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Commands tagged grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged grep - 336 results
find directory/ -exec grep -ni phrase {} +
2010-01-28 12:15:24
User: sanmiguel
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep
0

The difference between this and the other alternatives here using only grep is that find will, by default, not follow a symlink. In some cases, this is definitely desirable.

Using find also allows you to exclude certain files, eg

find directory/ ! -name "*.tmp" -exec grep -ni phrase {} +

would allow you to exclude any files .tmp files.

Also note that there's no need for calling grep recursively, as find passes each found file to grep.

svn add $(svn st|grep ^\?|cut -c2-)
2010-01-28 09:48:46
User: inkel
Functions: cut grep
Tags: bash svn grep cut
0

This version makes uses of Bash shell expansion, so it might not work in all other shells.

grep -E '^(cn|mail):' file.ldif | sed -e 's/^[a-z]*: //'
renice +5 -p $(pidof <process name>)
grep -rHi searchphrase *.php
grepp() { [ $# -eq 1 ] && perl -00ne "print if /$1/i" || perl -00ne "print if /$1/i" < "$2";}
2010-01-12 04:30:15
User: eightmillion
Functions: perl
13

This is a command that I find myself using all the time. It works like regular grep, but returns the paragraph containing the search pattern instead of just the line. It operates on files or standard input.

grepp <PATTERN> <FILE>

or

<SOMECOMMAND> | grepp <PATTERN>
$class=ExampleClass; $path=src; for constant in `grep ' const ' $class.php | awk '{print $2;}'`; do grep -r "$class::$constant" $path; done
php -i | grep php.ini
2009-12-23 15:52:20
User: jemmille
Functions: grep
Tags: bash grep PHP
5

Quick and easy way to find out which php.ini file is being used. Especially useful if you just need to find the location of the file for editing purposes.

sed -e 's/{"url":/\n&/g' ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js | cut -d\" -f4
grep -oP '"url":"\K[^"]+' $(ls -t ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js | sed q)
2009-12-09 20:34:32
User: sputnick
Functions: grep ls sed
0

Require "grep -P" ( pcre ).

If you don't have grep -P, use that :

grep -Eo '"url":"[^"]+' $(ls -t ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js | sed q) | cut -d'"' -f4
MyIps(){ echo -e "local:\n$(ifconfig $1 | grep -oP 'inet (add?r:)?\K(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}')\n\npublic:\n$(curl -s sputnick-area.net/ip)"; }
2009-12-06 22:52:31
User: sputnick
Functions: echo
1

Like the tiltle said, you can use an argument too ( the interface )

MyIps eth0

will show only the IP of this interface and the public IP

( tested with Linux )

You can add that function in ~/.bashrc, then

. ~/.bashrc

Now you are ready to call this function in all your terms...

printf "%s\n" !(pattern) ## ksh, or bash with shopt -s extglob
2009-11-26 14:09:56
User: cfajohnson
Functions: bash printf
Tags: ls grep
-1

There's no need for ls or grep; printf is builtin to most modern shells

ls *[^p][^a][^t]* ; # or shopt -s extglob; ls !(*pattern*)
ls | grep -vi pattern
cat /var/log/httpd/access_log | grep q= | awk '{print $11}' | awk -F 'q=' '{print $2}' | sed 's/+/ /g;s/%22/"/g;s/q=//' | cut -d "&" -f 1 | mail youremail@isp.com -s "[your-site] search strings for `date`"
2009-11-22 03:03:06
User: isma
Functions: awk cat grep sed strings
-2

It's not a big line, and it *may not* work for everybody, I guess it depends on the detail of access_log configuration in your httpd.conf. I use it as a prerotate command for logrotate in httpd section so it executes before access_log rotation, everyday at midnight.

grep -c '^From ' mbox_file
grep "model name" /proc/cpuinfo
2009-11-05 05:23:30
User: getkaizer
Functions: grep
Tags: grep cpuinfo
3

Extracts the model name of the CPU and displays it on screen.

ifconfig eth1 | grep inet\ addr | awk '{print $2}' | cut -d: -f2 | sed s/^/eth1:\ /g
2009-11-03 19:26:40
User: TuxOtaku
Functions: awk cut grep ifconfig sed
2

Sometimes, you don't really care about all the other information that ifconfig spits at you (however useful it may otherwise be). You just want an IP. This strips out all the crap and gives you exactly what you want.

set | fgrep " ()"
2009-10-22 17:48:54
User: haivu
Functions: fgrep set
0

If you issue the "set" command, you'll see a list of variables and functions. This command displays just those functions' names.

argv=("$@"); rest=${argv[@]:1}; less -JMN +"/$1" `grep -l $1 $rest`
2009-10-16 17:36:16
User: lassel
Functions: less
Tags: bash less log grep
1

Really useful way to combine less and grep while browsing log files.

I can't figure out how to make it into a true oneliner so paste it into a script file called lgrep:

Usage:

lgrep searchfor file1 [file2 file3]

Advanced example (grep for an Exception in logfiles that starts with qc):

lgrep Exception $(find . -name "qc*.log")

h() { if [ -z "$1" ]; then history; else history | grep "$@"; fi; }
2009-10-13 21:49:37
User: haivu
Functions: grep
Tags: bash grep
6

Place this in your .bash_profile and you can use it two different ways. If you issue 'h' on its own, then it acts like the history command. If you issue:

h cd

Then it will display all the history with the word 'cd'

sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'
9

I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server.

So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg.

Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time.

ack --pager='less -r'
grep -RnisI <pattern> *
2009-09-22 15:09:43
User: birnam
Functions: grep
Tags: bash grep
33

This is how I typically grep. -R recurse into subdirectories, -n show line numbers of matches, -i ignore case, -s suppress "doesn't exist" and "can't read" messages, -I ignore binary files (technically, process them as having no matches, important for showing inverted results with -v)

I have grep aliased to "grep --color=auto" as well, but that's a matter of formatting not function.

xev -id `xwininfo | grep 'Window id' | awk '{print $4}'`
2009-09-19 22:47:16
User: ktoso
Functions: awk grep
2

After executing this, click on a window you want to track X Window events in.

Explaination: "xev will track events in the window with the following -id, which we get by greping window information obtained by xwininfo"