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Commands tagged bash from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged bash - 712 results
svn log fileName|cut -d" " -f 1|grep -e "^r[0-9]\{1,\}$"|awk {'sub(/^r/,"",$1);print "svn cat fileName@"$1" > /tmp/fileName.r"$1'}|sh
2009-05-27 02:11:58
User: fizz
Functions: awk cut grep
Tags: bash svn awk grep
2

exported files will get a .r23 extension (where 23 is the revision number)

sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e
2009-05-25 05:37:44
User: mohan43u
Functions: echo sed xargs
10
echo "http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com" | sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e

http://www.google.com

Works under bash on linux. just alter the '-e' option to its corresponding equivalence in your system to execute escape characters correctly.

diff -uw <(fmt -1 {file1, file2})
2009-05-23 03:11:08
User: sunny256
Functions: diff fmt
Tags: bash diff
3

It can be hard to spot differences in reformatted files, because of all the diff noise created by word wrapped lines. This command removes all the noise and performs a word-by-word diff. To ignore empty lines, add -B to the diff command. Also, if this is something you do often, you might want to check out the wdiff(1) program.

echo $BASH_VERSION
diff <(cd dir1 && find | sort) <(cd dir2 && find | sort)
2009-05-21 04:44:29
User: mbirk
Functions: cd diff find
Tags: bash diff find
30

This uses Bash's "process substitution" feature to compare (using diff) the output of two different process pipelines.

cd "$(mktemp -d)"
2009-05-20 11:48:12
User: Weboide
Functions: cd
Tags: bash directory
8

This command create a new temp directory using mktemp (to avoid collisions) and change the current working directory to the created directory.

expanded_script=$(eval "echo \"$(cat ${sed_script_file})\"") && sed -e "${expanded_script}" your_input_file
2009-05-07 14:21:14
Functions: eval sed
-1

With this command you can use shell variables inside sed scripts.

This is useful if the script MUST remain in an external file, otherwise you can simply use an inline -e argument to sed.

screen -d -m nautilus --no-desktop `pwd`
2009-05-07 00:49:07
User: windsurfer
Functions: screen
-10

This opens up nautilus in the current directory, which is useful for some quick file management that isn't efficiently done from a terminal.

PS1="$BLUE[$CYAN\u$BLUE@$CYAN\h$WHITE-bash \v:$GREEN\w$BLUE]$WHITE \$ "
2009-05-06 08:01:06
User: P17
Tags: bash
-3

The colors are defined as variables.

e.g.

RED="\[\033[01;31m\]"

BLUE="\[\033[01;34m\]"

shopt -s globstar
2009-05-05 16:02:44
User: Alanceil
11

Since bash 4.0, you can use ** to recursively expand to all files in the current directory. This behaviour is disabled by default, this command enables it (you'd best put it in your .profile). See the sample output for clarification.

In my opinion this is much better than creating hacks with find and xargs when you want to pass files to an application.

alias somafm='read -p "Which station? "; mplayer --reallyquiet -vo none -ao sdl http://somafm.com/startstream=${REPLY}.pls'
2009-05-05 12:13:46
User: denzuko
Functions: alias
-2

This is the alias command that I discussed in my prior release which you can add to your ~/.bashrc.

This command asks for the station name and then connects to somafm, Great for those who have linux home entertainment boxes and ssh enabled on them, just for the CLI fiends out there ( I know I'm one of them ;)

You can find future releases of this and many more scripts at the teachings of master denzuko - denzuko.co.cc.

lynx -dump randomfunfacts.com | grep -A 3 U | sed 1D
2009-05-05 07:52:10
User: xizdaqrian
Functions: grep sed
0

This is a working version, though probably clumsy, of the script submitted by felix001. This works on ubuntu and CygWin. This would be great as a bash function, defined in .bashrc. Additionally it would work as a script put in the path.

export LSCOLORS=gxfxcxdxbxegedabagacad
2009-05-04 04:07:36
User: haivu
Functions: export
Tags: bash ls osx
2

I use terminal with black background on the Mac. Unfortunately, the default ls color for the directory is blue, which is very hard to see. By including the line above in my ~/.bash_profile file, I changed the directory's color to cyan, which is easer to see. For more information on the syntax of the LSCOLORS shell variable:

man ls

I tested this command on Mac OS X Leopard

read -p "Which station? "; mplayer --reallyquiet -vo none -ao sdl http://somafm.com/startstream=${REPLY}.pls
2009-05-04 00:26:19
User: denzuko
Functions: read
11

This command asks for the station name and then connects to somafm, Great for those who have linux home entertainment boxes and ssh enabled on them, just for the CLI fiends out there ( I know I'm one of them ;)

Also, don't forget to add this as alias(ie alias somafm="read -p 'Which Station? "; mplayer --reallyquite -vo none -ao sdl

cd $(dirname $(find ~ -name emails.txt))
2009-05-01 21:26:58
User: haivu
Functions: cd dirname find
Tags: bash dirname
9

This command looks for a single file named emails.txt which is located somewhere in my home directory and cd to that directory. This command is especially helpful when the file is burried deep in the directory structure. I tested it against the bash shells in Xubuntu 8.10 and Mac OS X Leopard 10.5.6

while :; do xfconf-query -c xfce4-desktop -p /backdrop/screen0/monitor0/image-path -s "$(find <image-directory> -type f -iregex '.*\.\(bmp\|gif\|jpg\|png\)$' | sort -R | head -1)"; sleep 30m; done
2009-04-30 03:09:52
Functions: sleep
Tags: bash find xfce
2

Change your wallpaper every thirty minutes (or however long you like, I suppose) to a randomly selected image in a directory and subdirectories. Bear in mind this is not safe to use if anyone else has write access to your image directory.

ls -S -lhr
2009-04-28 01:28:57
User: rez0r
Functions: ls
3

This command list and sort files by size and in reverse order, the reverse order is very helpful when you have a very long list and wish to have the biggest files at the bottom so you don't have scrool up.

The file size info is in human readable output, so ex. 1K..234M...3G

Tested with Linux (Red Hat Enterprise Edition)

history -d
2009-04-27 20:19:09
User: sud0er
Tags: bash
28

If you're a moron like me, sometimes your fingers get away from you and you, for example, enter your password when you're already authenticated to ssh-agent, sudo, etc., and your password ends up in shell history. Here's how to get it out.

for i in sys dev proc; do sudo mount --bind /$i /mnt/xxx/$i; done
2009-04-20 16:52:14
User: amosshapira
Functions: mount sudo
Tags: bash mount chroot
3

The command is useful when, e.g., booting an existing system with a rescue or installation CD where you need to chroot into the hard-disk and be able to do stuff which accesses kernel info (e.g. when installing Ubuntu desktop with LVM2 you need to mount and chroot the hard disk from a shell window in order to install packages and run initramfs inside chroot).

The command assumes that /mnt/xxx is where the chroot'ed environment's root file system on the hard disk is mounted.

xmms2 mlib search NOT +rating | grep -r '^[0-9]' | sed -r 's/^([0-9]+).*/\1/' | sort -R | head | xargs -L 1 xmms2 addid
2009-04-16 20:27:30
Functions: grep head sed sort xargs
3

If you're like me and want to keep all your music rated, and you use xmms2, you might like this command.

I takes 10 random songs from your xmms2 library that don't have any rating, and adds them to your current playlist. You can then rate them in another xmms2 client that supports rating (I like kuechenstation).

I'm pretty sure there's a better way to do the grep ... | sed ... part, probably with awk, but I don't know awk, so I'd welcome any suggestions.

disown -a && exit
kill %1
history | grep ssh
2009-04-03 01:35:52
User: haivu
Functions: grep
Tags: bash csh
-9

After seeing the command you wish to repeat, just invoke it using the ! syntax.

sudo vi /etc/fstab; Go//smb-share/gino /mnt/place smbfs defaults,username=gino,password=pass 0 0<esc>:wq; mount //smb-share/gino
2009-04-02 16:04:35
User: GinoMan2440
Functions: mount sudo vi
4

the middle command between the ; and ; is the vi commands that insert that line into the last line of the file, the esc with the carets is literally hitting the escape key, you have to have the smbfs package installed to do it, I use it to access my iTunes music on my mac from my linux PC's with amarok so I can play the music anywhere in the house. among other things, it allows you to access the files on that share from your computer anytime you're on that network.

read -p 'Username: ' u;sudo -H -u $u xauth add $(xauth list|grep :$(echo ${DISPLAY: -4:2}));sudo su - $u