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Commands using column from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using column - 34 results
alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
21

If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command.

# creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com

ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10

# create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory

tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz .

I personally find myself having to reference

date --help

quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner.

Here's the old version:

alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t'

This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ]

phonelogs() { grep "$1" /var/log/asterisk/cdr-csv/Master.csv | cut -d',' -f 2,3,11,12 --output-delimiter=" " | sed 's/"//g' | cut -d' ' -f 1,2,3,4,6 | column -t; }
2010-03-28 08:30:46
Functions: column cut grep sed
Tags: asterisk
3

Prints a log of phonecalls placed from/to an asterisk server, formated into an easily readable table.

You can use partial number/queue matches, or use .* to match everything.

alias ips='ip a | awk '\''/inet /&&!/ lo/{print $NF,$2}'\'' | column -t'
2010-03-06 20:33:04
User: zolden
Functions: alias awk column
3

ifconfig can't properly display interface's name longer 9 symbols,also it can't show IPs added thru ip command, so 'ip' should be used instead. This alias properly shows long names, bond interfaces and all interface aliases. loopback interface is ignored, since its IP is obvious

python -c 'import sys,csv; c = csv.reader(sys.stdin); [sys.stdout.write("^M".join(map(repr,r))+"\n") for r in c];' <tmp/test.csv | column -s '^M' -t
2010-02-01 14:57:25
User: pykler
Functions: c++ column python
Tags: CSV
1

Will handle pretty much all types of CSV Files.

The ^M character is typed on the command line using Ctrl-V Ctrl-M and can be replaced with any character that does not appear inside the CSV.

Tips for simpler CSV files:

* If newlines are not placed within a csv cell then you can replace `map(repr, r)` with r

/sbin/ip -f inet addr | sed -rn 's/.*inet ([^ ]+).*(eth[[:digit:]]*(:[[:digit:]]+)?)/\2 \1/p' | column -t
(printf "PERMISSIONS LINKS OWNER GROUP SIZE MONTH DAY HH:MM PROG-NAME\n" \ ; ls -l | sed 1d) | column -t
column -s, -t <tmp.csv
2009-09-24 20:57:32
User: pykler
Functions: column
17

Splits the input based on commas and prints it in a nice column format. This would not work for CSV rows that have "," between quotes or with newline characters. Use only simple simple csv files.

column -t /proc/mounts
2009-08-09 17:00:41
Functions: column
10

since fuse mounts do not appear in /etc/mtab (fuse can't write there, dunno if it would if it could) this is propably a better way.

mount | column -t
2009-03-20 14:18:56
User: thechile
Functions: column mount
238

Particularly useful if you're mounting different drives, using the following command will allow you to see all the filesystems currently mounted on your computer and their respective specs with the added benefit of nice formatting.