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Commands using awk from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using awk - 1,113 results
while [ i != 0 ]; do sleep 1 | dialog --clear --gauge "Quality: " 0 0 $(cat /proc/net/wireless | grep $WIRELESSINTERFACE | awk '{print $3}' | tr -d "."); done
2009-05-31 16:09:23
User: ncaio
Functions: awk cat grep sleep tr
1

The variable WIRELESSINTERFACE indicates your wireless interface

pdfinfo Virtualization_A_Beginner_Guide.pdf | awk /Pages/
mkdir -p /cdrom/unnamed_cdrom ; mount -F hsfs -o ro `ls -al /dev/sr* |awk '{print "/dev/" $11}'` /cdrom/unnamed_cdrom
2009-05-31 08:42:20
User: felix001
Functions: awk mkdir mount
-2

This will allow you to mount a CD-ROM on Solaris SPARC 9 or lower. This will not work on Solaris 10 due to void and the volume management daemons.

www.fir3net.com

for i in `svn status | egrep '^(M|A)' | sed -r 's/\+\s+//' | awk '{ print $2 }'` ; do if [ ! -d $i ] ; then php -l $i ; fi ; done
2009-05-29 23:59:28
Functions: awk egrep sed
Tags: svn Linux PHP
0

Really only valuable in a PHP-only project directory. This is using standard linux versions of the tools. On most older BSD variants of sed, use -E instead of -r. Or use: sed 's/\+[[:space:]]\{1,\}//' instead.

awk 'BEGIN{srand()}{print rand(),$0}' SOMEFILE | sort -n | cut -d ' ' -f2-
2009-05-29 01:20:50
User: axelabs
Functions: awk cut sort
Tags: sort awk random
4

This appends a random number as a first filed of all lines in SOMEFILE then sorts by the first column and finally cuts of the random numbers.

awk 'BEGIN{size=5} {mod=NR%size; if(NR<=size){count++}else{sum-=array[mod]};sum+=$1;array[mod]=$1;print sum/count}' file.dat
2009-05-29 00:07:24
User: mungewell
Functions: awk
2

Sometimes jittery data hides trends, performing a rolling average can give a clearer view.

mysql -s -e "show processlist" |awk '{print $1}'
svn log fileName|cut -d" " -f 1|grep -e "^r[0-9]\{1,\}$"|awk {'sub(/^r/,"",$1);print "svn cat fileName@"$1" > /tmp/fileName.r"$1'}|sh
2009-05-27 02:11:58
User: fizz
Functions: awk cut grep
Tags: bash svn awk grep
2

exported files will get a .r23 extension (where 23 is the revision number)

lsof -nP +p 24073 | grep -i listen | awk '{print $1,$2,$7,$8,$9}'
kill_daemon() { echo "Daemon?"; read dm; kill -15 $(netstat -atulpe | grep $dm | cut -d '/' -f1 | awk '{print $9}') }; alias kd='kill_daemon
2009-05-26 20:39:56
User: P17
-5

Just find out the daemon with $ netstat -atulpe. Then type in his name and he gets the SIGTERM.

ip route show dev eth0 | awk '{print $7}'
2009-05-26 20:29:54
User: P17
Functions: awk route
Tags: IP
2
ip address show | grep eth0 | sed '1d' | awk '{print $2}'

does the same, but shows network-prefix.

netstat -ntlp | grep -w 80 | awk '{print $7}' | cut -d/ -f1
function autoCompleteHostname() { local hosts; local cur; hosts=($(awk '{print $1}' ~/.ssh/known_hosts | cut -d, -f1)); cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]}; COMPREPLY=($(compgen -W '${hosts[@]}' -- $cur )) } complete -F autoCompleteHostname ssh
2009-05-17 23:12:34
User: sbisordi
Functions: awk cut
6

This is meant for the bash shell. Put this function in your .profile and you'll be able to use tab-completion for sshing any host which is in your known_hosts file. This assumes that your known_hosts file is located at ~/.ssh/known_hosts. The "complete" command should go on a separate line as such:

function autoCompleteHostname() {

local hosts=($(awk '{print $1}' ~/.ssh/known_hosts | cut -d, -f1));

local cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]};

COMPREPLY=($(compgen -W '${hosts[@]}' -- $cur ))

}

complete -F autoCompleteHostname ssh

find . -name \*.mp3 -printf "%C+ %h/%f\n" | sort -r | head -n20 | awk '{print "\""$2"\""}' | xargs -I {} cp {} ~/tmp
2009-05-17 07:06:10
User: bkinsey
Functions: awk cp find head sort xargs
2

Change ~/tmp to the destination directory, such as your mounted media. Change -n20 to whatever number of files to copy. It should quit when media is full. I use this to put my most recently downloaded podcasts onto my phone.

svn st | grep '^\?' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs svn add; svn st | grep '^\!' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs svn rm
2009-05-14 14:34:50
User: stedwick
Functions: awk grep xargs
0

automatically add and remove files in subversion so that you don't have to do it through the annoying svn commands anymore

chkconfig --list | fgrep :on | sed -e 's/\(^.*\)*0:off/\1:/g' -e 's/\(.\):on/\1/g' -e 's/.:off//g' | tr -d [:blank:] | awk -F: '{print$2,$1}' | ssh host 'cat > foo'
2009-05-13 21:17:39
User: catawampus
2

And then to complete the task:

Go to target host;

ssh host

Turn everything off:

for i in `chkconfig --list | fgrep :on | awk '{print $1}'` ; do chkconfig --level 12345 $i off; done

Create duplicate config:

while read line; do chkconfig --level $line on; done < foo
du -sb *|sort -nr|head|awk '{print $2}'|xargs du -sh
ip route show dev ppp0 | awk '{ print $7 }'
awk -F\" '{print $4}' *.log | grep -v "eviljaymz\|\-" | sort | uniq -c | awk -F\ '{ if($1>500) print $1,$2;}' | sort -n
2009-05-05 22:21:04
User: jaymzcd
Functions: awk grep sort uniq
1

This prints a summary of your referers from your logs as long as they occurred a certain number of times (in this case 500). The grep command excludes the terms, I add this in to remove results Im not interested in.

Q="reddit|digg"; F=*.log; awk -F\" '{print $4}' $F | egrep $Q | wc -l
2009-05-05 21:51:16
User: jaymzcd
Functions: awk egrep wc
0

I use this (well I normally just drop the F=*.log bit and put that straight into the awk command) to count how many times I get referred from another site. I know its rough, its to give me an idea where any posts I make are ending up. The reason I do the Q="query" bit is because I often want to check another domain quickly and its quick to use CTRL+A to jump to the start and then CTRL+F to move forward the 3 steps to change the grep query. (I find this easier than moving backwards because if you group a lot of domains with the pipe your command line can get quite messy so its normally easier to have it all at the front so you just have to edit it & hit enter).

For people new to the shell it does the following. The Q and F equals bits just make names we can refer to. The awk -F\" '{print $4}' $F reads the file specified by $F and splits it up using double-quotes. It prints out the fourth column for egrep to work on. The 4th column in the log is the referer domain. egrep then matches our query against this list from awk. Finally wc -l gives us the total number of lines (i.e. matches).

ps -eo user,pcpu,pmem | tail -n +2 | awk '{num[$1]++; cpu[$1] += $2; mem[$1] += $3} END{printf("NPROC\tUSER\tCPU\tMEM\n"); for (user in cpu) printf("%d\t%s\t%.2f%\t%.2f%\n",num[user], user, cpu[user], mem[user]) }'
wget -q -O- http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/cprfd10.txt | sed '1,419d' | tr "\n" " " | tr " " "\n" | perl -lpe 's/\W//g;$_=lc($_)' | grep "^[a-z]" | awk 'length > 1' | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2"\t"$1}'
2009-05-04 16:00:39
User: alperyilmaz
Functions: awk grep perl sed sort tr uniq wget
-4

This command might not be useful for most of us, I just wanted to share it to show power of command line.

Download simple text version of novel David Copperfield from Poject Gutenberg and then generate a single column of words after which occurences of each word is counted by sort | uniq -c combination.

This command removes numbers and single characters from count. I'm sure you can write a shorter version.

p=$(netstat -nate 2>/dev/null | awk '/LISTEN/ {gsub (/.*:/, "", $4); if ($4 == "4444") {print $8}}'); for i in $(ls /proc/|grep "^[1-9]"); do [[ $(ls -l /proc/$i/fd/|grep socket|sed -e 's|.*\[\(.*\)\]|\1|'|grep $p) ]] && cat /proc/$i/cmdline && echo; done
2009-04-30 12:39:48
User: j0rn
Functions: awk cat grep ls netstat sed
-5

Ok so it's rellay useless line and I sorry for that, furthermore that's nothing optimized at all...

At the beginning I didn't managed by using netstat -p to print out which process was handling that open port 4444, I realize at the end I was not root and security restrictions applied ;p

It's nevertheless a (good ?) way to see how ps(tree) works, as it acts exactly the same way by reading in /proc

So for a specific port, this line returns the calling command line of every thread that handle the associated socket

w | egrep -v '(load|FROM)' | awk '{print $2}' | sed 's/^/tty/' | awk '{print "echo \"The Matrix has you...\" >> /dev/" $1}' | bash
2009-04-29 22:04:56
User: copremesis
Functions: awk egrep sed
-12

This works just like write or wall ... cept one thing the sender is anonymous ... if you really want to drive everyone insane replace echo \"The Matrix has you...\" with cat /dev/urandom

nice one to do on April fool's day

ps auxf | grep httpd | grep -v grep | grep -v defunct | awk '{sum=sum+$6}; END {print sum/1024}'