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Commands tagged grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged grep - 336 results
find . -name "*.[ch]" -exec grep -i -H "search pharse" {} \;
2009-05-06 15:22:49
User: bunedoggle
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep
33

I have a bash alias for this command line and find it useful for searching C code for error messages.

The -H tells grep to print the filename. you can omit the -i to match the case exactly or keep the -i for case-insensitive matching.

This find command find all .c and .h files

lynx -dump randomfunfacts.com | grep -A 3 U | sed 1D
2009-05-05 07:52:10
User: xizdaqrian
Functions: grep sed
0

This is a working version, though probably clumsy, of the script submitted by felix001. This works on ubuntu and CygWin. This would be great as a bash function, defined in .bashrc. Additionally it would work as a script put in the path.

p=$(netstat -nate 2>/dev/null | awk '/LISTEN/ {gsub (/.*:/, "", $4); if ($4 == "4444") {print $8}}'); for i in $(ls /proc/|grep "^[1-9]"); do [[ $(ls -l /proc/$i/fd/|grep socket|sed -e 's|.*\[\(.*\)\]|\1|'|grep $p) ]] && cat /proc/$i/cmdline && echo; done
2009-04-30 12:39:48
User: j0rn
Functions: awk cat grep ls netstat sed
-5

Ok so it's rellay useless line and I sorry for that, furthermore that's nothing optimized at all...

At the beginning I didn't managed by using netstat -p to print out which process was handling that open port 4444, I realize at the end I was not root and security restrictions applied ;p

It's nevertheless a (good ?) way to see how ps(tree) works, as it acts exactly the same way by reading in /proc

So for a specific port, this line returns the calling command line of every thread that handle the associated socket

dpkg-query -l| grep -v "ii " | grep "rc " | awk '{print $2" "}' | tr -d "\n" | xargs aptitude purge -y
2009-04-28 19:25:53
User: thepicard
Functions: awk grep tr xargs
-3

This will, for an application that has already been removed but had its configuration left behind, purge that configuration from the system. To test it out first, you can remove the last -y, and it will show you what it will purge without actually doing it. I mean it never hurts to check first, "just in case." ;)

xmms2 mlib search NOT +rating | grep -r '^[0-9]' | sed -r 's/^([0-9]+).*/\1/' | sort -R | head | xargs -L 1 xmms2 addid
2009-04-16 20:27:30
Functions: grep head sed sort xargs
3

If you're like me and want to keep all your music rated, and you use xmms2, you might like this command.

I takes 10 random songs from your xmms2 library that don't have any rating, and adds them to your current playlist. You can then rate them in another xmms2 client that supports rating (I like kuechenstation).

I'm pretty sure there's a better way to do the grep ... | sed ... part, probably with awk, but I don't know awk, so I'd welcome any suggestions.

locate searchstring | xargs grep foo
2009-04-16 12:51:24
User: zimon
Functions: grep locate xargs
Tags: grep locate
-3

Greps located files for an expression.

Example greps all LaTeX files for 'foo':

locate *.tex | xargs grep foo

To avoid searching thousands of files with grep it could be usefull to test first how much files are returned by locate:

locate -c *.tex
alias lg='ls --color=always | grep --color=always -i'
2009-04-11 23:15:12
User: kFiddle
Functions: alias grep
Tags: ls alias color grep
6

This is a simple command, but extremely useful. It's a quick way to search the file names in the current directory for a substring. Normally people use "ls *term*" but that requires the stars and is not case insensitive. Color (for both ls and grep) is an added bonus.

svn info | grep '^URL:' | egrep -o '(tags|branches)/[^/]+|trunk' | egrep -o '[^/]+$'
2009-04-09 20:08:45
User: isaacs
Functions: egrep grep info
Tags: svn grep
2

Get the svn info, grep for the "URL" of the repository, pull out the tag/branch/trunk, and then just show the helpful/meaningful bit.

sudo tcpdump -i en1 -n -s 0 -w - | grep -a -o -E "Host\: .*|GET \/.*"
2009-04-04 01:41:48
User: peterc
Functions: grep sudo tcpdump
-2

Replace "en1" with your network interface (on OS X, usually en0, en1, eth0, etc..)

find . -name "*.py" -exec grep -n -H -E "^(import|from) math" {} \;
diff <(nmap -sP 192.168.1.0/24 | grep ^Host | sed 's/.appears to be up.//g' | sed 's/Host //g') auth.hosts | sed 's/[0-9][a-z,A-Z][0-9]$//' | sed 's/</UNAUTHORIZED IP -/g'
2009-03-12 05:28:08
User: bandit36
Functions: diff grep sed
Tags: diff sed nmap grep
1

populate the auth.hosts file with a list of IP addresses that are authorized to be in use and when you run this command it will return the addresses that are pingable and not in the authorized list.

Can be combined with the "Command line Twitter" command to tweet unauthorized access.