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Commands tagged ps from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged ps - 50 results
ps -o user,%cpu,%mem,command
2010-12-08 10:35:25
Functions: ps
Tags: ps
0

Using ps options rather than filtering.

cd /proc&&ps a -opid=|xargs -I+ sh -c '[[ $PPID -ne + ]]&&echo -e "\n[+]"&&tr -s "\000" " "<+/cmdline&&echo&&tr -s "\000\033" "\nE"<+/environ|sort'
1

Grabs the cmdline used to execute the process, and the environment that the process is being run under. This is much different than the 'env' command, which only lists the environment for the shell. This is very useful (to me at least) to debug various processes on my server. For example, this lets me see the environment that my apache, mysqld, bind, and other server processes have.

Here's a function I use:

aa_ps_all () { ( cd /proc && command ps -A -opid= | xargs -I'{}' sh -c 'test $PPID -ne {}&&test -r {}/cmdline&&echo -e "\n[{}]"&&tr -s "\000" " "<{}/cmdline&&echo&&tr -s "\000\033" "\nE"<{}/environ|sort&&cat {}/limits' ); }

From my .bash_profile at http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

for p in `ps L|cut -d' ' -f1`;do echo -e "`tput clear;read -p$p -n1 p`";ps wwo pid:6,user:8,comm:10,$p kpid -A;done
2

While going through the source code for the well known ps command, I read about some interesting things.. Namely, that there are a bunch of different fields that ps can try and enumerate for you. These are fields I was not able to find in the man pages, documentation, only in the source.

Here is a longer function that goes through each of the formats recognized by the ps on your machine, executes it, and then prompts you whether you would like to add it or not. Adding it simply adds it to an array that is then printed when you ctrl-c or at the end of the function run. This lets you save your favorite ones and then see the command to put in your .bash_profile like mine at : http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Note that I had to do the exec method below in order to pause with read.

t ()

{

local r l a P f=/tmp/ps c='command ps wwo pid:6,user:8,vsize:8,comm:20' IFS=' ';

trap 'exec 66

exec 66 $f && command ps L | tr -s ' ' >&$f;

while read -u66 l >&/dev/null; do

a=${l/% */};

$c,$a k -${a//%/} -A;

yn "Add $a" && P[$SECONDS]=$a;

done

}

pgrep -c cat
ps -axgu | cut -f1 -d' ' | sort -u
ps -eo user | sort -u
2010-07-07 12:28:44
User: dfaulkner
Functions: ps sort
2

Shows a list of users that currently running processes are executing as.

YMMV regarding ps and it's many variants. For example, you might need:

ps -axgu | cut -f1 -d' ' | sort -u
pkill -f <process name>
2010-06-19 02:36:31
User: eikenberry
Tags: kill ps killall
0

Using -f treats the process name as a pattern so you don't have to include the full path in the command. Thus 'pkill -f firefox' works, even with iceweasel.

wait $!
2010-06-07 21:56:36
User: noahspurrier
Functions: wait
2

Referring to the original post, if you are using $! then that means the process is a child of the current shell, so you can just use `wait $!`. If you are trying to wait for a process created outside of the current shell, then the loop on `kill -0 $PID` is good; although, you can't get the exit status of the process.

pgrep -cu ioggstream
command ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -vsz -A|sed -u '/^ *PID/d;10q'
2

I've wanted this for a long time, finally just sat down and came up with it. This shows you the sorted output of ps in a pretty format perfect for cron or startup scripts. You can sort by changing the k -vsz to k -pmem for example to sort by memory instead.

If you want a function, here's one from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

aa_top_ps(){ local T N=${1:-10};T=${2:-vsz}; ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -${T} -A|sed -u "/^ *PID/d;${N}q"; }
ps hax -o user | sort | uniq -c
ps aux |awk '{$1} {++P[$1]} END {for(a in P) if (a !="USER") print a,P[a]}'
2010-04-28 15:25:18
User: benyounes
Functions: awk ps
5

enumerates the number of processes for each user.

ps BSD format is used here , for standard Unix format use : ps -eLf |awk '{$1} {++P[$1]} END {for(a in P) if (a !="UID") print a,P[a]}'

hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; }
2010-04-07 08:45:26
User: AskApache
Functions: sed
-2
hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; }

hb blinks, hc does a reverse color with background.. both very nice.

hc(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 0;tput setab 6`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; }

Run this:

command ps -Hacl -F S -A f | hc ".*$PPID.*" | hb ".*$$.*"

Your welcome ;)

From my bash profile - http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

ps uH p <PID_OF_U_PROCESS> | wc -l
2010-03-23 15:05:27
User: mrbyte
Functions: ps wc
Tags: java ps
1

if you have problem threads problem in tomcat

pgrep <name>
2010-02-28 22:59:33
User: alesplin
Tags: grep ps
-2

You'll need to install proctools. MacPorts and Fink have this if you're running Mac OS X, check your Linux distribution's repositories if it isn't installed by default.

psgrep() { if [ ! -z $1 ] ; then echo "Grepping for processes matching $1..." ps aux | grep -i $1 | grep -v grep else echo "!! Need name to grep for" fi }
2010-02-27 13:47:28
User: evenme
Functions: echo grep ps
Tags: grep ps
-4

Grep for a named process.

wait
2010-01-15 04:03:11
User: bhepple
Functions: wait
0

If you really _must_ use a loop, this is better than parsing the output of 'ps':

PID=$! ;while kill -0 $PID &>/dev/null; do sleep 1; done

kill -0 $PID returns 0 if the process still exists; otherwise 1

while (ps -ef | grep [r]unning_program_name); do sleep 10; done; command_to_execute
2010-01-14 16:26:34
User: m_a_xim
Functions: grep ps sleep
-2

The '[r]' is to avoid grep from grepping itself. (interchange 'r' by the appropriate letter)

Here is an example that I use a lot (as root or halt will not work):

while (ps -ef | grep [w]get); do sleep 10; done; sleep 60; halt

I add the 'sleep 60' command just in case something went wrong; so that I have time to cancel.

Very useful if you are going to bed while downloading something and do not want your computer running all night.

psu(){ command ps -Hcl -F S f -u ${1:-$USER}; }
2009-11-13 06:10:33
User: AskApache
Functions: command ps
4

An easy function to get a process tree listing (very detailed) for all the processes of any gived user.

This function is also in my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

ps aux --sort=%mem,%cpu
2009-10-10 22:48:51
User: mrwill
Functions: ps
13

you can also pipe it to "tail" command to show 10 most memory using processes.

ps -u<user>
pstree -p
1

Shows a less detailed output, made only of the process tree and their pids.

command ps -Hacl -F S -A f
2009-08-19 07:08:19
User: AskApache
Functions: command ps
8

I don't truly enjoy many commands more than this one, which I alias to be ps1.. Cool to be able to see the heirarchy and makes it clearer what need to be killed, and whats really going on.

watch "ps auxw | grep [d]efunct"
2009-08-12 08:11:16
User: alvinx
Functions: watch
6

to omit "grep -v", put some brackets around a single character

watch "ps auxw | grep 'defunct' | grep -v 'grep' | grep -v 'watch'"
2009-08-11 12:22:13
Functions: watch
5

Shows all those processes; useful when building some massively forking script that could lead to zombies when you don't have your waitpid()'s done just right.