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Commands tagged find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged find - 367 results
find . -type d | sed -e "s/[^-][^\/]*\// |/g" -e "s/|\([^ ]\)/|-\1/"
2013-07-16 10:08:34
User: opexxx
Functions: find sed
Tags: sed find
-4

show directory three

find -printf "%C@ %p\n"|sort
2013-06-19 10:42:49
User: oivvio
Functions: find
Tags: sort find
5

This uses the ability of find (at least the one from GNU findutils that is shiped with most linux distros) to display change time as part of its output. No xargs needed.

find /usr/include/ -name '*.[c|h]pp' -o -name '*.[ch]' -print0 | xargs -0 cat | grep -v "^ *$" | grep -v "^ *//" | grep -v "^ */\*.*\*/" | wc -l
2013-06-17 08:37:37
Functions: cat find grep wc xargs
1

Count your source and header file's line numbers. This ignores blank lines, C++ style comments, single line C style comments.

This will not ignore blank lines with tabs or multiline C style comments.

find . -type f -name filename.exe -exec sed -i "s/oldstring/oldstring/g" {} +;
find . -type f -a \! -links 1
2013-05-06 20:44:08
User: malathion
Functions: find
Tags: find links
1

libpurple likes to hardlink files repeatedly. To ignore libpurple, use sed: | sed '/\.\/\.purple/d'

for ii in $(find /path/to/docroot -type f -name \*.php); do echo $ii; wc -lc $ii | awk '{ nr=$2/($1 + 1); printf("%d\n",nr); }'; done
2013-04-05 19:06:17
Functions: awk echo find wc
0

I have found that base64 encoded webshells and the like contain lots of data but hardly any newlines due to the formatting of their payloads. Checking the "width" will not catch everything, but then again, this is a fuzzy problem that relies on broad generalizations and heuristics that are never going to be perfect.

What I have done is set an arbitrary threshold (200 for example) and compare the values that are produced by this script, only displaying those above the threshold. One webshell I tested this on scored 5000+ so I know it works for at least one piece of malware.

find ./public_html/ -name \*.php -exec grep -HRnDskip "\(passthru\|shell_exec\|system\|phpinfo\|base64_decode\|chmod\|mkdir\|fopen\|fclose\|readfile\) *(" {} \;
2013-04-03 12:42:19
User: lpanebr
Functions: find grep
0

Searched strings:

passthru, shell_exec, system, phpinfo, base64_decode, chmod, mkdir, fopen, fclose, readfile

Since some of the strings may occur in normal text or legitimately you will need to adjust the command or the entire regex to suit your needs.

print -rl /**/*(.f:o+w:)
2013-04-03 02:53:00
User: khayyam
0

Example of using zsh glob qualifier ...

"." = files

"f:" = files with access rights matching:

o+w = other plus write

find /var/www/ -type f -print0 | xargs -0 chmod 644
find /var/www/ -type f -print0 | xargs -0 chmod 644
2013-03-28 11:10:30
User: FiloSottile
Functions: chmod find xargs
Tags: find xargs chmod
-1

xargs is a more elegant approach to executing a command on find results then -exec as -exec is meant as a filtering flag.

find -maxdepth 1 -type f -newermt "00:00" -printf "%f\n" | sort
2013-03-23 12:50:01
User: TetsuyO
Functions: find
Tags: sort find files
-2

Finds files modified today since 00:00, removes ugly dotslash characters in front of every filename, and sorts them.

*EDITED* with the advices coming from flatcap (thanks!)

find -type f | xargs ls -1tr
count=0;while IFS= read -r -d '' line; do echo "${line#* }"; ((++count==5)) && break; done < <(find . -type f -printf '%s %p\0' | sort -znr)
2013-03-19 17:19:26
User: sharfah
Functions: echo find read sort
Tags: sort find head,
-4

This command is more robust because it handles spaces, newlines and control characters in filenames. It uses printf, not ls, to determine file size.

find . -type f -exec ls -s {} \; | sort -n -r | head -5
find /some/path -type f -printf '%f\n' | grep -o '\..\+$' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
2013-03-18 14:42:29
User: skkzsh
Functions: find grep sort uniq
2

Get the longest match of file extension (Ex. For 'foo.tar.gz', you get '.tar.gz' instead of '.gz')

find /some/path -type f | gawk -F/ '{print $NF}' | gawk -F. '/\./{print $NF}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
2013-03-18 14:40:26
User: skkzsh
Functions: find gawk sort uniq
0

If you have GNU findutils, you can get only the file name with

find /some/path -type f -printf '%f\n'

instead of

find /some/path -type f | gawk -F/ '{print $NF}'
find . -type f -size +100M
alias LS='find -mount -maxdepth 1 -printf "%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G %TF_%TR %CF_%CR %AF_%AR %#15s [%Y] %p\n" 2>/dev/null'
2013-02-06 17:54:14
User: AskApache
Functions: alias
2

This alias is super-handy for me because it quickly shows the details of each file in the current directory. The output is nice because it is sortable, allowing you to expand this basic example to do something amazing like showing you a list of the newest files, the largest files, files with bad perms, etc..

A recursive alias would be:

alias LSR='find -mount -printf "%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G %TF_%TR %CF_%CR %AF_%AR %#15s [%Y] %p\n" 2>/dev/null'

From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

find . -type f -name "*.txt" | while read; do (($(cat $THISFILE | wc -l) < 10)) && rm -vf "$THISFILE"; done
for i in `pfiles pid|grep S_IFREG|awk '{print $5}'|awk -F":" '{print $2}'`; do find / -inum $i |xargs ls -lah; done
2013-01-24 13:57:19
User: giorger
Functions: awk find grep ls xargs
0

Executing pfiles will return a list of all descriptors utilized by the process

We are interested in the S_IFREG entries since they are pointing usually to files

In the line, there is the inode number of the file which we use in order to find the filename.

The only bad thing is that in order not to search from / you have to suspect where could possibly be the file.

Improvements more than welcome.

lsof was not available in my case

find-duplicates () { find "$@" -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\0" | sort -rnz | uniq -dz | xargs -0 -I{} -n1 find "$@" -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate; }
2013-01-23 23:20:26
User: mpeschke
Functions: find md5sum sort uniq xargs
0

This is a modified version of the OP, wrapped into a bash function.

This version handles newlines and other whitespace correctly, the original has problems with the thankfully rare case of newlines in the file names.

It also allows checking an arbitrary number of directories against each other, which is nice when the directories that you think might have duplicates don't have a convenient common ancestor directory.

Find files that have been changed by a Chef run today.
find . -name "*.pdf" -exec pdftk {} dump_data output \; | grep NumberOfPages | awk '{s+=$2} END {print s}'
find . -type l -exec test ! -e {} \; -delete
2012-12-26 06:27:13
User: seb1245
Functions: find test
Tags: find
2

This command is adapted from http://otomaton.wordpress.com/2012/12/26/find-broken-symbolic-links/

Solutions with

find -L

don't work when the link is a loop, an error message is printed.

replace old new -- `find -type f`
2012-12-13 20:22:17
User: brian
Tags: sed find
1

Search and replace recursively. :-) Shorter and simpler than the others. And allows more terms:

replace old new [old new ...] -- `find -type f`