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Commands using awk from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using awk - 1,097 results
echo "rootgot" | awk 'BEGIN{FIELDWIDTHS="4 3"}{print $2$1}'
for key in `echo 'KEYS pattern*' | redis-cli | awk '{print $1}'`; do echo DEL $key; done | redis-cli
2013-10-29 04:50:35
User: caiosba
Functions: awk echo
0

Delete items from Redis, using redis-cli, by matching a key pattern.

find . -type f -not -empty -printf "%-25s%p\n"|sort -n|uniq -D -w25|cut -b26-|xargs -d"\n" -n1 md5sum|sed "s/ /\x0/"|uniq -D -w32|awk -F"\0" 'BEGIN{l="";}{if(l!=$1||l==""){printf "\n%s\0",$1}printf "\0%s",$2;l=$1}END{printf "\n"}'|sed "/^$/d"
2013-10-22 13:34:19
User: alafrosty
Functions: awk cut find sed sort uniq xargs
0

* Find all file sizes and file names from the current directory down (replace "." with a target directory as needed).

* sort the file sizes in numeric order

* List only the duplicated file sizes

* drop the file sizes so there are simply a list of files (retain order)

* calculate md5sums on all of the files

* replace the first instance of two spaces (md5sum output) with a \0

* drop the unique md5sums so only duplicate files remain listed

* Use AWK to aggregate identical files on one line.

* Remove the blank line from the beginning (This was done more efficiently by putting another "IF" into the AWK command, but then the whole line exceeded the 255 char limit).

>>>> Each output line contains the md5sum and then all of the files that have that identical md5sum. All fields are \0 delimited. All records are \n delimited.

svn status | awk '$1!~"M" {print $0}'
2013-10-17 15:55:27
User: jorgesenin
Functions: awk
2

En entornos de desarrollos muchas veces se mezclan ficheros y debemos revisar si algo se nos ha quedado fuera del proyecto. Con esta linea de comando busco todos los ficheros que no sean M ( modificados ) para valorar si tengo que agregarlo al repositorio de subversion.

Adem?s siempre se me olvida como usar un condicional con awk para una columna :D

awk '{ c=NR%n; a[c]=$0 } END{ for(i=1; i<=n; i++) print a[(c+i)%n] }' n=10 File
2013-10-16 18:47:54
User: erix
Functions: awk
2

This awk codes emulates tail. For efficiency it uses a circular array, which stores only N number of records. Using awk gives the flexibility of modifying the output as needed, for example adding the record number (NR) at the output and much more.

grep cwd /var/log/exim_mainlog | grep -v /var/spool | awk -F"cwd=" '{print $2}' | awk '{print $1}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n
make --print-data-base --dry-run | awk -F':' '/^[a-zA-Z0-9][^$#\/\t=]*:([^=]|$)/ {split($1,A,/ /);for(i in A)print A[i]}'
awk '{pattern=$1$2; seen[pattern]++; if (seen[pattern] == 1) print NR}' inputFile
awk 'BEGIN {count=0;prev=-1} {if(count>0) { if(int($1/100) > int(prev/100)) {print $1} } ; prev=$1; count++}' inputFile > rounded
for f in .; do awk 'BEGIN {sum=0;flag=0} {sum=sum+$1; if (flag == 0) { print $1"\t"sum > "cumulative.'$f'" } if (sum > 100) flag=1 }' $f; done
echo 0$(awk '/Pss/ {printf "+"$2}' /proc/$PID/smaps)|bc
2013-09-26 18:20:22
User: atoponce
Functions: awk echo
Tags: Linux awk echo bc proc
5

The "proportional set size" is probably the closest representation of how much active memory a process is using in the Linux virtual memory stack. This number should also closely represent the %mem found in ps(1), htop(1), and other utilities.

grep "10/Sep/2013" access.log| cut -d[ -f2 | cut -d] -f1 | awk -F: '{print $2":"$3}' | sort -nk1 -nk2 | uniq -c | awk '{ if ($1 > 10) print $0}'
netstat -ntu | awk ' $5 ~ /^(::ffff:|[0-9|])/ { gsub("::ffff:","",$5); print $5}' | cut -d: -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
2013-09-10 19:28:06
User: mrwulf
Functions: awk cut netstat sort uniq
1

Same as the rest, but handle IPv6 short IPs. Also, sort in the order that you're probably looking for.

function garg () { tail -n 1 ${HISTFILE} | awk "{ print \$$1 }" }
2013-09-10 04:07:46
User: plasticphyte
Functions: awk tail
0

This gets the Nth argument in the last line of your history file. This is useful where history is being written after each command, and you want to use arguments from the previous command in the current command, such as when doing copies/moving directories etc.

I wrote this after getting irritated with having to continually type in long paths/arguments.

You could also use $_ if all you want is the last argument.

for I in $(awk -v LIMIT=500 -F: '($3>=LIMIT) && ($3!=65534)' /etc/passwd | cut -f 1-1 -d ':' | xargs); do usermod -g YOURGROUP $I ; done
host example.com | head -1 | awk '{print $4}'
nslookup www.example.com | tail -2 | head -1 | awk '{print $2}'
2013-09-05 20:26:45
User: wsams
Functions: awk head nslookup tail
0

I'm not sure how reliable this command is, but it works for my needs. Here's also a variant using grep.

nslookup www.example.com | grep "^Address: " | awk '{print $2}'

for i in `ip addr show dev eth1 | grep inet | awk '{print $2}' | cut -d/ -f1`; do echo -n $i; echo -en '\t'; host $i | awk '{print $5}'; done
apt-cache -n dumpavail | grep 'Package:' | awk '{print $2 }'
ipcs -q | grep foo | awk '{print $2}' | xargs -I ipcid ipcrm -q ipcid
brew cleanup -n | awk '{print $3}' | xargs du -s | awk '{s+=$1} END {print s}'
curl -s poncho.is/forecast/new_york/today/ | grep -E 'og:title|og:description' | cut -d\" -f4 | awk '{print $0,"<p>"}' | lynx -stdin -dump
tail -n 1000 access.log | grep "200 POST" | awk '{print substr($3,0,9)}' | awk '{data[$0]++}END{for(item in data){print item, data[item]}}'
du -Lsbc * |awk 'function hr(bytes){hum[1024**4]="TiB";hum[1024**3]="GiB";hum[1024**2]="MiB";hum[1024]="kiB";for(x=1024**4;x>=1024;x/=1024){if(bytes>=x){return sprintf("%8.3f %s",bytes/x,hum[x]);}}return sprintf("%4d B",bytes);}{print hr($1) "\t" $2}'
ip addr show |grep -w inet | grep -v 127.0.0.1 | awk '{ print $2}'| cut -d "/" -f 2
2013-08-17 18:54:23
User: htmlgifted
Functions: awk cut grep
0

This command give you Just the Network Cidr Notation