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Commands using alias from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using alias - 203 results
alias onlyx='nohup startx & disown ; exit'
2010-07-26 12:44:13
User: elementa13
Functions: alias
Tags: X console tty
1

There are different ways to run X, I prefer to run it without xdm/gdm. The problem is you can't lock X because one can press Ctrl+Alt+F1, press Ctrl+Z and kill you X locking process. Of course you can disable Ctrl+Alt* or Ctrl+Alt+Backspace keys, but it's inconvinient if you really need to switch into console.

alias ltmux="if tmux has; then tmux attach; else tmux new; fi"
2010-07-19 01:27:47
Functions: alias
Tags: bash alias sh tmux
2

If a tmux session is already running attach it, otherwise create a new one. Useful if you often forget about running tmuxes (or just don't care)

alias dush="du -xsm * | sort -n | awk '{ printf(\"%4s MB ./\",\$1) ; for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) { if (i>1) printf(\"%s \",\$i) } ; printf(\"\n\") }' | tail"
2010-07-15 10:38:27
User: dopeman
Functions: alias
-1

Essentially the same as funky's alias, but will not traverse filesystems and has nicer formatting.

__disown(){ local cmd=$1 ; shift ; $cmd "$@" &> /dev/null &disown }; for i in gvim ; do alias $i="__disown $i"; done
2010-07-07 20:46:45
User: smolav
Functions: alias shift
Tags: bash function
0

Define commands that you always invoke with an appended '&disown'. In the example:

gvim foo.txt

will open gvim dettached from the current terminal.

alias histdel='history -d $((HISTCMD-2)) && history -d $((HISTCMD-1))'
2010-07-02 00:20:44
Functions: alias
0

I rarely need this, but I have a hard time remembering the command when I need it.

Admit it. This has happened to you. Yes this is bad, and you better clean up now.

Borrowed from http://thoughtsbyclayg.blogspot.com/2008/02/how-to-delete-last-command-from-bash.html

proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; }; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "
2010-06-29 14:56:29
User: mechmind
Functions: alias sh sudo
Tags: history sudo
3

USAGE: $ sudor your command

This command uses a dirty hack with history, so be sure you not turned it off.

WARNING!

This command behavior differ from other commands. It more like text macro, so you shouldn't use it in subshells, non-interactive sessions, other functions/aliases and so on. You shouldn't pipe into sudor (any string that prefixes sudor will be removed), but if you really want, use this commands:

proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; pre_sudor_command="`history 1 | cut -d ' ' -f 5- | sed -r -e 's/sudor.*$//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`"; if [ -n "${pre_sudor_command/ */}" ] ; then eval "${pre_sudor_command%| *}" | sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; else sudo sh -c "$sudor_command" ;fi ;}; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "
alias sorth='sort --help|sed -n "/^ *-[^-]/s/^ *\(-[^ ]* -[^ ]*\) *\(.*\)/\1:\2/p"|column -ts":"'
3

Once you get into advanced/optimized scripts, functions, or cli usage, you will use the sort command alot. The options are difficult to master/memorize however, and when you use sort commands as much as I do (some examples below), it's useful to have the help available with a simple alias. I love this alias as I never seem to remember all the options for sort, and I use sort like crazy (much better than uniq for example).

# Sorts by file permissions

find . -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %p\n' | sort -k1 -r -g -bS 20%

00761 drwxrw---x ./tmp

00755 drwxr-xr-x .

00701 drwx-----x ./askapache-m

00644 -rw-r--r-- ./.htaccess

# Shows uniq history fast

history 1000 | sed 's/^[0-9 ]*//' | sort -fubdS 50%

exec bash -lxv

export TERM=putty-256color

Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

export PSOA='user,pid,time,state,command' ; function _ps { /bin/ps $@ ; } ; alias psa='_ps ax -o $PSOA'
2010-05-27 02:07:56
User: mattmartini
Functions: alias export
-1

#ps aliases

PSO='user,pid,ppid,%cpu,%mem,time,start,state,command'

PSOA='user,pid,time,state,command'

PSOL='user,pid,ppid,%cpu,%mem,nice,pri,etime,time,tt,state,ucomm'

export PSO PSOA PSOL

function _ps { /bin/ps $@ ; }

alias ps='_ps ax -o $PSO'

alias psa='_ps ax -o $PSOA'

alias psl='_ps ax -o $PSOL'

alias psm='_ps -U $USER -o $PSOA'

alias a=" killall rapidly_spawning_process"; a; a; a;
2010-05-20 02:33:28
User: raj77_in
Functions: alias
Tags: Linux unix kill
3

if you dont want to alias also then you can do

killall rapidly_spawning_process ; !! ; !! ; !!

alias termsize='echo $COLUMNS x $LINES'
alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
21

If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command.

# creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com

ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10

# create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory

tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz .

I personally find myself having to reference

date --help

quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner.

Here's the old version:

alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t'

This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ]

alias s='sudo'
2010-04-17 11:30:55
User: eimantas
Functions: alias
-12

This is way faster than typing 'sudo'. And AFAIK - there is no decent command for letter 's'.

alias head='head -n $((${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 12`} - 2))'
26

Run the alias command, then issue

ps aux | head

and resize your terminal window (putty/console/hyperterm/xterm/etc) then issue the same command and you'll understand.

${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 12`}

Insructs the shell that if LINES is not set or null to use the output from `tput lines` ( ncurses based terminal access ) to get the number of lines in your terminal. But furthermore, in case that doesn't work either, it will default to using the deafault of 12 (-2 = 10).

The default for HEAD is to output the first 10 lines, this alias changes the default to output the first x lines instead, where x is the number of lines currently displayed on your terminal - 2. The -2 is there so that the top line displayed is the command you ran that used HEAD, ie the prompt.

Depending on whether your PS1 and/or PROMPT_COMMAND output more than 1 line (mine is 3) you will want to increase from -2. So with my prompt being the following, I need -7, or - 5 if I only want to display the commandline at the top. ( http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash-power-prompt.html )

275MB/748MB

[7995:7993 - 0:186] 06:26:49 Thu Apr 08 [askapache@n1-backbone5:/dev/pts/0 +1] ~

In most shells the LINES variable is created automatically at login and updated when the terminal is resized (28 linux, 23/20 others for SIGWINCH) to contain the number of vertical lines that can fit in your terminal window. Because the alias doesn't hard-code the current LINES but relys on the $LINES variable, this is a dynamic alias that will always work on a tty device.

alias dush="du -sm *|sort -n|tail"
2010-03-26 10:18:57
User: funky
Functions: alias
28

sorts the files by integer megabytes, which should be enough to (interactively) find the space wasters. Now you can

dush

for the above output,

dush -n 3

for only the 3 biggest files and so on. It's always a good idea to have this line in your .profile or .bashrc

alias busy='my_file=$(find /usr/include -type f | sort -R | head -n 1); my_len=$(wc -l $my_file | awk "{print $1}"); let "r = $RANDOM % $my_len" 2>/dev/null; vim +$r $my_file'
2010-03-09 21:48:41
User: busybee
Functions: alias awk find head sort vim wc
22

This makes an alias for a command named 'busy'. The 'busy' command opens a random file in /usr/include to a random line with vim. Drop this in your .bash_aliases and make sure that file is initialized in your .bashrc.

alias ips='ip a | awk '\''/inet /&&!/ lo/{print $NF,$2}'\'' | column -t'
2010-03-06 20:33:04
User: zolden
Functions: alias awk column
3

ifconfig can't properly display interface's name longer 9 symbols,also it can't show IPs added thru ip command, so 'ip' should be used instead. This alias properly shows long names, bond interfaces and all interface aliases. loopback interface is ignored, since its IP is obvious

alias info='info --vi-keys'
2010-02-16 16:35:17
User: eightmillion
Functions: alias
Tags: alias info
3

I use this alias in my bashrc. The --vi-keys option makes info use vi-like and less-like key bindings.

echo alias xkcd="gwenview `w3m -dump http://xkcd.com/|grep png | awk '{print $5}'` 2> /dev/null" >> .bashrc
2010-01-30 20:38:16
User: GinoMan2440
Functions: alias echo
-5

Add an alias to your .bashrc that allows you to issue the command xkcd to view (with gwenview) the newest xkcd comic... I know there are thousands of them out there but this one is at least replete with installer and also uses a more concise syntax... plus, gwenview shows you the downloading progress as it downloads the comic and gives you a more full featured viewing experience.

alias rc='ssh ${MEDIAPCHOSTNAME} env DISPLAY=:0.0 rhythmbox-client --no-start'
2010-01-17 19:43:43
User: rhythmx
Functions: alias env
9

Note: you'll want to set up pub-key ssh auth. Gives you a quick means of changing volume/tracks/etc for rhythmbox on a remote machine. E.g.:

rc --next # Play next track

rc --print-playing # Grab the name

rc --volume-down

rc --help

alias PS1="man bash | sed -n '/ASCII bell/,/end a sequence/p'"
2010-01-15 23:39:28
User: haivu
Functions: alias
Tags: bash prompt ps1
3

I use this command (PS1) to show a list bash prompt's special characters. I tested it against A flavor of Red Hat Linux and Mac OS X

silent(){ $@ > /dev/null 2>&1; }; alias shh=silent
2010-01-04 01:01:03
User: bhepple
Functions: alias
8

Sometimes I just want to run a command quietly but all that keyboard shifting makes my fingers hurt. This little function does the job eg.:

if shh type less; then PAGER=less; fi
alias :q='tput setaf 1; echo >&2 "this is NOT vi(m) :/"; tput sgr0'
2009-12-08 12:59:44
User: sputnick
Functions: alias echo tput
Tags: vim alias vi tput
-1

For vi(m) users :

Add it in your ~/.bashrc

Add an "exit" @ the end if you are masochist ;)

alias burnaudiocd='mkdir ./temp && for i in *.[Mm][Pp]3;do mpg123 -w "./temp/${i%%.*}.wav" "$i";done;cdrecord -pad ./temp/* && rm -r ./temp'
2009-11-21 19:57:18
User: eightmillion
Functions: alias mpg123 rm
3

This uses mpg123 to convert the files to wav before burning, but you can use mplayer or mencoder or ffmpeg or lame with the --decode option, or whatever you like.

alias cstdin='echo "Ctrl-D when done." && gcc -Wall -o ~/.stdin.exe ~/.stdin.c && ~/.stdin.exe'
2009-11-19 16:38:51
User: taliver
Functions: alias gcc
-3

This is a quick hack to make a gcc caller. Since it runs with gcc instead of tcc, it's a bit more trustworthy as far as the final answers of things go.

alias gdbbt="gdb -q -n -ex bt -batch"
2009-11-10 22:56:59
User: TeacherTiger
Functions: alias
Tags: gdb
3

The pstack command prints a stack trace of running processes without needing to attach a debugger, but what about core files? The answer, of course, is to use this command. Usage: gdbbt program corefile