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Commands tagged find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged find - 354 results
sudo find / \( -nouser -o -nogroup \)
2012-07-13 07:09:08
User: gwd
Functions: find sudo
1

suspicious/anomalous ownership may indicate system breach; should return no results

sudo find / -perm -2 ! -type l -ls
find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 du -h | sort -hr | head -10
find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 du -h | sort -hr | head
find . -type f -exec stat -f '%m %N' {} \; | sort -n
find /path/to/dir -type f -print0 | xargs -0 grep -l "foo"
find /SOME/PATH -type f -execdir rm -f {} \+
2012-06-15 05:32:31
User: kiiwii
Functions: find rm
Tags: find rm
0

rm /SOME/PATH/*, when you hit "argument list too long".

find ./ -type f -exec sh -c 'echo "{}" "$(dirname "{}")/$(basename "{}" | tr "[A-Z]" "[a-z]")"' \;
2012-06-14 07:13:42
User: jelloir
Functions: find sh
Tags: bash find mv rename tr
0

Handles spaces in file names and directories. Optionally change directories as well by pipe to tr from dirname.

find . -type f -exec chmod a-x {} +
2012-06-11 12:50:56
User: sanmiguel
Functions: chmod find
Tags: find xargs chmod
4

Using `-exec cmd {} +` causes find to build the command using all matching filenames before execution, rather than once per file.

find . -type l -xtype l
2012-05-15 08:24:47
Functions: find
Tags: find symlinks
3

This is much safer than using -L, because it will not follow links that point to places outside the target directory subtree (CWD, in this case). See here for explanation: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/38691/9382

find . -name ._\* -exec rm -f {} \;
2012-05-14 22:25:42
User: silicontrip
Functions: find rm
Tags: find rm
0

This command won't delete resource forks from an HFS file system, only from file systems that don't natively support resource forks.

find . | xargs xattr -d com.apple.quarantine
2012-05-09 23:06:51
User: brockangelo
Functions: find xargs
-2

When downloading files on a Mac, Apple adds the x-attribute: com.apple.quarantine. Often, this makes it so you can't even run a ./configure. This command gets rid of the quarantine for all files in the current directory.

ls **/*.c(|pp)~(unit-test|android)/*
find . ! -regex '.*/\(unit-test\|android\)/.*' \( -name '*.c' -o -name '*.cpp' \)
2012-04-26 17:53:45
User: flatcap
Functions: find
Tags: find
0

Find files matching multiple descriptions (*.c and *.cpp) excluding multiple directories (unit-test and android).

find ./src -type d -name "Entity" | xargs ls -A | cut -d . -f1 | sed 's_^_app/console doctrine:generate:entities YourOwnBundleName:_'
2012-04-11 21:28:02
User: renoirb
Functions: cut find ls sed xargs
0

When I do a major change in my entities, I want to find a way to find all my Entities names and create the commande for me.

So instead of doing ls src/Your/OwnBundle... and then do it manually, this helps a lot.

find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 du -h | sort -hr | head -20
2012-03-30 10:21:12
User: flatcap
Functions: du find head sort xargs
7

Search for files and list the 20 largest.

find . -type f

gives us a list of file, recursively, starting from here (.)

-print0 | xargs -0 du -h

separate the names of files with NULL characters, so we're not confused by spaces

then xargs run the du command to find their size (in human-readable form -- 64M not 64123456)

| sort -hr

use sort to arrange the list in size order. sort -h knows that 1M is bigger than 9K

| head -20

finally only select the top twenty out of the list

find . -iname '*.zip' | while read file; do unzip -l "$file" | grep -q [internal file name] && echo $file; done
2012-03-23 18:08:35
User: ricardofunke
Functions: echo file find grep read
1

This command find which of your zip (or jar) files (when you have lots of them) contains a file you're searching for. It's useful when you have a lot of zip (or jar) files and need to know in which of them the file is archived.

It's most common with .jar files when you have to know which of the .jar files contains the java class you need.

To find in jar files, you must change "zip" to "jar" in the "find" command. The [internal file name] must be changed to the file name you're searching that is archived into one of the zip/jar files.

Before run this command you must step into the directory that contains the zip or jar files.

find /path/to/dir -iname "*.ext" -print0 | xargs -0 mplayer -really-quiet -cache 64 -vo dummy -ao dummy -identify 2>/dev/null | awk '/ID_LENGTH/{gsub(/ID_LENGTH=/,"")}{SUM += $1}END{ printf "%02d:%02d:%02d\n",SUM/3600,SUM%3600/60,SUM%60}'
2012-03-11 12:28:48
User: DarkSniper
Functions: awk find printf xargs
0

Improvement on Coderjoe's Solution. Gets rid of grep and cut (and implements them in awk) and specifies some different mplayer options that speed things up a bit.

find . -path ".*/cur/*" -type f ! -newermt "1 week ago" -delete
2012-03-05 15:48:21
User: evolix
Functions: find
0

This can be used to delete or archive old mails. In fact, for archiving its a bit different, you need to archive mails with any tools (e.g archivemail), and then deleting (if you want!).

Here we use -path ".*/cur/*" to avoid files limit in bash globbing and to search in any inbox (e.g .mymail .spam .whatever).

! -newermt "1 week ago" can be read: All files which is older than "1 week ago", adapt it in consequence.

find / -lname path/to/foo.txt
find -L / -samefile path/to/foo.txt
ls -ltr --directory $(find . -regex "./.*[^/]*\'" -type f | xargs -n 1 dirname | sort | uniq)
2012-03-02 03:48:47
User: pdkl95
Functions: dirname find ls sort xargs
0

This let me find some a set of modifications that were made to a rather large tree of files, where the file-names themselves were not unique (actually: insanely redundant and useless. "1.dat 2.dat ..."). Pruning down to last-branch brough things back to the "project-name" scope, and it's then easy to see which branches of the tree have recently changed, or any other similar search.

Ideally, it should sort the directories by the mtime of the most recent *file* *inside* the directory, but that's probably outside the scope of a (sane...) command line.

find . -depth -name '* *' -execdir bash \-c 'a="{}";mv -f "$a" ${a// /_}' \;
2012-02-28 04:03:40
User: DewiMorgan
Functions: bash find mv
0

Sometimes, you don't want to just replace the spaces in the current folder, but through the whole folder tree - such as your whole music collection, perhaps. Or maybe you want to do some other renaming operation throughout a tree - this command's useful for that, too.

To rename stuff through a whole directory tree, you might expect this to work:

for a in `find . -name '* *'`;do mv -i "$a" ${a// /_};done

No such luck. The "for" command will split its parameters on spaces unless the spaces are escaped, so given a file "foo bar", the above would not try to move the file "foo bar" to "foo_bar" but rather the file "foo" to "foo", and the file "bar" to "bar". Instead, find's -execdir and -depth arguments need to be used, to set a variable to the filename, and rename files within the directory before we rename the directory.

It has to be -execdir and won't work with just -exec - that would try to rename "foo bar/baz quux" to "foo_bar/baz_quux" in one step, rather than going into "foo bar/", changing "baz quux" to "baz_quux", then stepping out and changing "foo bar/" into "foo_bar/".

To rename just files, or just directories, you can put "-type f" or "-type d" after the "-depth" param.

You could probably safely replace the "mv" part of the line with a "rename" command, like rename 'y/ /_/' *, but I haven't tried, since that's way less portable.

perl -le 'print ~~ map {-s} <*>'
2012-02-21 21:09:48
User: MarxBro
Functions: perl
Tags: perl find wc
7

Just want to post a Perl alternative.

Does not count hidden files ('.' ones).

testt(){ o=abcdefghLkprsStuwxOGN;echo $@;for((i=0;i<${#o};i++));do c=${o:$i:1};test -$c $1 && help test | sed "/^ *-$c/!d;1q;s/^[^T]*/-$c /;s/ if/ -/";done; }
2012-02-21 16:54:53
User: AskApache
Functions: echo sed test
2

Applies each file operator using the built-in test.

testt /home/askapache/.sq

/home/askapache/.sq

-a True - file exists.

-d True - file is a directory.

-e True - file exists.

-r True - file is readable by you.

-s True - file exists and is not empty.

-w True - the file is writable by you.

-x True - the file is executable by you.

-O True - the file is effectively owned by you.

-G True - the file is effectively owned by your group.

-N True - the file has been modified since it was last read.

Full Function:

testt ()

{

local dp;

until [ -z "${1:-}" ]; do

dp="$1";

[[ ! -a "$1" ]] && dp="$PWD/$dp";

command ls -w $((${COLUMNS:-80}-20)) -lA --color=tty -d "$dp";

[[ -d "$dp" ]] && find "$dp" -mount -depth -wholename "$dp" -printf '%.5m %10M %#15s %#9u %-9g %#5U %-5G %Am/%Ad/%AY %Cm/%Cd/%CY %Tm/%Td/%TY [%Y] %p\n' -a -quit 2> /dev/null;

for f in a b c d e f g h L k p r s S t u w x O G N;

do

test -$f "$dp" && help test | sed "/-$f F/!d" | sed -e 's#^[\t ]*-\([a-zA-Z]\{1\}\) F[A-Z]*[\t ]* True if#-\1 "'$dp'" #g';

done;

shift;

done

}