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Commands tagged ssh from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged ssh - 163 results
lol=`zenity --file-selection --directory` && DISPLAY=:0.1 cvlc -f -I ncurses --play-and-stop "$lol"
2010-09-12 01:10:16
User: rusino
Tags: ssh vlc
0

use this command via ssh on remote machine when you want play video

remove --directory if you want select single file

lol=`zenity --entry` && DISPLAY=:0.1 cvlc -f -I ncurses --play-and-exit "$lol"
2010-09-12 01:02:53
User: rusino
Tags: ssh vlc
0

use this command via ssh on remote machine when you want play video stream or path to file

~.
2010-09-04 15:13:10
User: xeor
Tags: ssh
22

~ is the ssh control character. If you type it after a newline, you can example force close the ssh session.

, ~, then .

If you want more info, type ~? when you are connecting using ssh.

Very useful to kill of any hanging ssh sessions when nothing else works.

mussh -h host1 host2 host3 -c uptime
echo "uptime" | tee >(ssh host1) >(ssh host2) >(ssh host3)
echo "uptime" | pee "ssh host1" "ssh host2" "ssh host3"
2010-08-20 11:42:40
User: dooblem
Functions: echo
Tags: ssh parallel pee
15

The pee command is in the moreutils package.

xargs -n1 -P100 -I{} sh -c 'ssh {} uptime >output/{} 2>error/{}' <hostlist
2010-08-20 11:03:11
User: dooblem
Functions: sh uptime xargs
3

Do the same as pssh, just in shell syntax.

Put your hosts in hostlist, one per line.

Command outputs are gathered in output and error directories.

scp $user@$server:$path/to/file .
file=ftp://ftp.gimp.org/pub/gimp/v2.6/gimp-2.6.10.tar.bz2; ssh server "wget $file -O -" > $PWD/${file##*/}
2010-08-02 15:59:45
User: michaelmior
Functions: file ssh
Tags: ssh bash download
2

This command will download $file via server. I've used this when FTP was broken at the office and I needed to download some software packages.

curl -L -s `curl -s http://www.2600.com/oth-broadband.xml` | xmlstarlet sel -t -m "//enclosure[1]" -v "@url" -n | head -n 1` | ssh -t [user]@[host] "mpg123 -"
0

Ever wanted to stream your favorite podcast across the network, well now you can.

This command will parse the iTunes enabled podcast and stream the latest episode across the network through ssh encryption.

ssh [user]@[host] "ogg123 -" < [podcast].ogg
ssh [user]@[address] "mpg321 -" < [file].mp3
2010-07-30 00:23:13
User: leovailati
Functions: ssh
6

This one doesn't need to convert to wav.

sox Klaxon.mp3 -t wav - |ssh thelab@company.com paplay
2010-07-29 23:23:39
User: camocrazed
Functions: ssh
7

This will allow you to convert an audio file to wav format, and send it via ssh to a player on the other computer, which will open and play it there. Of course, substitute your information for the sound file and remote address

You do not have to use paplay on the remote end, as it is a PulseAudio thing. If the remote end uses ALSA, you should use aplay instead. If it uses OSS, you should berate them about having a lousy sound system. Also, you're not limited to transmitting encoded as wav either, it's just that AFAIK, most systems don't come with mp3 codecs, but will play wav files fine.

If you know SoX is installed on the remote end and has mp3 codecs, you can use the following instead:

cat Klaxon.mp3 |ssh thelab@company.com play -t mp3 -

this will transmit as mp3. Again, use your specific information. if you're not playing mp3s, use another type with the -t option

for host in host1 host2 host3; do ssh -n user@$host <command> > $host.log & done; wait
2010-07-14 14:55:31
User: cout
Functions: host ssh
1

Ssh to host1, host2, and host3, executing on each host and saving the output in {host}.log.

I don't have the 'parallel' command installed, otherwise it sounds interesting and less cryptic.

tsocks <program>
2010-07-11 14:16:06
User: prayer
Tags: ssh SOCKS
5

Require:

- tsocks (deb pkg)

- A working SOCKS proxy. It's easy with ssh:

$ ssh -N -D localhost:1080 your.home.pc -p 443

- tsocks configuration in your /etc/tsocks.conf (for the previous):

server = 127.0.0.1

server_port = 1080

dd if=/dev/zero bs=4096 count=1048576 | ssh user@host.tld 'cat > /dev/null'
2010-06-08 18:49:51
User: atoponce
Functions: dd ssh
Tags: ssh dd
5

The above command will send 4GB of data from one host to the next over the network, without consuming any unnecessary disk on either the client nor the host. This is a quick and dirty way to benchmark network speed without wasting any time or disk space.

Of course, change the byte size and count as necessary.

This command also doesn't rely on any extra 3rd party utilities, as dd, ssh, cat, /dev/zero and /dev/null are installed on all major Unix-like operating systems.

autossh -N -D localhost:1080 myhome.example.net -p 443
2010-05-22 19:52:30
User: prayer
Tags: ssh net
2

You may go to Internet by means of your home ssh server. You must configure your local proxy to send traffic through the proxy. Many programs allows that: firefox, pidgin, skype, gnome, etc.

Your home ssh server must listen in any of the ports permitted by your enterprise firewall. That usually includes 80 and 443.

echo 'Host or User@Host?:'; read newserver && ssh-keygen -N "" -t rsa -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa ; ssh $newserver cat <~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub ">>" ~/.ssh/authorized_keys ; ssh $newserver
2010-05-07 06:24:53
User: alf
Functions: cat echo read ssh ssh-keygen
Tags: ssh ssh-keygen
-2

Some servers don't have ssh-copy-id, this works in those cases.

It will ask for the destination server, this can be IP, hostname, or user@hostname if different from current user.

Ssh keygen will let you know if a pubkey already exists on your system and you can opt to not overwrite it.

rsync --delete -az -e 'ssh -c blowfish -i /your/.ssh/backup_key -ax' /path/to/backup remote-host:/dest/path/
ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null root@192.168.1.1
2010-04-08 14:55:58
User: oernii2
Functions: ssh
Tags: ssh
8

you may create an alias also, which I did ;-)

alias sshu="ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null "

ssh -t server 'cd /etc && $SHELL'
2010-04-02 19:34:09
User: dooblem
Functions: ssh
Tags: ssh
4

Useful to create an alias that sends you right in the directory you want :

alias server-etc="ssh -t server 'cd /etc && $SHELL'"

echo 'ServerAliveInterval 60' >> /etc/ssh/ssh_config
2010-03-31 09:22:54
User: rpavlick
Functions: echo
Tags: ssh timeout
6

ssh_config is the system-wide configuration file for ssh.

For per-user configuration, which allows for different settings for each host:

echo 'ServerAliveInterval 60' >> ~/.ssh/ssh_config

On OSX:

echo 'ServerAliveInterval 60' >> ~/.ssh/config

or

echo 'ServerAliveInterval 60' >> ~/etc/ssh_config
ssh user@host "cat /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2" |tar jpxf -
2010-03-24 01:35:28
User: mack
Functions: ssh tar
Tags: ssh tar
8

Here how to recover the remote backup over ssh

tar jcpf - [sourceDirs] |ssh user@host "cat > /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2"
2010-03-24 01:29:25
User: mack
Functions: ssh tar
Tags: ssh tar
13

Execute it from the source host, where the source files you wish backup resides. With the minus '-' the tar command deliver the compressed output to the standar output and, trough over the ssh session to the remote host. On the other hand the backup host will be receive the stream and read it from the standar input sending it to the /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2

for I in $(mysql -e 'show databases' -u root --password=root -s --skip-column-names); do mysqldump -u root --password=root $I | gzip -c | ssh user@server.com "cat > /remote/$I.sql.gz"; done
2010-03-07 15:03:12
User: juliend2
Functions: gzip ssh
6

It grabs all the database names granted for the $MYSQLUSER and gzip them to a remote host via SSH.