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Commands tagged tr from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged tr - 66 results
tr '\000' '\377' < /dev/zero | dd of=allones bs=1024 count=2k
2009-12-08 16:05:28
User: azeey
Functions: dd tr
Tags: dd tr
4

This is similar to how you would generate a file with all zeros

dd if=/dev/zero of=allzeros bs=1024 count=2k
tr -c -d 0-9 < /dev/urandom | head -c 10
tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]' <"$1"
2009-10-08 11:34:07
User: opexxx
Functions: tr
Tags: tr
6

Transforms a file to all uppercase.

type <filename>
2009-09-14 09:37:23
User: danam
Functions: type
4

Also searches for aliases and shell builtins

which <filename>
for L in `echo :$PATH | tr : '\n'`; do F=${L:-"."}/fileName; if [ -f ${F} -o -h ${F} ]; then echo ${F}; break; fi; done
2009-09-11 16:14:36
User: arcege
Functions: echo tr
-1

Searches in order of the directories of $PATH. Stops after finding the entry; looks for only that fileName. Works in Bourne, Korn, Bash and Z shells.

echo $PATH | tr \: \\n
2009-09-09 02:10:04
User: crk
Functions: echo tr
Tags: bash echo tr PATH
12

This version uses Pipes, but is easier for the common user to grasp... instead of using sed or some other more complicated method, it uses the tr command

dos2unix file.txt
dd if=/dev/urandom count=200 bs=1 2>/dev/null | tr "\n" " " | sed 's/[^a-zA-Z0-9]//g' | cut -c-16
infile=$1 for i in $(cat $infile) do echo $i | tr "," "\n" | sort -n | tr "\n" "," | sed "s/,$//" echo done
2009-07-12 21:23:37
User: iframe
Functions: cat echo sed sort tr
Tags: cat bash sort sed tr
0

Save the script as: sort_file

Usage: sort_file < sort_me.csv > out_file.csv

This script was originally posted by Admiral Beotch in LinuxQuestions.org on the Linux-Software forum.

I modified this script to make it more portable.

< <infile> tr ' \t' '\n' | tr -s '\n' > <outfile>
2009-07-07 01:17:47
User: qubyte
Functions: tr
Tags: shell tr
-1

Puts words on new lines, removing additional newlines.

echo "${STRING}" | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]' | awk '{print toupper(substr($0,1,1))substr($0,2);}'
2009-06-23 21:11:34
User: mohan43u
Functions: awk echo tr
Tags: awk tr
0

Helpful when we want to do mass file renaming(especially mp3s).

(Command too long..See sample Output..)
2009-06-14 20:34:37
User: mohan43u
Tags: bash sed echo tr od
-3

curl doesn't provide url-encoding for 'GET' data, it have an option '--data-urlencode', but its only for 'POST' data. Thats why I need to write down this commandline. With 'perl', 'php' and 'python', this is one liner, but just I wrote it for fun. Works in Ubuntu, will work in all linux varients(I hope it will work in unix varients also).

find `echo "${PATH}" | tr ':' ' '` -type f | while read COMMAND; do man -f "${COMMAND##*/}"; done
2009-06-13 19:56:24
User: mohan43u
Functions: find man read tr
Tags: man find read while tr
3

Obviously, you can replace 'man' command with any command in this command line to do useful things. I just want to mention that there is a way to list all the commands which you can execute directly without giving fullpath.

Normally all important commands will be placed in your PATH directories. This commandline uses that variable to get commands. Works in Ubuntu, will work in all 'manpage' configured *nix systems.

wget -q -O- http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/cprfd10.txt | sed '1,419d' | tr "\n" " " | tr " " "\n" | perl -lpe 's/\W//g;$_=lc($_)' | grep "^[a-z]" | awk 'length > 1' | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2"\t"$1}'
2009-05-04 16:00:39
User: alperyilmaz
Functions: awk grep perl sed sort tr uniq wget
-4

This command might not be useful for most of us, I just wanted to share it to show power of command line.

Download simple text version of novel David Copperfield from Poject Gutenberg and then generate a single column of words after which occurences of each word is counted by sort | uniq -c combination.

This command removes numbers and single characters from count. I'm sure you can write a shorter version.

dpkg-query -l| grep -v "ii " | grep "rc " | awk '{print $2" "}' | tr -d "\n" | xargs aptitude purge -y
2009-04-28 19:25:53
User: thepicard
Functions: awk grep tr xargs
-3

This will, for an application that has already been removed but had its configuration left behind, purge that configuration from the system. To test it out first, you can remove the last -y, and it will show you what it will purge without actually doing it. I mean it never hurts to check first, "just in case." ;)