Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

2011-03-12 - Confoo 2011 presentation
Slides are available from the commandlinefu presentation at Confoo 2011: http://presentations.codeinthehole.com/confoo2011/
2011-01-04 - Moderation now required for new commands
To try and put and end to the spamming, new commands require moderation before they will appear on the site.
2010-12-27 - Apologies for not banning the trolls sooner
Have been away from the interwebs over Christmas. Will be more vigilant henceforth.
2010-09-24 - OAuth and pagination problems fixed
Apologies for the delay in getting Twitter's OAuth supported. Annoying pagination gremlin also fixed.
Hide

Tags

Hide

Functions

Commands tagged grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged grep - 343 results
set | fgrep " ()"
2009-10-22 17:48:54
User: haivu
Functions: fgrep set
1

If you issue the "set" command, you'll see a list of variables and functions. This command displays just those functions' names.

argv=("$@"); rest=${argv[@]:1}; less -JMN +"/$1" `grep -l $1 $rest`
2009-10-16 17:36:16
User: lassel
Functions: less
Tags: bash less log grep
1

Really useful way to combine less and grep while browsing log files.

I can't figure out how to make it into a true oneliner so paste it into a script file called lgrep:

Usage:

lgrep searchfor file1 [file2 file3]

Advanced example (grep for an Exception in logfiles that starts with qc):

lgrep Exception $(find . -name "qc*.log")

h() { if [ -z "$1" ]; then history; else history | grep "$@"; fi; }
2009-10-13 21:49:37
User: haivu
Functions: grep
Tags: bash grep
6

Place this in your .bash_profile and you can use it two different ways. If you issue 'h' on its own, then it acts like the history command. If you issue:

h cd

Then it will display all the history with the word 'cd'

sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'
9

I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server.

So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg.

Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time.

ack --pager='less -r'
grep -RnisI <pattern> *
2009-09-22 15:09:43
User: birnam
Functions: grep
Tags: bash grep
36

This is how I typically grep. -R recurse into subdirectories, -n show line numbers of matches, -i ignore case, -s suppress "doesn't exist" and "can't read" messages, -I ignore binary files (technically, process them as having no matches, important for showing inverted results with -v)

I have grep aliased to "grep --color=auto" as well, but that's a matter of formatting not function.

xev -id `xwininfo | grep 'Window id' | awk '{print $4}'`
2009-09-19 22:47:16
User: ktoso
Functions: awk grep
2

After executing this, click on a window you want to track X Window events in.

Explaination: "xev will track events in the window with the following -id, which we get by greping window information obtained by xwininfo"

ss -p
2009-09-19 21:55:01
User: Escher
46

for one line per process:

ss -p | cat

for established sockets only:

ss -p | grep STA

for just process names:

ss -p | cut -f2 -sd\"

or

ss -p | grep STA | cut -f2 -d\"
lsof -P -i -n | cut -f 1 -d " "| uniq | tail -n +2
netstat -lantp | grep -i stab | awk -F/ '{print $2}' | sort | uniq
2009-09-19 14:54:31
User: ProMole
Functions: awk grep netstat sort
7

Show apps that use internet connection at the moment.

Can be used to discover what programms create internet traffic. Skip the part after awk to get more details, though it will not work showing only unique processes.

This version will work with other languages such as Spanish and Portuguese, if the word for "ESTABLISHED" still contain the fragment "STAB"(e.g. "ESTABELECIDO")

netstat -lantp | grep -i establ | awk -F/ '{print $2}' | sort | uniq
netstat -lantp | grep -i establ | awk -F/ '{print $2}' | uniq | sort
2009-09-19 13:54:36
User: ktoso
Functions: awk grep netstat uniq
-1

Can be used to discover what programms create internet traffic. Skip the part after awk to get more details.

Has anyone an idea why the uniq doesn't work propperly here (see sample output)?

echo 127.0.0.1 | egrep -e '^(([01]?[0-9]{1,2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-4])\.){3}([01]?[0-9]{1,2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-4])$'
2009-09-17 17:40:48
User: arcege
Functions: echo egrep
-1

Handles everything except octets with 255. Ran through ip generator with variable octet lengths.

echo 254.003.032.3 | grep -P '^((25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|[01]?[\d]?[1-9])\.){3}(25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|[01]?[\d]?[1-9])$'
2009-09-17 12:59:44
User: foob4r
Functions: echo grep
0

This obey that you don't match any broadcast or network addresses and stay between 1.1.1.1 - 254.254.254.254

echo "123.32.12.134" | grep -P '([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])'
ack -ai 'searchterm'
find . -type f -exec grep -qi 'foo' {} \; -print0 | xargs -0 vim
2009-09-03 17:55:26
User: arcege
Functions: find grep xargs
Tags: vim find grep
-1

Make sure that find does not touch anything other than regular files, and handles non-standard characters in filenames while passing to xargs.

find . -exec grep foobar /dev/null {} \; | awk -F: '{print $1}' | xargs vi
grep -ir 'foo' * | awk -F '{print $1}' | xargs vim
grep -Hrli 'foo' * | xargs vim
2009-09-03 15:44:05
User: dere22
Functions: grep xargs
Tags: vim sed awk grep
3

The grep switches eliminate the need for awk and sed. Modifying vim with -p will show all files in separate tabs, -o in separate vim windows. Just wish it didn't hose my terminal once I exit vim!!

grep -ir 'foo' * | awk '{print $1}' | sed -e 's/://' | xargs vim
2009-09-03 15:12:27
User: elubow
Functions: awk grep sed xargs
Tags: vim sed awk grep
0

This will drop you into vim to edit all files that contain your grep string.

watch --interval 0 'iptables -nvL | grep -v "0 0"'
2009-08-22 18:18:05
User: Code_Bleu
Functions: grep watch
6

This will allow you to watch as matches occur in real-time. To filter out only ACCEPT, DROP, LOG..etc, then run the following command: watch 'iptables -nvL | grep -v "0 0" && grep "ACCEPT"' The -v is used to do an inverted filter. ie. NOT "0 0"

FFPID=$(pidof firefox-bin) && lsof -p $FFPID | awk '{ if($7>0) print ($7/1024/1024)" MB -- "$9; }' | grep ".mozilla" | sort -rn
2009-08-16 08:58:22
User: josue
Functions: awk grep pidof sort
6

Check which files are opened by Firefox then sort by largest size (in MB). You can see all files opened by just replacing grep to "/". Useful if you'd like to debug and check which extensions or files are taking too much memory resources in Firefox.

IFS=:; find $PATH | grep pattern
2009-08-14 13:38:58
User: camspiers
Functions: find grep
Tags: bash find grep
1

Best to put it in a file somewhere in your path. (I call the file spath)

#!/bin/bash

IFS=:; find $PATH | grep $1

Usage: $ spath php