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Commands tagged ls from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged ls - 105 results
ls -l /proc/*/fd/* | grep 'deleted'| grep "\/proc.*\file-name-part"
2012-09-13 09:54:16
User: totti
Functions: grep ls
0

Accidentally deleted some file while used by a program ? (Eg: a song)

Use this command to find the file handle and recover using

cp /proc/pid/fd/filehandle /new/recoverd-file.ext
alias ls='if [[ -f .hidden ]]; then while read l; do opts+=(--hide="$l"); done < .hidden; fi; ls --color=auto "${opts[@]}"'
2012-08-12 13:10:23
User: expelledboy
Functions: alias ls read
Tags: hidden ls alias
1

Sometimes I would like to see hidden files, prefix with a period, but some files or folders I never want to see (and really wish I could just remove all together).

find . -type f -exec ls -l --full-time {} + | sort -k 6,7
2012-08-03 22:22:51
User: quadcore
Functions: find ls sort
Tags: sort find ls
2

This sorts files in multiple directories by their modification date. Note that sorting is done at the end using "sort", instead of using the "-ltr" options to "ls". This ensures correct results when sorting a large number of files, in which case "find" will call "ls" multiple times.

ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e 's/:$//' -e 's/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g' -e 's/^/ /' -e 's/-/|/'
find . -printf "%s %p\n" | sort -n
find . -ls | sort -k 7 -n
tree -ifs --noreport .|sort -n -k2
2012-05-04 09:18:39
User: knoppix5
Functions: sort
1

or

tree -ifsF --noreport .|sort -n -k2|grep -v '/$'

(rows presenting directory names become hidden)

compgen -c | sort -u > commands && less commands
ls ${PATH//:/ }
2012-04-26 19:45:52
User: Zulu
Functions: ls
9

List all commands present on system by folder.

PATH contains all command folder separated by ':'. With ${PATH//:/ }, we change ':' in space and create a list of folder for ls command.
find . -type d |sed 's:[^-][^/]*/:--:g; s:^-: |:'
2012-04-14 00:51:09
User: khopesh
Functions: find sed
Tags: ls tree
0

shorter version. I believe find is faster than ls as well.

find /some/path -type f -and -printf "%f\n" | egrep -io '\.[^.]*$' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
2012-04-02 19:25:35
User: kyle0r
Functions: egrep find sort uniq
Tags: uniq ls grep
0

the

find -printf "%f\n" prints just the file name from the given path. This means directory paths which contain extensions will not be considered.
ls -Rl dir1/ > /tmp/dir1.ls; ls -Rl dir2/ > /tmp/dir2.ls; meld /tmp/dir1.ls /tmp/dir2.ls
2012-03-04 13:06:55
User: joeseggiola
Functions: ls
0

Compare the ls -Rl output of two directories in meld (you can also use diff -y instead of meld).

find ./ -type f -size +100000k -exec ls -lh {} \; 2>/dev/null| awk '{ print $8 " : " $5}'
2012-01-21 04:19:35
User: Goez
Functions: awk find ls
0

This command does a basic find with size. It also improves the printout given (more clearer then default)

Adjusting the ./ will alter the path.

Adjusting the "-size +100000k" will specify the size to search for.

ls -t | head
2012-01-17 16:28:32
User: scottlinux
Functions: ls
Tags: tail ls head,
2

This will quickly display files last changed in a directory, with the newest on top.

ls -d1 $PWD/*
ls -d1 $PWD/{.*,*}
ls -a | sed "s#^#${PWD}/#"
2011-12-16 22:19:06
User: bbbco
Functions: ls sed
Tags: sed ls pwd
-9

Use the -a flag to display all files, including hidden files. If you just want to display regular files, use a -1 (yes, that is the number one). Got this by RTFM and adding some sed magic.

[[email protected] ~]$ ls -a | sed "s#^#${PWD}/#"

/home/bbbco/.

/home/bbbco/..

/home/bbbco/2011-09-01-00-33-02.073-VirtualBox-2934.log

/home/bbbco/2011-09-10-09-49-57.004-VirtualBox-2716.log

/home/bbbco/.adobe

/home/bbbco/.bash_history

/home/bbbco/.bash_logout

/home/bbbco/.bash_profile

/home/bbbco/.bashrc

...

[[email protected] ~]$ ls -1 | sed "s#^#${PWD}/#"

/home/bbbco/2011-09-01-00-33-02.073-VirtualBox-2934.log

/home/bbbco/2011-09-10-09-49-57.004-VirtualBox-2716.log

/home/bbbco/cookies.txt

/home/bbbco/Desktop

/home/bbbco/Documents

/home/bbbco/Downloads

...

for file in * .*; do echo $PWD/$file; done
2011-12-16 13:42:07
User: marek158
Functions: echo file
Tags: echo ls
-8

Also lists hidden files, current dir and topdir.

for file in *; do echo $PWD/$file; done
ls -ad */
2011-12-10 17:08:07
User: tbekolay
Functions: ls
Tags: ls directory
3

Like normal ls, but only lists directories.

Can be used with -l to get more details (ls -lad */)

ls -l `whereis gcc`
2011-11-15 19:45:08
User: knathan54
Functions: ls
Tags: which ls zsh
0

whereis (1) - locate the binary, source, and manual page files for a command

Not actually better, just expanded a bit. The "whereis" command has the following output:

whereis gcc

gcc: /usr/bin/gcc /usr/lib/gcc /usr/bin/X11/gcc /usr/share/man/man1/gcc.1.gz

therefore the 'ls' error on first line, which could be eliminated with a little extra work.

ls -l =gcc
ls -l `which gcc`
fail () { ln -s /nonexistent 0_FAIL_${1}; }
2011-11-06 20:14:33
User: pipeliner
Functions: ln
Tags: ls color link fail
0

If you use colored ls(1), the broken symbolic links significantly differ from regular files and directories in the ls listing. In my case it is bright red. 0 is for getting the first place in the list.

ls -1 $PATH*/* | xargs file | awk -F":" '!($2~/PDF document/){print $1}' |xargs rm -rf