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Commands tagged grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged grep - 343 results
psgrep() { if [ ! -z $1 ] ; then echo "Grepping for processes matching $1..." ps aux | grep -i $1 | grep -v grep else echo "!! Need name to grep for" fi }
2010-02-27 13:47:28
User: evenme
Functions: echo grep ps
Tags: grep ps
-4

Grep for a named process.

SITE="www.google.com"; curl --silent "http://www.shadyurl.com/create.php?myUrl=$SITE&shorten=on" | awk -F\' '/is now/{print $6}'
sed -i 's/oldname@example.com/newname@example.com/g' `grep oldname@example.com -rl .`
2010-02-18 18:26:09
User: and3k
Functions: sed
0

Do a recursive (-r) search with grep for all files where your old mail address is mentioned (-l shows only the file names) and use sed to replace it with your new address. Works with other search/replacement patterns too.

pdftotext [file] - | grep 'YourPattern'
2010-02-14 21:42:35
User: drewk
Functions: grep
Tags: pipe grep pdf
27

PDF files are simultaneously wonderful and heinous. They are wonderful in being ubiquitous and mostly being cross platform. They are heinous in being very difficult to work with from the command line, search, grep, use only the text inside the PDF, or use outside of proprietary products.

xpdf is a wonderful set of PDF tools. It is on many linux distros and can be installed on OS X. While primarily an open PDF viewer for X, xpdf has the tool "pdftotext" that can extract formated or unformatted text from inside a PDF that has text. This text stream can then be further processed by grep or other tool. The '-' after the file name directs output to stdout rather than to a text file the same name as the PDF.

Make sure you use version 3.02 of pdftotext or later; earlier versions clipped lines.

The lines extracted from a PDF without the "-layout" option are very long. More paragraphs. Use just to test that a pattern exists in the file. With "-layout" the output resembles the lines, but it is not perfect.

xpdf is available open source at http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

find -type f -regex ".*\.\(js\|php\|inc\|htm[l]?\|css\)$" -exec grep -il 'searchstring' '{}' +
find . -type f \( -name "*.js" -o -name "*.php" -o -name "*.inc" -o -name "*.html" -o -name "*.htm" -o -name "*.css" \) -exec grep -il 'searchString' {} \;
2010-02-07 15:28:20
User: niels_bom
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep search
-1

Use find to recursively make a list of all files from the current directory and downwards. The files have to have an extension of the ones listed. Then for every file found, grep it for 'searchString', returns the filename if searchString is found.

find . -type f | parallel -j+0 grep -i foobar
2010-01-30 02:08:46
Functions: find grep
3

Parallel does not suffer from the risk of mixing of output that xargs suffers from. -j+0 will run as many jobs in parallel as you have cores.

With parallel you only need -0 (and -print0) if your filenames contain a '\n'.

Parallel is from https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/parallel/

find directory/ -exec grep -ni phrase {} +
2010-01-28 12:15:24
User: sanmiguel
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep
0

The difference between this and the other alternatives here using only grep is that find will, by default, not follow a symlink. In some cases, this is definitely desirable.

Using find also allows you to exclude certain files, eg

find directory/ ! -name "*.tmp" -exec grep -ni phrase {} +

would allow you to exclude any files .tmp files.

Also note that there's no need for calling grep recursively, as find passes each found file to grep.

svn add $(svn st|grep ^\?|cut -c2-)
2010-01-28 09:48:46
User: inkel
Functions: cut grep
Tags: bash svn grep cut
0

This version makes uses of Bash shell expansion, so it might not work in all other shells.

grep -E '^(cn|mail):' file.ldif | sed -e 's/^[a-z]*: //'
renice +5 -p $(pidof <process name>)
grep -rHi searchphrase *.php
grepp() { [ $# -eq 1 ] && perl -00ne "print if /$1/i" || perl -00ne "print if /$1/i" < "$2";}
2010-01-12 04:30:15
User: eightmillion
Functions: perl
13

This is a command that I find myself using all the time. It works like regular grep, but returns the paragraph containing the search pattern instead of just the line. It operates on files or standard input.

grepp <PATTERN> <FILE>

or

<SOMECOMMAND> | grepp <PATTERN>
$class=ExampleClass; $path=src; for constant in `grep ' const ' $class.php | awk '{print $2;}'`; do grep -r "$class::$constant" $path; done
php -i | grep php.ini
2009-12-23 15:52:20
User: jemmille
Functions: grep
Tags: bash grep PHP
5

Quick and easy way to find out which php.ini file is being used. Especially useful if you just need to find the location of the file for editing purposes.

sed -e 's/{"url":/\n&/g' ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js | cut -d\" -f4
grep -oP '"url":"\K[^"]+' $(ls -t ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js | sed q)
2009-12-09 20:34:32
User: sputnick
Functions: grep ls sed
0

Require "grep -P" ( pcre ).

If you don't have grep -P, use that :

grep -Eo '"url":"[^"]+' $(ls -t ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js | sed q) | cut -d'"' -f4
MyIps(){ echo -e "local:\n$(ifconfig $1 | grep -oP 'inet (add?r:)?\K(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}')\n\npublic:\n$(curl -s sputnick-area.net/ip)"; }
2009-12-06 22:52:31
User: sputnick
Functions: echo
1

Like the tiltle said, you can use an argument too ( the interface )

MyIps eth0

will show only the IP of this interface and the public IP

( tested with Linux )

You can add that function in ~/.bashrc, then

. ~/.bashrc

Now you are ready to call this function in all your terms...

printf "%s\n" !(pattern) ## ksh, or bash with shopt -s extglob
2009-11-26 14:09:56
User: cfajohnson
Functions: bash printf
Tags: ls grep
-1

There's no need for ls or grep; printf is builtin to most modern shells

ls *[^p][^a][^t]* ; # or shopt -s extglob; ls !(*pattern*)
ls | grep -vi pattern
cat /var/log/httpd/access_log | grep q= | awk '{print $11}' | awk -F 'q=' '{print $2}' | sed 's/+/ /g;s/%22/"/g;s/q=//' | cut -d "&" -f 1 | mail youremail@isp.com -s "[your-site] search strings for `date`"
2009-11-22 03:03:06
User: isma
Functions: awk cat grep sed strings
-2

It's not a big line, and it *may not* work for everybody, I guess it depends on the detail of access_log configuration in your httpd.conf. I use it as a prerotate command for logrotate in httpd section so it executes before access_log rotation, everyday at midnight.

grep -c '^From ' mbox_file
grep "model name" /proc/cpuinfo
2009-11-05 05:23:30
User: getkaizer
Functions: grep
Tags: grep cpuinfo
3

Extracts the model name of the CPU and displays it on screen.

ifconfig eth1 | grep inet\ addr | awk '{print $2}' | cut -d: -f2 | sed s/^/eth1:\ /g
2009-11-03 19:26:40
User: TuxOtaku
Functions: awk cut grep ifconfig sed
2

Sometimes, you don't really care about all the other information that ifconfig spits at you (however useful it may otherwise be). You just want an IP. This strips out all the crap and gives you exactly what you want.