Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Universal configuration monitoring and system of record for IT.
Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!
Hide

Top Tags

Hide

Functions

Hide

Credits

Commands tagged disk usage from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged disk usage - 38 results
du -kd | egrep -v "/.*/" | sort -n
2010-03-30 15:40:35
User: rmbjr60
Functions: du egrep sort
-1

Thanks for the submit! My alternative produces summaries only for directories. The original post additionally lists all files in the current directory. Sometimes the files, they just clutter up the output. Once the big directory is located, *then* worry about which file(s) are consuming so much space.

alias dush="du -sm *|sort -n|tail"
2010-03-26 10:18:57
User: funky
Functions: alias
28

sorts the files by integer megabytes, which should be enough to (interactively) find the space wasters. Now you can

dush

for the above output,

dush -n 3

for only the 3 biggest files and so on. It's always a good idea to have this line in your .profile or .bashrc

du -hs *|grep M|sort -n
2010-03-25 19:20:24
User: tuxlifan
Functions: du grep sort
3

This is easy to type if you are looking for a few (hundred) "missing" megabytes (and don't mind the occasional K slipping in)...

A variation without false positives and also finding gigabytes (but - depending on your keyboard setup - more painful to type):

du -hs *|grep -P '^(\d|,)+(M|G)'|sort -n

(NOTE: you might want to replace the ',' according to your locale!)

Don't forget that you can

modify the globbing as needed! (e.g. '.[^\.]* *' to include hidden files and directories (w/ bash))

in its core similar to:

http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/706/show-sorted-list-of-files-with-sizes-more-than-1mb-in-the-current-dir

find . -name <pattern> -ls | awk 'BEGIN {i=0}; {i=i+$7}; END {print i}'
2010-02-05 14:47:27
User: danam
Functions: awk find
Tags: disk usage
2

Just how much space are those zillions of database logs taking up ? How much will you gain on a compression rate of say 80% ? This little line gives you a good start for your calculations.

sudo du -ks $(ls -d */) | sort -nr | cut -f2 | xargs -d '\n' du -sh 2> /dev/null
2009-08-17 22:21:09
User: Code_Bleu
Functions: cut du ls sort sudo xargs
Tags: disk usage
7

This allows the output to be sorted from largest to smallest in human readable format.

du -hd 1
2009-08-10 13:11:22
User: Tuirgin
Functions: du
Tags: disk usage osx
3

OSX's BSD version of the du command uses the -d argument instead of --max-depth.

du --max-depth=1
sudo du -sh $(ls -d */) 2> /dev/null
du -aB1m|awk '$1 >= 100'
ncdu directory_name
2009-06-09 00:02:48
User: bwoodacre
4

ncdu is a text-mode ncurses-based disk usage analyzer. Useful for when you want to see where all your space is going. For a single flat directory it isn't more elaborate than an du|sort or some such thing, but this analyzes all directories below the one you specify so space consumed by files inside subdirectories is taken into account. This way you get the full picture. Features: file deletion, file size or size on disk and refresh as contents change. Homepage: http://dev.yorhel.nl/ncdu

sudo shred -zn10 /dev/sda
2009-04-30 13:02:43
User: dcabanis
Functions: shred sudo
-2

Shred can be used to shred a given partition or an complete disk. This should insure that not data is left on your disk

du -cs * .[^\.]* | sort -n
2009-03-02 18:43:48
User: cemsbr
Functions: du sort
9

Very useful when you need disk space. It calculates the disk usage of all files and dirs (descending them) located at the current directory (including hidden ones). Then sort puts them in order.