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Commands tagged Linux from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged Linux - 236 results
net rpc -I ADDRESS -U USERNAME%PASSWORD service {stop|start} SVCNAME
2010-06-29 17:12:36
User: f0rk
4

Control (stop, start, restart) a Windows Service from a Linux machine which has the `net` command (provided by samba).

tar -czf ../header.tar.gz $(find . -name *.h)
2010-06-27 23:44:48
Functions: find tar
Tags: Linux tar
1

This is a shortcut to tar up all files matching a wildcard. Tar doesn't have the --include (apparently).

aptitude remove ?and(~i~nlinux-(im|he) ?not(~n`uname -r`))
2010-06-11 22:57:09
User: dbbolton
2

A little aptitude magic. Note: this will remove images AND headers. If you just want to remove images: aptitude remove ?and(~i~nlinux-im ?not(~n`uname -r`))

I used this in zsh without any problems. I'm not sure how other shells will interpret some of the special characters used in the aptitude search terms. Use -s to simulate.

aptitude purge linux-image | grep ^i | grep -v $(uname -r)
perl -e 'chomp($k=`uname -r`); for (</boot/vm*>) {s/^.*vmlinuz-($k)?//; $l.="linux-image-$_ ";} system "aptitude remove $l";'
aptitude remove $(dpkg -l|egrep '^ii linux-(im|he)'|awk '{print $2}'|grep -v `uname -r`)
2010-06-10 21:23:00
User: dbbolton
Functions: awk egrep grep
8

This should do the same thing and is about 70 chars shorter.

while inotifywait -r -e MODIFY dir/; do make; done;
while true; do inotifywait -r -e MODIFY dir/ && make; done;
2010-06-04 17:07:03
User: fain182
15

Uses inotifywait from inotify-tools ( http://wiki.github.com/rvoicilas/inotify-tools/ ), that is compatible only with linux.

Usefull when you work with files that have to be compiled.. latex, haml, c..

cowsay `fortune` | toilet --metal -f term
2010-06-03 21:48:54
-6

Get colorful fortunes dictated by an ASCII cow. For full enjoyment you'll need to have color setup enabled for your terminal.

alias a=" killall rapidly_spawning_process"; a; a; a;
2010-05-20 02:33:28
User: raj77_in
Functions: alias
Tags: Linux unix kill
3

if you dont want to alias also then you can do

killall rapidly_spawning_process ; !! ; !! ; !!

killall rapidly_spawning_process ; killall rapidly_spawning_process ; killall rapidly_spawning_process
2010-05-20 00:26:10
Functions: killall
Tags: Linux unix kill
-2

Use this if you can't type repeated killall commands fast enough to kill rapidly spawning processes.

If a process keeps spawning copies of itself too rapidly, it can do so faster than a single killall can catch them and kill them. Retyping the command at the prompt can be too slow too, even with command history retrieval.

Chaining a few killalls on single command line can start up the next killall more quickly. The first killall will get most of the processes, except for some that were starting up in the meanwhile, the second will get most of the rest, and the third mops up.

utime(){ python -c "import time; print(time.strftime('%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y', time.localtime($1)))"; }
utime(){ awk -v d=$1 'BEGIN{print strftime("%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y", d)}'; }
utime(){ date -d "1970-01-01 GMT $1 seconds"; }
utime { date -d @$1; }
2010-05-12 12:21:15
User: deltaray
Functions: date
4

More recent versions of the date command finally have the ability to decode the unix epoch time into a human readable date. This function makes it simple to utilize this feature quickly.

find /tmp -type f -atime +1 -delete
2010-05-11 17:08:49
User: mattoufoutu
Functions: find
5

Cleans all files in /tmp that have been accessed at least 2 days ago.

(for i in `find . -maxdepth 2 -name .svn | sed 's/.svn$//'`; do echo $i; svn info $i; done ) | egrep '^.\/|^URL'
2010-05-09 11:54:37
User: jespere
Functions: echo egrep info sed
0

If you have lots of subversion working copies in one directory and want to see in which repositories they are stored, this will do the trick. Can be convenient if you need to move to a new subversion server.

tr -d "\n\r" | grep -ioEm1 "<title[^>]*>[^<]*</title" | cut -f2 -d\> | cut -f1 -d\<
awk 'BEGIN{IGNORECASE=1;FS="<title>|</title>";RS=EOF} {print $2}' | sed '/^$/d' > file.html
2010-04-20 13:27:47
User: tamouse
Functions: awk sed
Tags: Linux awk html
1

previous version leaves lots of blank lines

awk 'BEGIN{IGNORECASE=1;FS="<title>|</title>";RS=EOF} {print $2}' file.html
2010-04-20 10:54:03
User: sata
Functions: awk
Tags: Linux awk html
4

Case Insensitive! and Works even if the "<title>...</title>" spans over multiple line.

Simple! :-)

cat file1 ... fileN > combinedFile;
2010-04-17 01:00:04
User: GinoMan2440
Functions: cat
Tags: cat bash Linux
-4

the last person who posted used the most roundabout way to concatinate files, there's a reason there's a "conCATinate" command... Using this method, you also get to choose the order of the files, below another person just did *.txt > combined.txt which is fine but the order depends on the implementation of "cat" which is probably alphabetical order of filenames.

cat *.txt >output.txt
perl -i -pe 's/\r/\n/g' file
ls | grep *.txt | while read file; do cat $file >> ./output.txt; done;
wget randomfunfacts.com -O - 2>/dev/null | grep \<strong\> | sed "s;^.*<i>\(.*\)</i>.*$;\1;" | while read FUNFACT; do notify-send -t $((1000+300*`echo -n $FUNFACT | wc -w`)) -i gtk-dialog-info "RandomFunFact" "$FUNFACT"; done
2010-04-02 09:43:32
User: mtron
Functions: grep read sed wc wget
2

extension to tali713's random fact generator. It takes the output & sends it to notify-osd. Display time is proportional to the lengh of the fact.