Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

2011-03-12 - Confoo 2011 presentation
Slides are available from the commandlinefu presentation at Confoo 2011: http://presentations.codeinthehole.com/confoo2011/
2011-01-04 - Moderation now required for new commands
To try and put and end to the spamming, new commands require moderation before they will appear on the site.
2010-12-27 - Apologies for not banning the trolls sooner
Have been away from the interwebs over Christmas. Will be more vigilant henceforth.
2010-09-24 - OAuth and pagination problems fixed
Apologies for the delay in getting Twitter's OAuth supported. Annoying pagination gremlin also fixed.
Hide

Tags

Hide

Functions

Commands tagged date from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged date - 88 results
utime(){ perl -e "print localtime($1).\"\n\"";}
2009-11-06 12:58:10
User: MoHaG
Functions: perl
1

A shell function using perl to easily convert Unix-time to text.

Put in in your ~/.bashrc or equivalent.

Tested on Linux / Solaris Bourne, bash and zsh. using perl 5.6 and higher.

(Does not require GNU date like some other commands)

perl -e 'print scalar(gmtime(1234567890)), "\n"'
echo "0t${currentEpoch}=Y" | /usr/bin/adb
2009-08-25 12:17:01
User: verboEse
Functions: echo
0

this works on Solaris, so not better than the "only-GNU"-tool :-(

I think, there is no one-liner for this, that will work on all *nix-es

git diff --numstat -w --no-abbrev | perl -a -ne '$F[0] != 0 && $F[1] !=0 && print $F[2] . "\n";'
2009-08-19 05:07:58
User: lingo
Functions: diff perl
1

Only shows files with actual changes to text (excluding whitespace). Useful if you've messed up permissions or transferred in files from windows or something like that, so that you can get a list of changed files, and clean up the rest.

curl http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/by/<your username>/rss|gzip ->commandlinefu-contribs-backup-$(date +%Y-%m-%d-%H.%M.%S).rss.gz
2009-08-10 12:43:33
Functions: date gzip
10

Use `zless` to read the content of your *rss.gz file:

zless commandlinefu-contribs-backup-2009-08-10-07.40.39.rss.gz
date --date="$(openssl x509 -in xxxxxx.crt -noout -startdate | cut -d= -f 2)" --iso-8601
2009-07-23 23:24:33
User: rez0r
Functions: date
1

A quick and simple way of outputting the start and end date of a certificate, you can simply use 'openssl x509 -in xxxxxx.crt -noout -enddate' to output the end date (ex. notAfter=Feb 01 11:30:32 2009 GMT) and with the date command you format the output to an ISO format.

For the start date use the switch -startdate and for end date use -enddate.

watch -t -n1 "date +%T|figlet"
2009-06-21 01:02:37
User: dennisw
Functions: watch
43

This command displays a clock on your terminal which updates the time every second. Press Ctrl-C to exit.

A couple of variants:

A little bit bigger text:

watch -t -n1 "date +%T|figlet -f big"

You can try other figlet fonts, too.

Big sideways characters:

watch -n 1 -t '/usr/games/banner -w 30 $(date +%M:%S)'

This requires a particular version of banner and a 40-line terminal or you can adjust the width ("30" here).

echo 2006-10-10 | grep -c '^[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]-[0-9][0-9]-[0-9][0-9]$'
2009-05-11 22:18:43
User: rez0r
Functions: echo grep
-1

Quick and easy way of validating a date format of yyyy-mm-dd and returning a boolean, the regex can easily be upgraded to handle "in betweens" for mm dd or to validate other types of strings, ex. ip address.

Boolean output could easily be piped into a condition for a more complete one-liner.

mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)
2009-04-25 14:16:45
User: thebodzio
Functions: date mkdir
Tags: alias date mkdir
11

Not a discovery but a useful one nontheless.

In the above example date format is 'yyyymmdd'. For other possible formats see 'man date'.

This command can be also very convenient when aliased to some meaningful name:

alias mkdd='mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)'
cal 09 1752
2009-04-22 00:13:19
User: flux
Functions: cal
Tags: date fun
9

The British Government entering in the Gregorian era.

date -d@1234567890
2009-04-11 22:26:41
User: kFiddle
Functions: date
Tags: date
43

This example, for example, produces the output, "Fri Feb 13 15:26:30 EST 2009"

echo $( (( $( (2**31 -1) ) - $(date +%s) )) )
2009-04-02 05:14:23
User: Chartreuse
Functions: date echo
Tags: bash echo date
0

Echos the number of seconds from the current time till the specified time (Example in command is (2**31-1)) aka the Unix epoch. Just replace that number with the specified date (in seconds past Jan. 1st 1970) and it will return the seconds.

NOTE: Only works in bash

watch -tn1 'bc<<<"`date -d'\''friday 21:00'\'' +%s`-`date +%s`"|perl -ne'\''@p=gmtime($_);printf("%dd %02d:%02d:%02d\n",@p[7,2,1,0]);'\'
2009-03-29 19:53:36
User: penpen
Functions: perl watch
Tags: Linux unix date
-2

An improved version of http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1772/simple-countdown-from-a-given-date that uses Perl to pretty-print the output. Note that the GNU-style '--no-title' option has been replaced by its one-letter counterpart '-t'.