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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

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Commands tagged find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged find - 367 results
for i in $(find ~/.config/chromium/*/Extensions -name 'manifest.json'); do n=$(grep -hIr name $i| cut -f4 -d '"'| sort);u="https://chrome.google.com/extensions/detail/";ue=$(basename $(dirname $(dirname $i))); echo -e "$n:\n$u$ue\n" ; done
2010-05-18 15:16:36
User: new_user
Functions: cut find grep

Gives you a list for all installed chrome (chromium) extensions with URL to the page of the extension.

With this you can easy add a new Bookmark folder called "extensions" add every URL to that folder, so it will be synced and you can access the names from every computer you are logged in.


Only tested with chromium, for chrome you maybe have to change the find $PATH.

find . -type f -not -regex ".*\/.svn\/.*" -exec sed -i 's/oldstring/newstring/g' {} +
find /tmp -type f -atime +1 -delete
2010-05-11 17:08:49
User: mattoufoutu
Functions: find

Cleans all files in /tmp that have been accessed at least 2 days ago.

find . \( -iname '*.[ch]' -o -iname '*.php' -o -iname '*.pl' \) -exec wc -l {} + | sort -n
2010-05-03 00:16:02
User: hackerb9
Functions: find sort wc

The same as the other two alternatives, but now less forking! Instead of using '\;' to mark the end of an -exec command in GNU find, you can simply use '+' and it'll run the command only once with all the files as arguments.

This has two benefits over the xargs version: it's easier to read and spaces in the filesnames work automatically (no -print0). [Oh, and there's one less fork, if you care about such things. But, then again, one is equal to zero for sufficiently large values of zero.]

find . \( -iname '*.[ch]' -o -iname '*.php' -o -iname '*.pl' \) | xargs wc -l | sort -n
2010-04-30 12:21:28
User: rbossy
Functions: find sort wc xargs
Tags: find count

find -exec is evil since it launches a process for each file. You get the total as a bonus.

Also, without -n sort will sort by lexical order (that is 9 after 10).

find . \( -iname '*.[ch]' -o -iname '*.php' -o -iname '*.pl' \) -exec wc -l {} \; | sort
2010-04-28 07:18:21
User: rkulla
Functions: find wc
Tags: find count code

Gives you a nice quick summary of how many lines each of your files is comprised of. (In this example, we just check .c, .h, .php and .pl). Since we just use wc -l to count, you'll just get a very rough estimate of how many lines of actual code there are. Use a more sophisticated algorithm instead if you need to.

find ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/Cache -exec file {} \; | awk -F ': ' 'tolower($2)~/mpeg/{print $1}'
2010-04-19 06:59:55
User: sata
Functions: awk file find

Grab a list of MP3s (with full path) out of Firefox's cache

Ever gone to a site that has an MP3 embedded into a pesky flash player, but no download link? Well, this one-liner will yank the *full path* of those tunes straight out of FF's cache in a clean list.

Shorter and Intuitive version of the command submitted by (TuxOtaku)

vim -r 2>&1 | grep '\.sw.' -A 5 | grep 'still running' -B 5
2010-04-17 19:43:35
User: rkulla
Functions: grep vim

Catches .swp, .swo, .swn, etc.

If you have access to lsof, it'll give you more compressed output and show you the associated terminals (e.g., pts/5, which you could then use 'w' to figure out where it's originating from): lsof | grep '\.sw.$'

If you have swp files turned off, you can do something like: ps x | grep '[g,v]im', but it won't tell you about files open in buffers, via :e [file].

mplayer -playlist <(find $PWD -type f)
2010-04-17 00:20:08
User: rkulla
Functions: find

Press > or < to go to the next or previous track. Space to toggle play/pause, etc.

It creates a temp file descriptor. To see where the file descriptor gets created type: echo <(echo foo)

This works better than running find first, then piping to mplayer with xargs or something, because that won't let you use keyboard shortcuts.

printf "\n%25s%10sTOTAL\n" 'FILE TYPE' ' '; for ext in $(find . -iname \*.* | egrep -o '\.[^[:space:].]+$' | egrep -v '\.svn*' | sort -f | uniq -i); do count=$(find . -iname \*$ext | wc -l); printf "%25s%10s%d\n" $ext ' ' $count; done
2010-04-16 21:12:11
User: rkulla
Functions: egrep find printf sort uniq wc

I created this command to give me a quick overview of how many file types a directory, and all its subdirectories, contains. It works based off file extension, rather than file(1)'s magic output, because it ended up being more accurate and less confusing.

Files that don't have an ext (README) are generally not important for me to want to count, but you're free to customize this fit your needs.

find . -mtime +10 -delete
2010-04-12 15:05:17
User: rexington
Functions: find

This will find all files under the path "." which are older than 10 days, and delete them. If you wish to use the "rm" command instead, replace "-delete" with "-exec rm [options] {} \;"

find . -mtime +10
2010-04-12 14:50:08
User: rexington
Functions: find

This will find all files in the path "." which are older than 10*24hrs (10 days). This will find any type of file.

nmap -sP; arp -n | grep "192.168.1.[0-9]* *ether"
2010-04-12 14:36:15
User: gavinmc
Functions: arp grep

You send a unicast ICMP packet to each host. Many firewalls will drop that ICMP. However, in order to send the ICMP, you'll have first done an ARP request and the remote machine is unlikely to ignore that, so the computer will be in your ARP table.

vim $(find . ! -path \*.svn\* -type f -iname \*foo\*)
2010-04-11 23:32:41
User: rkulla
Functions: find vim
Tags: vim find

This command searches the current directory, and all of its subdirs, for files that have the string "foo" in their filename (foo.c, two-foo.txt, index-FOO-bar.php, etc), and opens them in Vim. It ignores any hidden .svn directories. Change -iname to -name if you want to do case-sensitive matches.

Files open in buffers by default, so to verify that the correct files were opened, type ":list". You can load all the files in tabs by doing ":tab ball" or use 'vim -p' on the command-line to load files straight to tabs.

If you get permission denied errors, do: vim $(find . ! -path \*.svn\* -type -f iname \*foo\* 2>/dev/null)

To narrow it down to a single file extension, such as .php files, use \*foo\*.php (or '*foo*.php'. Which ever you prefer)

evince "$(find -name 'NameOfPdf.pdf')"
2010-04-04 20:55:51
User: RBerenguel

This assumes there is only one result. Either tail your search for one result or add | head -n 1 before the closing bracket. You can also use locate instead of find, if you have locate installed and updated

find . -name 'pattern'| xargs du -hc
function wherepath () { for DIR in `echo $PATH | tr ":" "\n" | awk '!x[$0]++ {print $0}'`; do ls ${DIR}/$1 2>/dev/null; done }
2010-04-02 20:32:36
User: mscar
Functions: awk ls tr
Tags: find locate PATH

The wherepath function will search all the directories in your PATH and print a unique list of locations in the order they are first found in the PATH. (PATH often has redundant entries.) It will automatically use your 'ls' alias if you have one or you can hardcode your favorite 'ls' options in the function to get a long listing or color output for example.


'whereis' only searches certain fixed locations.

'which -a' searches all the directories in your path but prints duplicates.

'locate' is great but isn't installed everywhere (and it's often too verbose).

find . -type d -name '*[A-Z]*' -execdir bash -c '! test -f "$(echo "$0" | tr "[:upper:]" "[:lower:]")"' {} \; -execdir bash -c 'mv "$0" "$(echo "$0" | tr "[:upper:]" "[:lower:]")"' {} \;
find ${PATH//:/ } -iname "*admin*" -executable -type f
2010-03-29 10:20:07
User: sanmiguel
Functions: find
Tags: bash find unix

While it seems (to me at least) a little counter-intuitive to filter on name first, this requires less work for find, as it allows it to immediately discount any files that do not match the name directly from the directory listing on disk. Querying against file attributes requires reading the file attributes, which is performed for all files matching any name based predicates.

find * \( -name "*.[hc]pp" -or -name "*.py" -or -name "*.i" \) -print0 | xargs -0 wc -l | tail -n 1
2010-03-25 18:58:29
User: neologism
Functions: find tail wc xargs
Tags: find xargs wc

Finds all C++, Python, SWIG files in your present directory (uses "*" rather than "." to exclude invisibles) and counts how many lines are in them. Returns only the last line (the total).

find . -type f -name '*.mp3' -execdir mp3gain -a '{}' +
2010-03-21 22:23:44
Functions: find

This normalizes volume in your mp3 library, but uses mp3gain's "album" mode. This applies a gain change to all files from each directory (which are presumed to be from the same album) - so their volume relative to one another is changed, while the average album volume is normalized. This is done because if one track from an album is quieter or louder than the others, it was probably meant to be that way.

echo $(( `ulimit -u` - `find /proc -maxdepth 1 \( -user $USER -o -group $GROUPNAME \) -type d|wc -l` ))
2010-03-12 08:42:49
User: AskApache
Functions: echo wc

There is a limit to how many processes you can run at the same time for each user, especially with web hosts. If the maximum # of processes for your user is 200, then the following sets OPTIMUM_P to 100.

OPTIMUM_P=$(( (`ulimit -u` - `find /proc -maxdepth 1 \( -user $USER -o -group $GROUPNAME \) -type d|wc -l`) / 2 ))

This is very useful in scripts because this is such a fast low-resource-intensive (compared to ps, who, lsof, etc) way to determine how many processes are currently running for whichever user. The number of currently running processes is subtracted from the high limit setup for the account (see limits.conf, pam, initscript).

An easy to understand example- this searches the current directory for shell scripts, and runs up to 100 'file' commands at the same time, greatly speeding up the command.

find . -type f | xargs -P $OPTIMUM_P -iFNAME file FNAME | sed -n '/shell script text/p'

I am using it in my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html especially for the xargs command. Xargs has a -P option that lets you specify how many processes to run at the same time. For instance if you have 1000 urls in a text file and wanted to download all of them fast with curl, you could download 100 at a time (check ps output on a separate [pt]ty for proof) like this:

cat url-list.txt | xargs -I '{}' -P $OPTIMUM_P curl -O '{}'

I like to do things as fast as possible on my servers. I have several types of servers and hosting environments, some with very restrictive jail shells with 20processes limit, some with 200, some with 8000, so for the jailed shells my xargs -P10 would kill my shell or dump core. Using the above I can set the -P value dynamically, so xargs always works, like this.

cat url-list.txt | xargs -I '{}' -P $OPTIMUM_P curl -O '{}'

If you were building a process-killer (very common for cheap hosting) this would also be handy.

Note that if you are only allowed 20 or so processes, you should just use -P1 with xargs.

find . -name '*.[c|h]pp' -o -name '*.[ch]' -type f
2010-03-11 01:22:06
User: lucasrangit
Functions: find

Find C/C++ source files and headers in the current directory.

alias busy='my_file=$(find /usr/include -type f | sort -R | head -n 1); my_len=$(wc -l $my_file | awk "{print $1}"); let "r = $RANDOM % $my_len" 2>/dev/null; vim +$r $my_file'
2010-03-09 21:48:41
User: busybee
Functions: alias awk find head sort vim wc

This makes an alias for a command named 'busy'. The 'busy' command opens a random file in /usr/include to a random line with vim. Drop this in your .bash_aliases and make sure that file is initialized in your .bashrc.

find -type f -exec mv {} . \;
2010-03-02 07:09:45
User: and3k
Functions: find mv

Find every file and move it to current directory.