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Commands tagged vim from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged vim - 141 results
%s/?/\ï/ge | %s/?/\é/ge | %s/?/"/ge | %s/?/"/ge | %s/?/'/ge | %s/?/'/ge | %s/?/\ê/ge | %s/?/\…/ge | %s/?/\è/ge | %s/?/\ó/ge | %s/?/\ö/ge | %s/?/\é/ge | %s/?/\–/ge | %s/?/\—/ge
2010-07-15 07:40:45
User: miccaman
Tags: vim
-1

a brief list of very common special characters in Dutch. Usefull for formatting Word source to html.

vim --version | grep -P '^(\+|\-)' | sed 's/\s/\n/g' | grep -Pv '^ ?$'
2010-07-02 02:57:19
User: evaryont
Functions: grep sed vim
Tags: vim sed grep
2

The above output is for a custom compiled version of Vim on Arch Linux.

Just a quick shell one liner, and presents a list of all the enabled and disabled (those prefixed with a '-') features.

vimlint(){ eval $(xmllint --noout "$1" 2>&1 | awk -F: '/parser error/{print "vim \""$1"\" +"$2; exit}'); }
2010-06-23 15:55:02
User: putnamhill
Functions: awk eval
1

Validate a file using xmllint. If there are parser errors, edit the file in vim at the line of the first error.

vix(){ vim +'w | set ar | silent exe "!chmod +x %" | redraw!' $@; }
2010-05-27 21:12:48
User: dooblem
Functions: ar set vim
Tags: vim vi chmod
2
vix /tmp/script.sh

Open a file directly with execution permission.

Put the function in your .bashrc

You can also put this in your vimrc:

command XX w | set ar | silent exe "!chmod +x %" | redraw!

and open a new file like this:

vi +XX /tmp/script.sh
:w !curl -F "sprunge=<-" http://sprunge.us | xclip
2010-04-25 00:43:37
User: shawnjgoff
Tags: vim vi share
15

Sprunge.us is a code/text sharing site like pastebin, but it is easy to post stuff from the command line.

How it works:

:w !command

In vim, w writes the current tab to a file when a filename is given afterwards, but if !command is given, the output is piped to the stdin of command.

curl -F "sprunge=<-" http://sprunge.us

curl is an HTTP client. The -F option does an HTTP post to the given address. The data in the quotes is passed in the post. The "sprunge=" part sets up a fieldname - the part that follows is what is associated with the name. The "<" tells curl to send data from the file descriptor that follows it. The "-" in bash is a file descriptor that points to stdin instead of an actual file; in this case, stdin is being piped in from vim. After we send the HTTP post to sprunge.us, it will give back a url that points to the data you just sent.

| xclip

xclip is a utility that lets you put stuff in your clipboard or selection buffer. This part uses a bash pipe ( | ) to redirect the stdout of the previous command to the stdin of the next command. So, we're capturing the URL that curl gave us and putting it into the selection buffer, ready to paste into IRC or a forum.

Notes:

Of course, for this to work, you must have curl (which comes by default on most distroes), and xclip installed.

When you share the url, you can append "?lang" to highlight and have line numbers. Check out http://sprunge.us/BZXV?log for line numbers and http://sprunge.us/BZXV?ruby for highlighting.

If you prefer to use ctrl-v (paste from clipboard) instead of middle-click (paste from selection buffer), look up options on xclip - you can do that.

vi +/pattern [file]
2010-04-24 22:15:12
User: punkwalrus
Functions: vi
Tags: vim edit vi
25

Open up vi or vim at the first instance of a pattern in [file]. Useful if you know where you want to be, like "PermitRootLogin" in sshd_config. Also, vi +10 [file] will open up a file at line 10. VERY useful when you get "error at line 10" type of output.

X='pattern'; vim +/"$X" `egrep -lr "$X" *`
vim -r 2>&1 | grep '\.sw.' -A 5 | grep 'still running' -B 5
2010-04-17 19:43:35
User: rkulla
Functions: grep vim
3

Catches .swp, .swo, .swn, etc.

If you have access to lsof, it'll give you more compressed output and show you the associated terminals (e.g., pts/5, which you could then use 'w' to figure out where it's originating from): lsof | grep '\.sw.$'

If you have swp files turned off, you can do something like: ps x | grep '[g,v]im', but it won't tell you about files open in buffers, via :e [file].

vim -p file1 file2 [...]
vim -o file1 file2...
2010-04-13 22:09:47
User: rkulla
Functions: vim
Tags: vim split
7

-o acts like :spit. Use -O (capital o) for side-by-side like :vsplit. Use vim -d or vimdiff if you need a diff(1) comparison.

To split gnu Screen instead of vim, use ^A S for horizontal, ^A | for vertical.

vim $(find . ! -path \*.svn\* -type f -iname \*foo\*)
2010-04-11 23:32:41
User: rkulla
Functions: find vim
Tags: vim find
2

This command searches the current directory, and all of its subdirs, for files that have the string "foo" in their filename (foo.c, two-foo.txt, index-FOO-bar.php, etc), and opens them in Vim. It ignores any hidden .svn directories. Change -iname to -name if you want to do case-sensitive matches.

Files open in buffers by default, so to verify that the correct files were opened, type ":list". You can load all the files in tabs by doing ":tab ball" or use 'vim -p' on the command-line to load files straight to tabs.

If you get permission denied errors, do: vim $(find . ! -path \*.svn\* -type -f iname \*foo\* 2>/dev/null)

To narrow it down to a single file extension, such as .php files, use \*foo\*.php (or '*foo*.php'. Which ever you prefer)

:%y *
2010-04-03 14:20:01
User: chmduquesne
Tags: vim
8

(only when vim has been compiled with +clipboard)

!xclip -i %
2010-04-03 03:43:12
User: Legion
Tags: vim xclip mouse
0

Allows to copy the file contents to X clipboard, and then be pasted in any application with the middle mouse button.

:w !sudo tee > /dev/null %
2010-03-24 20:04:26
User: idemal
Functions: tee
Tags: vim sudo tee
24

Write a file you edited in Vim but that you do not have the permissions to write to (unless you use sudo.) Same as #1204 but without the echo to stdout that I find annoying.

:/\c{pattern}
:g/^$/d
alias busy='my_file=$(find /usr/include -type f | sort -R | head -n 1); my_len=$(wc -l $my_file | awk "{print $1}"); let "r = $RANDOM % $my_len" 2>/dev/null; vim +$r $my_file'
2010-03-09 21:48:41
User: busybee
Functions: alias awk find head sort vim wc
22

This makes an alias for a command named 'busy'. The 'busy' command opens a random file in /usr/include to a random line with vim. Drop this in your .bash_aliases and make sure that file is initialized in your .bashrc.

find ./ -name '*.sw[op]' -delete
find . -name "*~" -exec rm {} \;
2010-02-26 10:54:02
User: ivanatora
Functions: find rm
Tags: vim find
-5

Assuming only VIM has *~ files in your current dir. If you have usefull data in a file named in the *~ pattern, DO NOT RUN this command!

vimdiff scp://root@server-foo.com//etc/snmp/snmpd.conf scp://root@server-bar.com//etc/snmp/snmpd.conf
2010-01-06 18:12:45
User: sputnick
Tags: vim remote scp
17

You can use

vim scp://root@example.com//file

too in a simple case.

Create aliases for common vim minibuffer/cmd typos
2009-12-28 20:58:29
User: tmsh
Functions: vim
Tags: vim
1

Because entering ':' requires that you press shift, sometimes common command-line / mini-buffer commands will be capitalized by accident.

vim -n -es -c 'g/# CommandParse/+2,/^\s\+esac/-1 d p | % d | put p | %<' -c 'g/^\([-+]\+[^)]\+\))/,/^\(\s\+[^- \t#]\|^$\)/-1 p' -c 'q!' $0
2009-12-19 08:32:00
User: syladmin
Functions: vim
0

A really fun vim oneliner for auto documenting your option's parsing in your script.

# print the text embeded in the case that parse options from command line.

# the block is matched with the marker 'CommandParse' in comment, until 'esac'

extract_cmdl_options()

{

# use vim for parsing:

# 1st grep the case block and copy in register @p + unindent in the buffer of the file itself

# 2nd filter lines which start with --opt or +opt and keep comment on hte following lines until an empty line

# 3rd discard changes in the buffer and quit

vim -n -es -c 'g/# CommandParse/+2,/^\s\+esac/-1 d p | % d | put p | %

-c 'g/^\([-+]\+[^)]\+\))/,/^\(\s\+[^- \t#]\|^$\)/-1 p' \

-c 'q!' $0

}

example code:http://snipplr.com/view/25059/display-embeded-comments-for-every-opt-usefull-for-auto-documenting-your-script/

alias :q='tput setaf 1; echo >&2 "this is NOT vi(m) :/"; tput sgr0'
2009-12-08 12:59:44
User: sputnick
Functions: alias echo tput
Tags: vim alias vi tput
-1

For vi(m) users :

Add it in your ~/.bashrc

Add an "exit" @ the end if you are masochist ;)

alias ':q'='exit'
2009-09-05 17:59:50
User: tobiasboon
Functions: alias
Tags: vim alias exit :q
9

Put this in your ~/.bashrc file (or the equivalent)

If you use vim a lot, this alias will be immediately obvious. Your brain will thank you.

<ctrl-f> in ex mode in vim
2009-09-05 14:43:15
User: Vereb
Functions: ex
Tags: vim
4

If you are in ex mode in vim i.e. you've pressed ':'. You can edit the current command by pressing <ctrl-f>