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Commands tagged bash from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged bash - 695 results
<Alt+.>
2012-03-04 00:30:56
User: alphapapa
Tags: bash hotkey
1

Just like "!$", except it does it instantly. Then you can hit enter if you want.

command <<< word
2012-02-29 03:14:54
User: adeverteuil
Functions: command
Tags: bash stdin
10

Don't do this:

echo word | command

Using a bash "here strings" and "here documents" look leeter than piping echo into the command. Also prevents subshell execution. Word is also expanded as usual.

find . -depth -name '* *' -execdir bash \-c 'a="{}";mv -f "$a" ${a// /_}' \;
2012-02-28 04:03:40
User: DewiMorgan
Functions: bash find mv
0

Sometimes, you don't want to just replace the spaces in the current folder, but through the whole folder tree - such as your whole music collection, perhaps. Or maybe you want to do some other renaming operation throughout a tree - this command's useful for that, too.

To rename stuff through a whole directory tree, you might expect this to work:

for a in `find . -name '* *'`;do mv -i "$a" ${a// /_};done

No such luck. The "for" command will split its parameters on spaces unless the spaces are escaped, so given a file "foo bar", the above would not try to move the file "foo bar" to "foo_bar" but rather the file "foo" to "foo", and the file "bar" to "bar". Instead, find's -execdir and -depth arguments need to be used, to set a variable to the filename, and rename files within the directory before we rename the directory.

It has to be -execdir and won't work with just -exec - that would try to rename "foo bar/baz quux" to "foo_bar/baz_quux" in one step, rather than going into "foo bar/", changing "baz quux" to "baz_quux", then stepping out and changing "foo bar/" into "foo_bar/".

To rename just files, or just directories, you can put "-type f" or "-type d" after the "-depth" param.

You could probably safely replace the "mv" part of the line with a "rename" command, like rename 'y/ /_/' *, but I haven't tried, since that's way less portable.

for ((x=0;;x+=5)); do sleep 5; espeak $x & done
2012-02-22 00:26:57
User: adeverteuil
Functions: sleep
Tags: audio bash timer
5

Useful contexts :

You are doing yoga or some other physical training in which you are holding a position.

Or you practice the pomodoro productivity technique.

Or your girlfriend said "We're leaving in 40 minutes".

Design details:

sleep executes before espeak to give you a 5 seconds head start.

espeak is run in the background so it doesn't mess up the timing.

testt(){ o=abcdefghLkprsStuwxOGN;echo $@;for((i=0;i<${#o};i++));do c=${o:$i:1};test -$c $1 && help test | sed "/^ *-$c/!d;1q;s/^[^T]*/-$c /;s/ if/ -/";done; }
2012-02-21 16:54:53
User: AskApache
Functions: echo sed test
2

Applies each file operator using the built-in test.

testt /home/askapache/.sq

/home/askapache/.sq

-a True - file exists.

-d True - file is a directory.

-e True - file exists.

-r True - file is readable by you.

-s True - file exists and is not empty.

-w True - the file is writable by you.

-x True - the file is executable by you.

-O True - the file is effectively owned by you.

-G True - the file is effectively owned by your group.

-N True - the file has been modified since it was last read.

Full Function:

testt ()

{

local dp;

until [ -z "${1:-}" ]; do

dp="$1";

[[ ! -a "$1" ]] && dp="$PWD/$dp";

command ls -w $((${COLUMNS:-80}-20)) -lA --color=tty -d "$dp";

[[ -d "$dp" ]] && find "$dp" -mount -depth -wholename "$dp" -printf '%.5m %10M %#15s %#9u %-9g %#5U %-5G %Am/%Ad/%AY %Cm/%Cd/%CY %Tm/%Td/%TY [%Y] %p\n' -a -quit 2> /dev/null;

for f in a b c d e f g h L k p r s S t u w x O G N;

do

test -$f "$dp" && help test | sed "/-$f F/!d" | sed -e 's#^[\t ]*-\([a-zA-Z]\{1\}\) F[A-Z]*[\t ]* True if#-\1 "'$dp'" #g';

done;

shift;

done

}

grep $'\t' sample.txt
cmdfu(){ local t=~/cmdfu;echo -e "\n# $1 {{{1">>$t;curl -s "commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/$1/`echo -n $1|base64`/plaintext"|sed '1,2d;s/^#.*/& {{{2/g'>$t;vim -u /dev/null -c "set ft=sh fdm=marker fdl=1 noswf" -M $t;rm $t; }
2012-02-21 05:43:16
User: AskApache
Functions: echo rm sed vim
6

Here is the full function (got trunctated), which is much better and works for multiple queries.

function cmdfu () {

local t=~/cmdfu;

until [[ -z $1 ]]; do

echo -e "\n# $1 {{{1" >> $t;

curl -s "commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/$1/`echo -n $1|base64`/plaintext" | sed '1,2d;s/^#.*/& {{{2/g' | tee -a $t > $t.c;

sed -i "s/^# $1 {/# $1 - `grep -c '^#' $t.c` {/" $t;

shift;

done;

vim -u /dev/null -c "set ft=sh fdm=marker fdl=1 noswf" -M $t;

rm $t $t.c

}

Searches commandlinefu for single/multiple queries and displays syntax-highlighted, folded, and numbered results in vim.

mtr google.com
2012-02-19 22:27:48
User: d_voge
-1

You need to have mtr installed on your host.

for i in {1..30}; do ping -t $i -c 1 google.com; done | grep "Time to live exceeded"
2012-02-19 13:37:04
User: fossilet
Functions: grep ping
12

This command uses ping to get the routers' IP addresses to the destination host as traceroute does. If you know what I mean..

sed -e 's/[;|][[:space:]]*/\n/g' .bash_history | cut --delimiter=' ' --fields=1 | sort | uniq --count | sort --numeric-sort --reverse | head --lines=20
regenerateCSR () { openssl genrsa -out $2 2048; openssl x509 -x509toreq -in $1 -out $3 -signkey $2; }
echo -n '#!'$(which awk)
sudo curl "http://hg.mindrot.org/openssh/raw-file/c746d1a70cfa/contrib/ssh-copy-id" -o /usr/bin/ssh-copy-id && sudo chmod 755 /usr/bin/ssh-copy-id
2012-02-09 20:29:24
User: misterich
Functions: chmod sudo
-1

Mac install ssh-copy-id

From there on out, you would upload keys to a server like this:

(make sure to double quote the full path to your key)

ssh-copy-id -i "/PATH/TO/YOUR/PRIVATE/KEY" username@server

or, if your SSH server uses a different port (often, they will require that the port be '2222' or some other nonsense:

(note the double quotes on *both* the "/path/to/key" and "user@server -pXXXX"):

ssh-copy-id -i "/PATH/TO/YOUR/PRIVATE/KEY" "username@server -pXXXX"

...where XXXX is the ssh port on that server

echo -n "IP Address or Machine Name: "; read IP; ping -c 1 -q $IP >/dev/null 2>&1 && echo -e "\e[00;32mOnline\e[00m" || echo -e "\e[00;31mOffline\e[00m"
2012-02-09 07:00:03
User: crlf
Functions: echo ping read
Tags: bash echo IP ping
1

I have used single packet, and in a silent mode with no display of ping stats. This is with color and UI improvement to the http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10220/check-if-a-machine-is-online. It is as per the enhancements suggested.

:autocmd BufNewFile *.sh,*.bash 0put =\"#!/bin/bash\<nl># -*- coding: UTF8 -*-\<nl>\<nl>\"|$
2012-02-06 08:28:05
User: jlaunay
Tags: bash
0

or add this line to your ~/.vimrc if using vim

echo '#!'$(which bash) > script.sh
2012-02-06 08:25:27
User: sharfah
Functions: echo which
Tags: bash
-4

Writes out the shebang line (#!/bin/bash) to the script.

{ echo -n '#!'; which bash; } > script.sh
sed -i 6,66d <filename>
2012-02-04 02:29:40
User: icsamples
Functions: sed
Tags: bash sed
0

Delete range of lines. Ex: Line 6 through 66 in .

sed -i <file> -re '<start>,<end>d'
sed -i <start>,<end>d <filename>
perl -i -ne 'print if $. == 3..5' <filename>
vi +'<start>,<end>d' +wq <filename>
${path//'/'/'\/'}
2012-01-27 02:50:01
User: captaincomic
Tags: bash
0

For example

path="/etc/apt/sources.list"; echo ${path//'/'/'\/'}

will print

\/etc\/apt\/sources.list
vi +START,ENDd +wq sample.txt
2012-01-26 20:47:35
User: titan2x
Functions: vi
Tags: bash vi
1

Deletes lines from START to END, inclusive. For example +4,10d will delete line 4, 5, ..., 10. Just like the vi command :4,10d does it.

vi +{<end>..<start>}d +wq <filename>
2012-01-26 20:36:04
User: javidjamae
Functions: vi
Tags: bash vi
1

Deletes lines to of a file. You must put the end line first in the range for the curly brace expansion, otherwise it will not work properly.