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Commands tagged screen from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged screen - 35 results
AUTOSSH_POLL=1 autossh -M 21010 hostname -t 'screen -Dr'
2009-10-11 06:04:29
Functions: hostname
10

Only useful for really flakey connections (but im stuck with one for now). Though if youre in this situation ive found this to be a good way to run autossh and it does a pretty good job of detecting when the session is down and restarting. Combined with the -t and screen commands this pops you back into your working session lickety split w/ as few headaches as possible.

And if autossh is a bit slow at detecting the downed ssh connection, just run this in another tab/terminal window to notify autossh that it should drop it and start over. Basically for when polling is too slow.

kill -SIGUSR1 `pgrep autossh`

[[ "$WINDOW" ]] && PS1="\u@\h:\w[$WINDOW]\$ "
2009-07-23 06:46:19
User: recursiverse
Tags: bash screen shell
4

Add this to your $HOME/.bashrc file. It will only set this prompt if it is running inside screen ($WINDOW var is set)

Looks like this...

ion@atomos:~[2]$
ssh -t remote_host screen -r
2009-07-23 06:15:04
User: recursiverse
Functions: screen ssh
Tags: ssh screen
41

Directly attach a remote screen session (saves a useless parent bash process)

screen -d -m nautilus --no-desktop `pwd`
2009-05-07 00:49:07
User: windsurfer
Functions: screen
-10

This opens up nautilus in the current directory, which is useful for some quick file management that isn't efficiently done from a terminal.

echo "screen -DR" >> ~/.bash_profile
2009-04-28 20:45:37
User: sud0er
Functions: echo
Tags: screen
11

From screen's manpage: "Attach here and now. In detail this means: If a session is running, then reattach. If necessary detach and logout remotely first. If it was not running create it and notify the user. This is the author's favorite."

Toss this in your ~/.bash_profile so that you never have that "oh crap" moment where you wanted to run something in screen and didn't.

screen -d -m [<command>]
2009-04-28 12:35:25
User: cammarin
Functions: screen
Tags: screen
16

Start screen in detached mode, i.e., already running on background. The command is optional, but what is the purpose on start a blank screen process that way?

It's useful when invoking from a script (I manage to run many wget downloads in parallel, for example).

for i in `screen -ls | perl -ne'if(/^\s+\d+\.([^\s]+)/){print $1, " "}'`; do gnome-terminal -e "screen -x $i"; done
2009-04-25 22:39:24
User: hank
Functions: perl
Tags: screen Linux perl
2

There was another line that was dependent on having un-named screen sessions. This just wouldn't do. This one works no matter what the name is. A possible improvement would be removing the perl dependence, but that doesn't effect me.

% screen -r someuser/
2009-03-25 23:59:38
User: totoro
Functions: screen
38

If you enable multiuser, then you can permit others to share your screen session. The following conditions apply:

1. screen must be suid root;

2. "multiuser on" must be configured in ~/.screenrc;

3. control the others user(s) access with "aclchg":

# ----- from ~/.screenrc-users -----

aclchg someuser +rx "#?" #enable r/o access to "someuser"

aclchg someuser -x "#,at,aclchg,acladd,acldel,quit" # don't allow these

aclchg otheruser +rwx "#?" # enable r/w access to "otheruser"

aclchg otheruser -x "#,at,aclchg,acladd,acldel,quit" # don't allow them to use these commands

# -----

After doing this (once), you start your session with:

$ screen

Then, the other user can join your terminal session(s) with youruserid:

$ screen -r youruserid/

Note: the trailing "/" is required.

Multiple users can share the same screen simultaneously, each with independent access controlled precisely with "aclchg" in the ~/.screenrc file.

I use the following setup:

# ~/.screenrc-base

# default screenrc on any host

source $HOME/.screenrc-base

source $HOME/.screenrc-$HOST

source $HOME/.screenrc-users

# -----

Then, the base configurations are in ~/.screenrc-base; the host-specific configurations are in ~/.screenrc-$HOST, and the user configurations are in ~/.screenrc-users.

The host-specific .screenrc file might contain some host-specific screen commands; e.g.:

# ~/.screen-myhost

# -----

screen -t 'anywhere' /bin/tcsh

screen -t 'anywhere1' /bin/tcsh

# ----

The .screenrc-base contains:

# ~/.screenrc-base

## I find typing ^a (Control-a) awkward. So I set the escape key to CTRL-j instead of a.

escape ^Jj

termcapinfo xterm* ti@:te@:

autodetach on

zombie kr

verbose on

multiuser on

dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg
^A ?
2009-02-25 23:42:33
User: raphink
Tags: screen
19

Displays a list of all the basic keyboard shortcuts in screen.