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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

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Psst. Open beta.

Wow, didn't really expect you to read this far down. The latest iteration of the site is in open beta. It's a gentle open beta-- not in prime-time just yet. It's being hosted over at UpGuard (link) and you are more than welcome to give it a shot. Couple things:

  • » The open beta is running a copy of the database that will not carry over to the final version. Don't post anything you don't mind losing.
  • » If you wish to use your user account, you will probably need to reset your password.
Your feedback is appreciated via the form on the beta page. Thanks! -Jon & CLFU Team

Commands tagged ls from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged ls - 105 results
ls -lFart |tail -n1
2011-10-17 19:49:14
User: jambino
Functions: ls tail
Tags: tail pipe ls

List all files in a directory in reverse order by modified timestamp. When piped through tail the user will see the most recent file name.

lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
2011-08-15 03:10:58
User: h3xx
Functions: find ls sort xargs

Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too.

On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login:

LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto'


alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS'

which works great.

ls -l | grep ^d | sed 's:.*\ ::g'
rm -R `ls | egrep -v 'dir1|dir2|file1'`
find * -type d -maxdepth 0
2011-08-07 06:04:50
User: edogawaconan
Functions: find
Tags: find ls grep sh


ls -F | grep /\$

but will break on directories containing newlines. Or the safe, POSIX sh way (but will miss dotfiles):

for i in *; do test -d "./$i" && printf "%s\n" "$i"; done
ls -1d */
ls -l | grep ^d | sed 's:.*\ ::g'
2011-08-06 23:52:46
User: LinuxMan
Functions: grep ls sed
Tags: bash sed ls grep

Normally, if you just want to see directories you'd use brianmuckian's command 'ls -d *\', but I ran into problems trying to use that command in my script because there are often multiple directories per line. If you need to script something with directories and want to guarantee that there is only one entry per line, this is the fastest way i know

ls -Fhitlar
2011-07-11 10:29:34
User: ringzero
Functions: ls
Tags: ls

Was playing with the shell. It struck to me, just by rearranging the parameters, i was able to remember what they did and in a cool way.

Enter the 'hitlar' mode.

bash-3.2$ ls -hitlar

Shows all items with inodes, in list view, human readable size, sorted by modification time in reverse,

bash-3.2$ ls -Fhitlar

Shows the same with classification info. Add the hitlar mode alias to your .bashrc.

bash-3.2$ echo "alias hitlar='ls -Fhitlar'" >> ~/.bashrc

bash-3.2$ hitlar

bash-3.2$ hitlar filename

ls -alt /directory/ | awk '{ print $6 " " $7 " -- " $9 }'
find . -type f | awk -F'.' '{print $NF}' | sort| uniq -c | sort -g
ls | grep -Eo "\..+" | sort -u
ls -Xp | grep -Eo "\.[^/]+$" | sort | uniq
2011-02-10 20:47:59
User: Amarok
Functions: grep ls sort
Tags: uniq ls grep

Works on current directory, with built-in sorting.

ls | grep '^[A-Z0-9]*$'
2010-12-19 21:45:53
User: b_t
Functions: grep ls

Some source package have many 'README' kind of files, among many other regular files/directories. This command could be useful when one wants to list only 'README' kind of files among jungle of other files. (e.g. I came across this situation after downloading source for module-init-tools)

Warning: This command would miss a file like => README.1 (or one with spaces in-between)

Corrections welcome.

xdg-open .
2010-10-05 04:20:31
User: schlaegel

Opens the current working directory in the user's preferred application using freedesktop.org's xdg-open.

gnome-open .
2010-10-01 13:16:00
User: pahnin

when working under a cli sometime you need to list the files with ls

but u can open gnome file browser with the command 'gnome-open .' under current directory

ls -l $HOME
ls -l ~
watch 'ls -tough --full-time *.vmdk'
2010-08-20 17:28:28
User: vRobM
Functions: watch

To monitor .vmdk files during snapshot deletion (commit) on ESX only (ESXi doesn't have the watch command):

1. Navigate to the VM directory containing .vmdk files.

# watch "ls -tough --full-time *.vmdk"


-t sorts by modification time

-o do not list group information (to narrow the output)

-u sorts by access time

-g only here for the purpose to easily remember the created mnemonic word 'tough'

-h prints sizes in human readable format (e.g., 1K 234M 2G)

--full-time sets the time style to full-iso and does not list user information (to narrow the output)

optionally useful parameters to the watch command:

-d highlight changes between updates

-n seconds to wait between updates (default is 2)

-t turn off printing the header

man $(ls /bin | sed -n $((RANDOM % $(ls /bin | wc -l) + 1))p)
2010-08-20 17:15:33
User: putnamhill
Functions: ls man sed wc
Tags: man sed ls wc random

Great idea camocrazed. Another twist would be to display a different man page based on the day of the year. The following will continuously cycle through all man pages:

man $(ls /bin | sed -n $(($(date +%j) % $(ls /bin | wc -l)))p)
ls --quoting-style={escape,shell,c}
ls | sed 's/.*/"&"/'
2010-08-17 15:38:51
User: putnamhill
Functions: ls sed
Tags: sed ls

Looks like you're stuck with sed if your ls doesn't have a -Q option.

ls -Xp /path/to/dir | grep -Eo "\.[^/]+$" | uniq
2010-08-12 16:32:54
User: karpoke
Functions: grep ls
Tags: uniq ls grep

If we want files with more than one extension, like .tar.gz, only appear the latest, .gz:

ls -Xp /path/to/dir | grep -Eo "\.[^./]+$" | uniq
ls -l `which foo`
2010-07-09 01:34:02
User: adeverteuil
Functions: ls

You may also use the $(which foo) variant instead of backticks. I personnaly have an alias ll='ls -l'.

find / -type f -name *.tar.gz -size +10M -exec ls -l {} \;
2010-06-29 12:39:02
User: 0disse0
Functions: find ls
Tags: find ls exec rm type

Please be careful while executing the following command as you don?t want

to delete the files by mistake. The best practice is to execute the same

command with ls ?l to make sure you know which files will get deleted when

you execute the command with rm.

statt(){ C=c;stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'|while read l;do p=${l/% */};[ $p == %Z ]&&C=fc&&echo ^FS:^;echo "`stat -$C $p \"$1\"` ^$p^${l#%* }";done|column -ts^; }
2010-06-11 23:31:03
User: AskApache
Functions: column read sed

This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option.

If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations.

alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'"

To display on 2 lines:

( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'<<<`stat --h|sed -n '/^ *%/s/^ *%\(.\).*$/\1:%\1/p'`); do G=$(echo "stat -$N '$L' \"$F\""); eval $G; N=fc;done; )

For a similarly powerful stat-like function optimized for pretty output (and can sort by any field), check out the "lll" function


From my .bash_profile ->