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Commands tagged bash from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged bash - 726 results
iconv -f437 -tutf8 asciiart.nfo
2009-07-11 23:50:05
User: speaker
Functions: iconv

Files containing ascii art (e.g. with .nfo extension) are typically not correctly reproduced at the command line when using cat. With iconv one can easily write a wrapper to solve this:


if [ -z "$@" ]; then echo "Usage: $(basename $0) file [file] ..."

else iconv -f437 -tutf8 "$@"; fi

exit 0
for y in $(seq 2009 2011); do cal $y; done
2009-07-10 10:07:46
Functions: cal seq
Tags: bash seq cal

print multiple increasing years using cal - calendar -. You can also try

seq Start Increment End
/originalInstall/gem list | tr -d '(),' | xargs -L 1 sudo ./gemInst.sh
2009-07-09 21:46:06
User: snakerdlk
Functions: sudo tr xargs
Tags: bash Linux



for i in $@; do

if [ "$1" != "$i" ]


echo /newInstall/gem install $1 -v=\"$i\"

/newInstall/gem install $1 -v="$i"

if [ "$?" != "0" ]


echo -e "\n\nGEM INSTALL ERROR: $1\n\n"

echo "$1" > gemInst.err




export IFS=$(echo -e "\n")
2009-07-09 15:25:37
User: darkpand
Functions: echo export

When you use a "for" construct, it cycles on every word. If you want to cycle on a line-by-line basis (and, well, you can't use xargs -n1 :D), you can set the IFS variable to .

l=500; x=500; y=200; d=-15;for i in `seq $x $d $y`; do beep -l $l -f $i;done
2009-07-07 22:12:20
Tags: bash beep sound

Generates a frequency sweep from $x to $y, with $d numbers inbetween each step, and with each tone lasting $l milliseconds.

? () { echo "$*" | bc -l; }
2009-06-28 20:15:30
User: fizz
Functions: bc echo

defines a handy function for quick calculations from cli.

once defined:

? 10*2+3
for i in *;do mv "$i" "$(echo $i | sed s/PROBLEM/FIX/g)";done
2009-06-28 01:50:25
User: AlecSchueler
Functions: mv

Useful if non-ascii characters in filenames have been improperly encoded. Replace "PROBLEM" with the incorrect characters (e.g. 'é'), and "FIX" with the correct ones (e.g. '?').

echo {0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}
2009-06-23 17:30:20
User: dennisw
Functions: echo

If you should happen to find yourself needing some binary numbers, this is a quickie way of doing it. If you need more digits, just add more "{0..1}" sequences for each digit you need. You can assign them to an array, too, and access them by their decimal equivalent for a quickie binary to decimal conversion (for larger values it's probably better to use another method). Note: this works in bash, ksh and zsh. For zsh, though, you'll need to issue a setopt KSH_ARRAYS to make the array zero-based.


echo ${binary[9]}
(Command too long..See sample Output..)
2009-06-14 20:34:37
User: mohan43u
Tags: bash sed echo tr od

curl doesn't provide url-encoding for 'GET' data, it have an option '--data-urlencode', but its only for 'POST' data. Thats why I need to write down this commandline. With 'perl', 'php' and 'python', this is one liner, but just I wrote it for fun. Works in Ubuntu, will work in all linux varients(I hope it will work in unix varients also).

a=`printf "%*s" 16`;b=${a//?/{0..1\}}; echo `eval "echo $b"`
chronic () { t=$1; shift; while true; do $@; sleep $t; done & }
2009-06-13 05:57:54
User: rhythmx
Functions: sleep

Chronic Bash function:

chronic 3600 time # Print the time in your shell every hour chronic 60 updatedb > /dev/null # update slocate every minute

Note: use 'jobs' to list background tasks and fg/bg to take control of them.

URL=http://svn.example.org/project; diff -u <(TZ=UTC svn -q log -r1:HEAD $URL | grep \|) <(TZ=UTC svn log -q $URL | grep \| | sort -k3 -t \|)
2009-06-03 14:26:55
User: sunny256
Functions: diff grep sort
Tags: bash svn

Lists revisions in a Subversion repository with a timestamp that doesn't follow the revision numbering order. If everything is OK, nothing is displayed.

for k in `git branch|perl -pe s/^..//`;do echo -e `git show --pretty=format:"%Cgreen%ci %Cblue%cr%Creset" $k|head -n 1`\\t$k;done|sort -r
2009-06-03 08:25:00
User: brunost
Functions: echo head perl sort

Print out list of all branches with last commit date to the branch, including relative time since commit and color coding.

svn log fileName|cut -d" " -f 1|grep -e "^r[0-9]\{1,\}$"|awk {'sub(/^r/,"",$1);print "svn cat fileName@"$1" > /tmp/fileName.r"$1'}|sh
2009-05-27 02:11:58
User: fizz
Functions: awk cut grep
Tags: bash svn awk grep

exported files will get a .r23 extension (where 23 is the revision number)

sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e
2009-05-25 05:37:44
User: mohan43u
Functions: echo sed xargs
echo "http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com" | sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e


Works under bash on linux. just alter the '-e' option to its corresponding equivalence in your system to execute escape characters correctly.

diff -uw <(fmt -1 {file1, file2})
2009-05-23 03:11:08
User: sunny256
Functions: diff fmt
Tags: bash diff

It can be hard to spot differences in reformatted files, because of all the diff noise created by word wrapped lines. This command removes all the noise and performs a word-by-word diff. To ignore empty lines, add -B to the diff command. Also, if this is something you do often, you might want to check out the wdiff(1) program.

diff <(cd dir1 && find | sort) <(cd dir2 && find | sort)
2009-05-21 04:44:29
User: mbirk
Functions: cd diff find
Tags: bash diff find

This uses Bash's "process substitution" feature to compare (using diff) the output of two different process pipelines.

cd "$(mktemp -d)"
2009-05-20 11:48:12
User: Weboide
Functions: cd
Tags: bash directory

This command create a new temp directory using mktemp (to avoid collisions) and change the current working directory to the created directory.

expanded_script=$(eval "echo \"$(cat ${sed_script_file})\"") && sed -e "${expanded_script}" your_input_file
2009-05-07 14:21:14
Functions: eval sed

With this command you can use shell variables inside sed scripts.

This is useful if the script MUST remain in an external file, otherwise you can simply use an inline -e argument to sed.

screen -d -m nautilus --no-desktop `pwd`
2009-05-07 00:49:07
User: windsurfer
Functions: screen

This opens up nautilus in the current directory, which is useful for some quick file management that isn't efficiently done from a terminal.

2009-05-06 08:01:06
User: P17
Tags: bash

The colors are defined as variables.




shopt -s globstar
2009-05-05 16:02:44
User: Alanceil

Since bash 4.0, you can use ** to recursively expand to all files in the current directory. This behaviour is disabled by default, this command enables it (you'd best put it in your .profile). See the sample output for clarification.

In my opinion this is much better than creating hacks with find and xargs when you want to pass files to an application.

alias somafm='read -p "Which station? "; mplayer --reallyquiet -vo none -ao sdl http://somafm.com/startstream=${REPLY}.pls'
2009-05-05 12:13:46
User: denzuko
Functions: alias

This is the alias command that I discussed in my prior release which you can add to your ~/.bashrc.

This command asks for the station name and then connects to somafm, Great for those who have linux home entertainment boxes and ssh enabled on them, just for the CLI fiends out there ( I know I'm one of them ;)

You can find future releases of this and many more scripts at the teachings of master denzuko - denzuko.co.cc.