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Commands using cat from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using cat - 435 results
colordiff <(ssh user@host cat /etc/ssh/sshd_config) /etc/ssh/sshd_config
find /usr/include/ -name '*.[c|h]pp' -o -name '*.[ch]' -print0 | xargs -0 cat | grep -v "^ *$" | grep -v "^ *//" | grep -v "^ */\*.*\*/" | wc -l
2013-06-17 08:37:37
Functions: cat find grep wc xargs
1

Count your source and header file's line numbers. This ignores blank lines, C++ style comments, single line C style comments.

This will not ignore blank lines with tabs or multiline C style comments.

cat filein | ssh destination.com -c arcfour,blowfish-cbc -C -p 50005 "cat - > /tmp/fileout"
2013-05-30 07:18:46
User: bhbmaster
Functions: cat ssh
Tags: cat ssh
0

Where filein is the source file, destination.com is the ssh server im copying the file to, -c arcfour,blowfish-cbc is selecting the fastest encryption engines, -C is for online compressions and decompression when it comes off the line - supposed to speed up tx in some cases, then the /tmp/fileout is how the file is saved...

I talk more about it on my site, where there is more room to talk about this:

http://www.kossboss.com/linuxtarpvncssh

and

http://www.kossboss.com/linux---transfer-1-file-with-ssh

diff /path/to/localfile <(ssh user@host cat /path/to/remotefile)
2013-05-24 09:24:31
User: mc0e
Functions: cat diff ssh
-1

Or, if you have restricted access for sftp only, I think you can still do this:

diff /path/to/localfile <(scp user@host:/path/to/remotefile >(cat))
cat domainlist.txt | while read line; do echo -ne $line; whois $line | grep Expiration ; done | sed 's:Expiration Date::'
cat file.gz.cpt *[a-z] | ccdecrypt -k yoursecretpassword | tar -xzf -
cat /dev/ttyS2 | hexdump -C
cat foo.json | python -mjson.tool
2013-05-06 20:11:05
User: jeffgage
Functions: cat python
Tags: json
1

For situations where you keep JSON in a VCS and you want your diffs to be sane, such as within a Chef configuration repo.

cat -n install.log | head -88 | tac | head -n $(( 88 - 50 )) | tac
cat -n install | head -n 150 | tac | head -n 50 | tac
cat $HISTFILE | grep command
cat data.json >data.yml
2013-04-25 04:09:58
User: Mozai
Functions: cat
Tags: json yaml
-5

Valid JSON is a subset of YAML; no transformation is necessary; however, YAML has many syntax features that are not valid JSON, so you can't do the reverse as easily.

OIFS=$IFS;IFS=$':';for i in $(cat -n /etc/passwd);do echo -n $i\ ** \ ;done
cat .bash_history | tail -100 | grep {command}
2013-04-10 10:40:52
User: techie
Functions: cat grep tail
-9

I know how hard it is to find an old command running through all the files because you couldn't remember for your life what it was. Heres the solution!! Grep the history for it. depending on how old the command you can head or tail or if you wanted to search all because you cannot think how long ago it was then miss out the middle part of the command. This is a very easy and effective way to find that command you are looking for.

rm index.html | wget www.google.com;cat index.html | sed 's/<script>/\n\n\<script>\n\n/g' | sed 's/<\/script>/>\n\n/g'
2013-04-10 04:05:30
User: lbhack
Functions: cat rm sed wget
0

remove old index.html if you download it again and organiaz the java script tag on the file index.html

cat /sys/block/md1/holders/dm*/dm/name | awk -F- '{print $1}' | sort -u
cat /sys/block/{*,*/*}/holders/dm*/dm/name | awk -F- '{print $1}' | sort -u
for a in $(seq 5 8); do cat twit.txt | cut -d " " -f$a | grep "^@" | sort -u; done > followlst.txt
2013-03-29 21:07:09
User: xmuda
Functions: cat cut grep seq sort
-6

Go to "https://twitter.com/search/realtime?q=%23TeamFollowBack&src=hash" and then copy al the text on the page. If you scroll down the page will be bigger. Then put al the text in a text file called twit.txt

If you follow the user there is a high probability the users give you follow back.

To follow all the users you can use an iMacros script.

cat -s
while read line; do export $line; done < <(cat input)
2013-03-15 08:14:04
User: dario
Functions: cat export read
0

This exports all lines of input file as environment variables, assuming each line is like these:

OH=YEAH

FU=UUUU

cat /var/lib/dpkg/info/*.md5sums|grep usr/sbin/sshd|sed 's,usr,/usr,'|md5sum -c
2013-03-12 11:20:48
User: Ztyx
Functions: cat grep md5sum sed
0

Replace "user/sbin/sshd" with the file you would like to check. If you are doing this due to intrusion, you obviously would want to check size, last modification date and md5 of the md5sum application itself. Also, note that "/var/lib/dpkg/info/*.md5sums" files might have been tampered with themselves. Neither to say, this is a useful command.

echo "ls" > script.bash; gpg -c script.bash; cat script.bash.gpg | gpg -d --no-mdc-warning | bash
2013-03-10 09:34:12
User: betsubetsu
Functions: cat echo gpg
-2

echo "ls" > script.bash;

This is my script, a simple 'ls'.

gpg -c script.bash;

Here I encrypt and passord-protect my script. This creates file script.bash.gpg.

cat script.bash.gpg | gpg -d --no-mdc-warning | bash

Here I open file script.bash.gpg, decrypt it and execute it.

read -p 'Script: ' S && C=$S.crypt H='eval "$((dd if=$0 bs=1 skip=//|gpg -d)2>/dev/null)"; exit;' && gpg -c<$S|cat >$C <(echo $H|sed s://:$(echo "$H"|wc -c):) - <(chmod +x $C)
2013-03-10 08:59:45
User: rodolfoap
Functions: cat chmod echo gpg read sed wc
6

(Please see sample output for usage)

Use any script name (the read command gets it) and it will be encrypted with the extension .crypt, i.e.:

myscript --> myscript.crypt

You can execute myscript.crypt only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you.

If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string).

Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner.

Sorry for the chmod on parentheses, I dont like "-" at the end.

Thanks flatcap for the subshell abbreviation to /dev/null

cat item_list | xargs -n1 -P<n> process_item
cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep " lm " > /dev/null && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits
2013-02-11 22:54:26
User: agd
Functions: cat echo grep
1

CPU flags:

rm --> 16-bit processor (real mode)

tm --> 32-bit processor (? mode)

lm --> 64-bit processor (long mode)