in the other scripts which fail when a branch has the same name as a file or directory in the current directory.

perl -ane 'END{printf(" %d %d %d\n", $x, $y, $z)} $x+=1; $y+=@F; $z+=length' file.txt
svn log | perl -pe 's/\n//g => s/^-.*/\n/g'
2011-10-20 01:20:52
User: dbr
Functions: perl
Tags: svn perl svn log
0

dirrrty: use -p to chomp automatically, substitute all newlines away and then replace the "---" by a newline ? bingo!

s/// => s/// is just a cooler way to write s///, s/// which is just the small brother of s///; s/// (comma is an operator!)

have fun!