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Commands tagged sed from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged sed - 337 results
sed -ne '/^Package: \(.*\)/{s//\1/;h;};/^Installed-Size: \(.*\)/{s//\1/;G;s/\n/ /;p;}' /var/lib/dpkg/status | sort -rn
2009-10-19 19:01:17
User: arcege
Functions: sed sort

Use the hold space to preserve lines until data is needed.

sed -n '/^function h\(\)/,/^}/p' script.sh
2009-10-19 07:55:35
User: haivu
Functions: sed
Tags: bash sed

I often need to extract a function from a bash script and this command will do it.

n=$RANDOM$RANDOM$RANDOM; let "n %= 10000000000"; echo $n
sed -e "$ ! s/$/,/"
2009-10-13 10:13:52
User: jgc
Functions: sed

In this simple example the command will add a comma to the end of every line except the last. I found this really useful when programatically constructing sql scripts. See sample output for example.

echo $RANDOM$RANDOM$RANDOM |cut -c3-12
(printf "PERMISSIONS LINKS OWNER GROUP SIZE MONTH DAY HH:MM PROG-NAME\n" \ ; ls -l | sed 1d) | column -t
head -c4 /dev/urandom | od -N4 -tu4 | sed -ne '1s/.* //p'
sed -i '19375 s/^/#/' file
2009-10-07 17:50:40
User: TuxOtaku
Functions: sed

This will comment out a line, specified by line number, in a given file.

sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'

I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server.

So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg.

Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time.

curl "http://www.house.gov/house/MemberWWW.shtml" 2>/dev/null | sed -e :a -e 's/<[^>]*>//g;/</N;//ba' | perl -nle 's/^\t\t(.*$)/ $1/ and print;'
2009-09-24 23:37:36
User: drewk
Functions: perl sed
Tags: perl sed curl

Uses curl to download page of membership of US Congress. Use sed to strip HTML then perl to print a line starting with two tabs (a line with a representative)

find . -name "*.txt" -exec sed -i "s/old/new/" {} \;
find . -name "*.txt" | xargs sed -i "s/old/new/"
sed 's/^/$ /' "$script" | xclip
2009-09-13 11:21:54
User: intuited
Functions: sed
Tags: sed xclip meta

Assuming that $script contains the filename of a script you'd like to post as part of a comment on this site, this will prefix each line with '$' and pipe it into the X selection. From there just put the cursor in the right place in the comments box and middle-click.

Should work pretty much anywhere with xclip installed. On debian-ish systems this is installed as part of the package "xclip".

curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | sed -n "s/<title>\(.*\)<\/title.*name>\(.*\)<\/name>.*/\2 - \1/p"
2009-09-07 21:56:40
User: postrational
Functions: awk sed tr

Checks the Gmail ATOM feed for your account, parses it and outputs a list of unread messages.

For some reason sed gets stuck on OS X, so here's a Perl version for the Mac:

curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*<name>(.*)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/'

If you want to see the name of the last person, who added a message to the conversation, change the greediness of the operators like this:

curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*?<name>(.*?)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/'
curl -Is slashdot.org | sed -ne '/^X-[FBL]/s/^X-//p'
svn log fileName | sed -ne "/^r\([0-9][0-9]*\).*/{;s//\1/;s/.*/svn cat fileName@& > fileName.r&/p;}" | sh -s
2009-09-04 17:23:45
User: arcege
Functions: sed sh
Tags: svn sed shell

Manages everything through one sed script instead of pipes of greps and awks. Quoting of shell variables is generally easier within a sed script.

du -a --max-depth=1 | sort -n | cut -d/ -f2 | sed '$d' | while read i; do if [ -f $i ]; then du -h "$i"; else echo "$(du -h --max-depth=0 "$i")/"; fi; done
2009-09-03 20:43:43
User: nickwe
Functions: cut du echo read sed sort

Based on the MrMerry one, just add some visuals to differentiate files and directories

find . -maxdepth 1 -type d|xargs du -a --max-depth=0|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '1d'|while read i;do echo "$(du -h --max-depth=0 "$i")/";done;find . -maxdepth 1 -type f|xargs du -a|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '$d'|while read i;do du -h "$i";done
2009-09-03 20:33:21
User: nickwe
Functions: cut du echo find read sed sort xargs

Based on the MrMerry one, just add some visuals and sort directory and files

grep -ir 'foo' * | awk -F '{print $1}' | xargs vim
grep -Hrli 'foo' * | xargs vim
2009-09-03 15:44:05
User: dere22
Functions: grep xargs
Tags: vim sed awk grep

The grep switches eliminate the need for awk and sed. Modifying vim with -p will show all files in separate tabs, -o in separate vim windows. Just wish it didn't hose my terminal once I exit vim!!

grep -ir 'foo' * | awk '{print $1}' | sed -e 's/://' | xargs vim
2009-09-03 15:12:27
User: elubow
Functions: awk grep sed xargs
Tags: vim sed awk grep

This will drop you into vim to edit all files that contain your grep string.

curl -s http://tinyurl.com/create.php?url=http://<website.url>/ | sed -n 's/.*\(http:\/\/tinyurl.com\/[a-z0-9][a-z0-9]*\).*/\1/p' | uniq
perl -i'.bak' -pe 's/old/new/g' <filename>
for file in <filename>; do cp $file{,.bak} && sed 's/old/new/g' $file.bak > $file; done
2009-08-25 16:19:45
User: Cenobite
Functions: cp file sed
Tags: bash sed

"&&" runs sed if and only if the backup completed and /bin/cp exited cleanly. Works for multiple files; just specify multiple filenames (or glob). Use -v switch for cp to play it safe.

sed 's/\([0-9]*\)\.\([0-9]*\)\.\([0-9]*\)\.\([0-9]*\).in-addr.arpa domain name pointer\(.*\)\./\4.\3.\2.\1\5/' \ lookups.txt
2009-08-22 09:37:20
User: hemanth
Functions: sed
Tags: sed

Reverse DNS lookups, from a file with list of IP's, here the file is called lookups.txt