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Commands using awk from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using awk - 1,163 results
ssh root@`for ((i=100; i<=110; i++));do arp -a 192.168.1.$i; done | grep 00:35:cf:56:b2:2g | awk '{print $2}' | sed -e 's/(//' -e 's/)//'`
2009-09-09 04:32:20
User: gean01
Functions: arp awk grep sed ssh
8

Connect to a machine running ssh using mac address by using the "arp" command

echo src::${PATH} | awk 'BEGIN{pwd=ENVIRON["PWD"];RS=":";FS="\n"}!$1{$1=pwd}$1!~/^\//{$1=pwd"/"$1}{print $1}'
2009-09-09 04:03:46
User: arcege
Functions: awk echo
Tags: awk echo PATH
-2

Removes trailing newline; colon becomes record separator and newline becomes field separator, only the first field is ever printed. Replaces empty entries with $PWD. Also prepend relative directories (like ".") with the current directory ($PWD). Can change PWD with env(1) to get tricky in (non-Bourne) scripts.

find . -name \*.c | xargs wc -l | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}'
2009-09-08 08:25:45
User: karpoke
Functions: awk find tail wc xargs
Tags: awk find wc
0

This is really fast :)

time find . -name \*.c | xargs wc -l | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}'

204753

real 0m0.191s

user 0m0.068s

sys 0m0.116s

ls -ldct /lost+found |awk '{print $6, $7}'
curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | sed -n "s/<title>\(.*\)<\/title.*name>\(.*\)<\/name>.*/\2 - \1/p"
2009-09-07 21:56:40
User: postrational
Functions: awk sed tr
42

Checks the Gmail ATOM feed for your account, parses it and outputs a list of unread messages.

For some reason sed gets stuck on OS X, so here's a Perl version for the Mac:

curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*<name>(.*)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/'

If you want to see the name of the last person, who added a message to the conversation, change the greediness of the operators like this:

curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*?<name>(.*?)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/'
fuser -k `who -u | awk '$6 == "old" { print "/dev/"$2'}`
2009-09-07 03:36:43
User: lbonanomi
Functions: awk fuser
Tags: Linux solaris
2

Shell timeout variables (TMOUT) can be very liberal about what is classified as 'activity', like having an editor open. This command string will terminate the login shell for an user with more than a day's idle time.

pkg search SEARCH_TERM | awk '{print $NF}' | sed -e 's;.*/\(.*\)\@.*;\1;' | sort -u
awk 'BEGIN {a=1;b=1;for(i=0;i<'${NUM}';i++){print a;c=a+b;a=b;b=c}}'
2009-09-06 03:05:55
User: arcege
Functions: awk
Tags: awk
0

Does not require input to function or complete. Number of iterations controlled by shell variable $NUM.

ls -lct /etc/ | tail -1 | awk '{print $6, $7, $8}'
2009-09-04 16:52:50
User: peshay
Functions: awk ls tail
5

shows also time if its the same year or shows year if installed before actual year and also works if /etc is a link (mac os)

find . -type f -name '*.c' -exec wc -l {} \; | awk '{sum+=$1} END {print sum}'
2009-09-04 15:51:30
User: arcege
Functions: awk find wc
Tags: awk find wc
-1

Have wc work on each file then add up the total with awk; get a 43% speed increase on RHEL over using "-exec cat|wc -l" and a 67% increase on my Ubuntu laptop (this is with 10MB of data in 767 files).

find . -exec grep foobar /dev/null {} \; | awk -F: '{print $1}' | xargs vi
grep -ir 'foo' * | awk -F '{print $1}' | xargs vim
grep -ir 'foo' * | awk '{print $1}' | sed -e 's/://' | xargs vim
2009-09-03 15:12:27
User: elubow
Functions: awk grep sed xargs
Tags: vim sed awk grep
0

This will drop you into vim to edit all files that contain your grep string.

ls -lct /etc | tail -1 | awk '{print $6, $7}'
2009-09-03 10:26:37
User: MrMerry
Functions: awk ls tail
10

Show time and date when you installed your OS.

echo sortmeplease | awk '{l=split($1,a,"");asort(a);while(x<=l){printf "%s",a[x];x++ }print "";}'
2009-09-03 10:22:39
User: foob4r
Functions: awk echo
-1

using awk

missed the last char thanks @Josay

nmap -R -sL 209.85.229.99/27 | awk '{if($3=="not")print"("$2") no PTR";else print$3" is "$2}' | grep '('
2009-09-02 16:33:15
User: netsaint
Functions: awk grep
Tags: nmap dns
4

This command uses nmap to perform reverse DNS lookups on a subnet. It produces a list of IP addresses with the corresponding PTR record for a given subnet. You can enter the subnet in CDIR notation (i.e. /24 for a Class C)). You could add "--dns-servers x.x.x.x" after the "-sL" if you need the lookups to be performed on a specific DNS server.

On some installations nmap needs sudo I believe. Also I hope awk is standard on most distros.

awk '/d.[0-9]/{print $4}' /proc/partitions
2009-09-02 15:26:03
User: akg240
Functions: awk
3

Only one command and not dependant on full read access to the devices.

fdisk -l |grep -e '^/' |awk '{print $1}'|sed -e "s|/dev/||g"
free -m | awk '/Swap/ {print $4}'
2009-09-02 11:46:17
User: voyeg3r
Functions: awk free
-2

simple way to show free swap

awk '{print substr($0, index($0,$N))}'
2009-08-31 19:47:10
User: mstoecker
Functions: awk
0

This command will print all fields from the given input to the end of each line, starting with the Nth field.

awk '{print $1}' /var/log/httpd/access_log | sort | uniq -c | sort -rnk1 | head -n 10
curl -s wap.kitco.com/exrate.wml | awk ' BEGIN { x=0; FS = "<" } { if ($0~"^<br/>") {x=0} if (x==1) {print $1} if ($0~"EUR/US") {x=1} }'
2009-08-27 16:30:19
User: jamaese
Functions: awk
4

You can get others rates changing the "EUR/US" part. look at the url: wap.kitco.com/exrate.wml to get more options.

cat /service/solr/log/main/current | tai64nlocal | grep "\(`date '+%F %H'`\|`date '+%F %H %M' | awk '{print $1" 0"$2-1":"$3}'`\)" | grep QTime | awk '{print $NF}' | awk -F\= '{ s += $2} END {print s/NR}'
echo 1234567890 | awk '{ print strftime("%c", $0); }'
2009-08-25 09:37:54
User: alvinx
Functions: awk echo
7

- convert unixtime to human-readable with awk

- useful to read logfiles with unix-timestamps, f.e. squid-log:

sudo tail -f /var/log/squid3/access.log | awk '{ print strftime("%c ", $1) $0; }

echo `date +%m/%d/%y%X |awk '{print $1;}' `" => "` cat /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/temperature | awk '{print $2, $3;}'` >> datetmp.log
2009-08-24 21:26:29
User: ninadsp
Functions: awk cat echo
7

Uses the data in the /proc system, provided by the acpid, to find out the CPU temperature. Can be run on systems without lm-sensors installed as well.