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Commands tagged date from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged date - 97 results
tail -f file | while read line; do printf "$(date -u '+%F %T%z')\t$line\n"; done
2010-11-24 05:50:12
User: derekschrock
Functions: file printf read tail
Tags: tail date
4

Should be a bit more portable since echo -e/n and date's -Ins are not.

tail -f file | while read line; do echo -n $(date -u -Ins); echo -e "\t$line"; done
2010-11-19 10:01:57
User: hfs
Functions: date echo file read tail
Tags: tail date
6

This is useful when watching a log file that does not contain timestamps itself.

If the file already has content when starting the command, the first lines will have the "wrong" timestamp when the command was started and not when the lines were originally written.

find . -type f | while read line; do NEW_TS=`date -d@$((\`stat -c '%Y' $line\` + <seconds> )) '+%Y%m%d%H%M.%S'`; touch -t $NEW_TS ${line}; done
2010-11-18 14:03:32
User: angleto
Functions: find read touch
1

Increase the modification date for the files selected with the find command.

echo Good $(i=`date +%H` ; if [ $i -lt 12 ] ; then echo morning ; else if [ $i -lt 15 ] ; then echo afternoon ; else echo evening ; fi ; fi)
2010-09-23 09:50:13
User: jyro
Functions: echo
Tags: date
0

Saves all the "cut" hacks

LASTMONTHNUM=`date -d "last month" +%m`
LASTMONTH=`date -d "last month" +%B`
package=$1; list=/var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list; inst=$(stat "$list" -c %X); cat $list | (while read file; do if [ -f "$file" ];then acc=$(stat "$file" -c %X); if [ $inst -lt $acc ]; then echo used $file; exit 0; fi; fi; done; exit 1)
2010-09-20 18:10:19
User: pipeliner
Functions: cat echo exit read stat
Tags: apt dpkg date stat
1

This script compares the modification date of /var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list and all the files mentioned there.

It could be wrong on noatime partitions.

Here is non-oneliner:

#!/bin/sh

package=$1;

list=/var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list;

inst=$(stat "$list" -c %X);

cat $list |

(

while read file; do

if [ -f "$file" ]; then

acc=$(stat "$file" -c %X);

if [ $inst -lt $acc ]; then

echo used $file

exit 0

fi;

fi;

done

exit 1

)

date --date=yesterday +%Y%m%d
2010-09-08 12:29:31
User: vinayv
Functions: date
Tags: bash date
2

The "date' command has options to easily format the date, day, month, time, etc. But what if you want a relative date or time. Like, I wanted yesterday's date in a particular format. You may want the exact date of "2 months ago" or "-3 days" nicely formatted. For that, you can use this command. The --date option takes fuzzy parameters like the ones mentioned in the previous sentence.

truss date 2>&1 | awk '/^time/{print $3}'
echo "($(date +%s)-$(date +%s -d "march 1"))/86400"|bc
2010-07-22 19:44:50
User: nickwe
Functions: echo
Tags: echo bc date
2

Exactly the same number of characters, exactly the same results, but with bc

TZ=PST8PDT+72 date '+%Y_%m_%d'
2010-07-02 00:29:27
Functions: date
Tags: date nongnu
4

This command prints the Date (Not time) from 3 days ago (72 hours ago).

This works on systems without GNU date (MacOSX , Solaris, FreeBSD).

sudo find . -maxdepth 1 -cnewer olderFilesNameToMove -and ! -cnewer newerFileNameToMove -exec mv -v {} /newDirectory/ \;
2010-06-30 20:40:30
User: javamaniac
Functions: find mv sudo
2

In a folder with many files and folders, you want to move all files where the date is >= the file olderFilesNameToMove and

watch -tn1 'date -u +%T -d @$(expr $(date -d HH:MM +%s) - $(date +%s)) | toilet -f bigmono12'
2010-06-26 11:56:11
User: prayer
Functions: date expr watch
Tags: date time
-2

Change HH:MM with your target time.

This is for a Debian/Ubuntu GNU system. You need bash (package bash), date (package coreutils) and toilet (package toilet). Install with:

# apt-get install bash coreutils toilet toilet-fonts

touch file-$(date +%Y%m%d)
grep -i "$(date +%b\ %d\ %H)" syslog
2010-05-23 16:18:15
User: rubenmoran
Functions: grep
Tags: log date
6

Uses date to grep de logfile for today and uses it to get the last hour logs. Can be used to get last minute logs or today's logs.

utime(){ python -c "import time; print(time.strftime('%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y', time.localtime($1)))"; }
utime(){ awk -v d=$1 'BEGIN{print strftime("%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y", d)}'; }
utime(){ date -d "1970-01-01 GMT $1 seconds"; }
utime { date -d @$1; }
2010-05-12 12:21:15
User: deltaray
Functions: date
4

More recent versions of the date command finally have the ability to decode the unix epoch time into a human readable date. This function makes it simple to utilize this feature quickly.

alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
21

If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command.

# creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com

ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10

# create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory

tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz .

I personally find myself having to reference

date --help

quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner.

Here's the old version:

alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t'

This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ]

date +%A | cut -c $(( $(date +%A | wc -c) - 1 ))
2010-04-07 00:23:15
User: DaveQB
Functions: cut date wc
Tags: bash echo cut date wc
0

A command to find out what the day ends in. Can be edited slightly to find out what "any" output ends in.

NB: I haven't tested with weird and wonderful output.

function ends_in_y() { case $(date +%A) in *y ) true ;; * ) false ;; esac } ; ends_in_y && echo ok
2010-04-06 22:18:52
Functions: date echo false true
-1

The shell has perfectly adequate pattern matching for simple expressions.

function ends_in_y() { if [ `date +%A | sed -e 's/\(^.*\)\(.$\)/\2/'` == "y" ]; then echo 1; else echo 0; fi }
2010-04-06 20:14:34
User: allrightname
Functions: echo sed
-3

For those days when you need to know if something is happening because the day ends in "y".

sed -i 's/20[0-1][0-9]\{7\}/'`date +%Y%m%d%I`'/g' *.db
2010-03-24 07:28:58
User: alf
Functions: sed
6

Will edit *.db files in the same directory with todays date. Useful for doing a mass update to domains on a nameserver, adding spf records, etc.

Looks for a string starting with 200 or 201 followed by 7 numbers, and replaces with todays date. This won't overwrite Ip's but i would still do some double checking after running this.

Make sure your server's date is correct, otherwise insert your own serial number.

rndc reload

should usually follow this command.

date -j -v1d -v-0m -v-1d +'%m %d %Y'
2010-03-04 17:47:51
User: drewk
Functions: date
-4

This produces a parseable output of the last day of the month in future or past. Change the '-v-0m' to be a month plus or minus from the current system time.