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Commands tagged find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged find - 350 results
for f in `find ./ -name "*.zip"` ; do p=`pwd`; d=`dirname $f`; cd $d; b=`basename $f`; unzip $b; cd $p; done
2009-05-30 03:42:53
User: packetloss
Functions: cd
Tags: find unzip
-3

unzips all zip files in any subdirectory under the current directory. The zip files are unzipped in their respective subdirs

sort -n <( for i in $(find . -maxdepth 1 -mindepth 1 -type d); do echo $(find $i | wc -l) ": $i"; done;)
find . -uid 0 -print0 | xargs -0 chown foo:foo
2009-05-27 19:52:13
User: abcde
Functions: chown find xargs
1

In the example, uid 0 is root. foo:foo are the user:group you want to make owner and group. '.' is the "current directory and below." -print0 and -0 indicate that filenames and directories "are terminated by a null character instead of by whitespace."

diff <(cd dir1 && find | sort) <(cd dir2 && find | sort)
2009-05-21 04:44:29
User: mbirk
Functions: cd diff find
Tags: bash diff find
30

This uses Bash's "process substitution" feature to compare (using diff) the output of two different process pipelines.

find . -not \( -name .svn -prune \)
2009-05-20 19:45:24
User: mbirk
Functions: find
Tags: svn find
5

The "find" command can be annoying when used inside of a Subversion (or CVS) working directory. Obviously, you can combine this with other predicates and commands to create a more elaborate pipeline:

find /var/svn -type f -not \( -name .svn -prune \) -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum

Note: You can use my "dont-go-there.sh" script to wrap the "find" command and do this automatically at http://forwardlateral.com/blog/2006/02/27/dont-go-there/

find /home/fizz -type f -printf '%TY-%Tm-%Td %TT %p\n' | sort
count() { find $@ -type f -exec cat {} + | wc -l; }
find . -type d -exec rmdir {} \;
2009-05-19 08:59:15
User: sharfah
Functions: find rmdir
Tags: find rm
1

Deletes empty directories and prints an error if directory is not empty.

find /var -mount -ls -xdev | /usr/bin/sort -nr +6 | more
find . -name "\.svn" -exec rm -rf {} ";"
find . -name "*.[ch]" -exec grep -i -H "search pharse" {} \;
2009-05-06 15:22:49
User: bunedoggle
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep
33

I have a bash alias for this command line and find it useful for searching C code for error messages.

The -H tells grep to print the filename. you can omit the -i to match the case exactly or keep the -i for case-insensitive matching.

This find command find all .c and .h files

while :; do xfconf-query -c xfce4-desktop -p /backdrop/screen0/monitor0/image-path -s "$(find <image-directory> -type f -iregex '.*\.\(bmp\|gif\|jpg\|png\)$' | sort -R | head -1)"; sleep 30m; done
2009-04-30 03:09:52
Functions: sleep
Tags: bash find xfce
2

Change your wallpaper every thirty minutes (or however long you like, I suppose) to a randomly selected image in a directory and subdirectories. Bear in mind this is not safe to use if anyone else has write access to your image directory.

find . -path ./mnt -prune -o -path ./lost+found -prune -o -path ./sys -prune -o -path ./proc -prune -o -print | cpio -pumd /destination && mkdir /destination/mnt/ && mkdir /destination/proc && mkdir /destination/sys
2009-04-28 22:14:45
User: nutria
Functions: cpio find mkdir
Tags: find cpio
1

Clone linux installation.

find . | cpio -pumdv /destination
2009-04-28 22:08:30
User: nutria
Functions: cpio find
Tags: find cpio
3

Copy every file from current directory to destination preserving modification time.

find -writable
2009-04-11 22:16:35
User: kFiddle
Functions: find
4

Have a grudge against someone on your network? Do a "find -writable" in their directory and see what you can vandalize! But seriously, this is really useful to check the files in your own home directory to make sure they can't inadvertently be changed by someone else's wayward script.

find . -name "*.py" -exec grep -n -H -E "^(import|from) math" {} \;
find ~/.thumbnails/ -type f -atime +30 -print0 | xargs -0 rm
2009-03-30 04:23:07
User: alperyilmaz
Functions: find xargs
1

By time thumbnail images in ~/thumbnails take up too much space, this command will help deleting old ones.

Find options explained:

-type f : find files only, not directories

-atime +30 : last accessed more than 30 days ago

mv `find .zip ./` .
2009-03-27 04:42:48
User: smcpherson
Functions: mv
Tags: find
-8

This is useful if you have a collection of files in folders (for example, a bunch of .zip files that are contained in folders) and you want to move them all to a common folder.

find . -name 'junkfiles-*' -print0 | xargs -0 rm
2009-03-26 15:38:42
User: kancer
Functions: find xargs
Tags: find xargs print rm
1

Can be used for other commands as well, replace rm with ls.

It is easy to make this shorter but if the filenames involved have spaces, you will need to do use find's "-print0" option in conjunction with xargs's "-0" option. Otherwise the shell that xargs uses to execute the "rm" command line will treat the space as a token separator, thereby treating the name as two (or more) names.

find . -type f -depth -3 -mtime -5
2009-03-25 19:54:06
User: totoro
Functions: find
-2

Ever wanted to find the most recently modified files, but couldn't remember exactly where they were in a project directory with many subdirectories? The "find" command, using a combination of "-mtime -N" and "-depth -D" can be used to find those files. If your directory structure isn't very deep, just omit the "-depth -D", but if your directory structure is very deep, then you can limit the depth of the traversal using "-depth -D", where "D" is the maximum number of directory levels to descend.

find -depth . | (while read FULLPATH; do BASENAME=`basename "${FULLPATH}"`; DIRNAME=`dirname "${FULLPATH}"`; mv "${DIRNAME}/${BASENAME}" "${DIRNAME}/${BASENAME// /_}"; done)
2009-03-24 21:04:32
User: mohan43u
Functions: find mv read
-9

Takes filenames and directory names and replace space to '_'.

find . -print | sed -e 's;[^/]*/;|____;g;s;____|; |;g'
2009-03-12 22:25:26
Functions: find sed
-1

NOT MINE! Taken from hackzine.com blog.

It creates a tree-style output of all the (sub)folders and (sub)files from the current folder and down(deeper)

Quoting some of hackzine's words

"Murphy Mac sent us a link to a handy find/sed command that simulates the DOS tree command that you might be missing on your Mac or Linux box. [..split...] Like most things I've seen sed do, it does quite a bit in a single line of code and is completely impossible to read. Sure it's just a couple of substitutions, but like a jack in the box, it remains a surprise every time I run it."

find . -iname \*.mp3 -print0 | xargs -0 mp3gain -krd 6 && vorbisgain -rfs .
2009-03-09 18:11:35
User: Viaken
Functions: find xargs
9

Run this in the directory you store your music in.

mp3gain and vorbisgain applies the ReplayGain normalization routine to mp3 and ogg files (respectively) in a reversible way.

ReplayGain uses psychoacoustic analysis to make all files sound about the same loudness, so you don't get knocked out of your chair by loud songs after cranking up the volume on quieter ones.

vifind() { vi `find . -name "$1"` }
SUM=0; for FILESIZE in `find /tmp -type f -iname \*pdf -exec du -b {} \; 2>/dev/null | cut -f1` ; do (( SUM += $FILESIZE )) ; done ; echo "sum=$SUM"
2009-03-05 17:16:52
User: alcik
Functions: cut du echo
Tags: find du
0

This example summarize size of all pdf files in /tmp directory and its subdirectories (in bytes).

Replace "/tmp" with directory path of your choice and "\*pdf" or even "-iname \*pdf" with your own pattern to match specific type of files. You can replace also parameter for du to count kilo or megabytes, but because of du rounding the sum will not be correct (especially with lot of small files and megabytes counting).

In some cases you could probably use sth like this:

du -cb `find /tmp -type f -iname \*pdf`|tail -n 1

But be aware that this second command CANNOT count files with spaces in their names and it will cheat you, if there are some files matching the pattern that you don't have rights to read. The first oneliner is resistant to such problems (it will not count sizes of files which you cant read but will give you correct sum of rest of them).