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Commands tagged vim from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged vim - 140 results
tac $FILE
printf "g/^/m0\nw\nq"|ed $FILE
alias viaco='task="$(basename "$(pwd)")"; if [ -f "$task.c" ]; then vi -c "set mouse=n" -c "set autoread" -c "vsplit $task.out" -c "split $task.in" -c "wincmd l" -c "wincmd H" $task.c; fi'
2011-05-13 13:35:02
User: yolila
Functions: alias vi
-1

1. Get name of task by task=$(basename "$(pwd)")

2. Check whether "$task.c" exists as a file

3. open "$task.c", "$task.in", "task.out" in vim with such layout.

-------------------------------

|            | $task.in    |

|            |                |

|$task.c  |-----------------|

|            | $task.out  |

|            |                |

-------------------------------

vim `find . -iname '*.php'`
2011-05-11 01:19:28
User: wsams
Functions: vim
0

In this case, we'll be editing every PHP file from the current location down the tree.

You can show all the files in the vim buffer with :buffers which outputs something like,

:buffers

1 %a "./config/config.php" line 1

2 "./lib/ws-php-library.php" line 0

3 "./lib/css.php" line 0

4 "./lib/mysqldb.class.php" line 0

5 "./lib/config.class.php" line 0

6 "./lib/actions.php" line 0

Press ENTER or type command to continue

If you'd like to edit ./lib/mysqldb.class.php for example, enter :b4 anytime you're editing a file. You can switch back and forth.

:%s!^!foo!
find $DIR -name *.php -exec vim -u NONE -c 'set ft=php' -c 'set shiftwidth=4' -c 'set tabstop=4' -c 'set noexpandtab!' -c 'set noet' -c 'retab!' -c 'bufdo! "execute normal gg=G"' -c wq {} \;
2011-04-08 11:42:45
User: ruslan
Functions: find vim
-2

The sample command searches for PHP files replacing tabs with spaces.

-u NONE # don't use vimrc

Instead of

retab!

one may pass

retab! 4

for instance.

Look at this http://susepaste.org/69028693 also

vim -u NONE yourfile
2011-03-29 01:31:10
User: fossilet
Functions: vim
Tags: vim
2

This will skip all initializations. Especially useful when your ~/.vimrc has something wrong.

!!command
2011-03-04 22:34:22
Tags: vim
10

in command mode, navigate your cursor to the line where you want the command output to appear, and hit "!!". No need to enter edit mode or even type a ":" (colon).

alias vim="vim -p"
2010-12-30 22:53:33
User: tommed
Functions: alias
Tags: vim vi tab
10

I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

:ret
2010-12-13 05:03:10
User: light13
Tags: vim python
8

usage:

:[rang]ret[!][tabstop value]

python is indent sensitive, after command

:set list

you may see your codes are mixed with tab and space

ret can help you to convert space to tab or tab to space

Ctrl + [
2010-12-13 00:46:12
User: light13
Tags: vim
10

Faster and more convinent than [Esc]

:%!xxd
supportsWrap(){ ldd `which ${1}` | grep "libwrap" &>/dev/null && return 0 || return 1; }
2010-12-01 15:22:29
User: cicatriz
Functions: grep ldd return
Tags: vim Debian ldd
1

This function returns TRUE if the application supports tcp-wrapping or FALSE if not by reading the shared libraries used by this application.

au BufWritePost * if getline(1) =~ "^#!" | if getline(1) =~ "/bin/" | silent !chmod +x <afile> | endif | endif
2010-11-15 01:26:17
User: lifenotfound
Tags: vim vi chmod +x
19

Add this to .vimrc to automatically give scripts with a shebang (e.g., #!/usr/bin/perl) executable permissions when saving.

Found @ http://stackoverflow.com/questions/817060/creating-executable-files-in-linux/817522#817522

gqG
2010-11-08 04:05:24
User: atoponce
Tags: vim
2

This is assuming that you're editing some file that has not been wrapped at 80 columns, and you want it to be wrapped. While in Vim, enter ex mode, and set the textwidth to 80 columns:

:set textwidth=80

Then, press:

gg

to get to the top of the file, and:

gqG

to wrap every line from the top to the bottom of the file at 80 characters.

Of course, this will lose any indentation blocks you've setup if typing up some source code, or doing type setting. You can make modifications to this command as needed, as 'gq' is the formatting command you want, then you could send the formatting to a specific line in the file, rather than to the end of the file.

gq49G

Will apply the format from your current cursor location to the 49th row. And so on.

:exe getline(1)[1:] @%
:g/\n"/jo
2010-09-11 18:51:41
User: mensa13
-2

In case the line you want to join start with a char different than ", you may use \n.*"\n as regex.

vim ... :nmap <F5> :w^M:!python %<CR>
2010-09-03 18:44:21
User: duxklr
Functions: vim
Tags: vim python
1

This will save and execute your python script every time your press the F5 function key.

It can also be added to your .vimrc:

autocmd BufRead *.py nmap :w^M:!python %

NOTE: the ^M is not just caret-M, it can be created by type: ctrl-v ctrl-m

:exe "!wmctrl -r ".v:servername." -b toggle,fullscreen"
2010-09-03 14:42:35
User: carlitos77
Tags: vim gvim
1

Only under linux.

Requires Gvim compiled with "clientserver" functionality and

wmctrl command installed on system.

Instead of servername can be used the current edited file name.

Put it in a function and map it for get rid of "Press a key" after execution.

:%s/\([^\"]\)\(\n\)/\1 /g
2010-09-03 11:03:49
User: godzillante
1

----

this line ends here

but must be concatenated with this one

"this line ends here"

and should NOT be concatenated with this one

vi2() {for i in $@; do [ -f "$i" ] && [ ! -w "$i" ] && sudo vim $@ && return; done; vim $@}
2010-08-15 10:00:14
User: pipeliner
Functions: sudo vim
Tags: vim sudo
-3

Like the http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/6327/open-file-with-sudo-when-there-is-no-write-permission, but works (in zsh; my commandlinefu is not strong enough to understand why bash don't like it) with vim options, like -O, and many input files.

There could be other mistakes.

if test -w $1; then vim $1; else sudo vim $1; fi
2010-08-14 13:28:32
User: srepmub
Functions: sudo test vim
Tags: vim sudo tee
-2

this avoids several VIM warnings, which I seem too stupid to disable: warning, readonly! and: file and buffer have changed, reload?!

:set ff=unix
2010-07-23 20:17:23
User: Matejunkie
Tags: vim ^M
10

And in case you want to migrate back to, err.. MS-DOS: ":set ff=dos" does the opposite.

:%d
%s/?/\&iuml;/ge | %s/?/\&#0233;/ge | %s/?/"/ge | %s/?/"/ge | %s/?/'/ge | %s/?/'/ge | %s/?/\&ecirc;/ge | %s/?/\&#0133;/ge | %s/?/\&#232;/ge | %s/?/\&#243;/ge | %s/?/\&ouml;/ge | %s/?/\&#0233;/ge | %s/?/\&ndash;/ge | %s/?/\&mdash;/ge
2010-07-15 07:40:45
User: miccaman
Tags: vim
-1

a brief list of very common special characters in Dutch. Usefull for formatting Word source to html.