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Commands using cp from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using cp - 99 results
for FILE in `ls -1`; do if [ -L "$FILE" ]; then cp $(readlink "$FILE") ${FILE}_rf; rm -f $FILE; mv ${FILE}_rf "$FILE"; fi; done
cp -r * .??* /dest
2011-12-16 23:41:03
User: atoponce
Functions: cp
Tags: mv rm cp
6

You could do the following, however, brace expansion with {} is not defined in POSIX, and therefore not guaranteed to work in all shells. But, if it does, it's more convenient (although it's certainly not less typing):

cp -r {*,.??*} /dest

Sometimes there are times when I need to cp(1), mv(1) or rm(1) files recursively, but don't want to traverse the previous directory by following ../../../../ etc out of the current directory. This command prevents that. The secret sauce is ".??*". The file globbing ensures that it must start with a dot, and be followed by at least two characters. So, three characters must exist in the filename, which eliminates "." and "..".

cp -a /etc /destination
find <start directory> -iname "<all my files type>" -exec cp {} <target_dir> \;
cp /work/host/phone/ui/main.cpp !#$:s/host/target
2011-09-20 06:48:07
User: kev
Functions: cp
Tags: !!
33

expand to:

cp /work/host/phone/ui/main.cpp /work/target/phone/ui/main.cpp

!#

The entire command line typed so far.

cp --sparse=always <SRC> <DST>
2011-09-07 08:02:50
User: h3xx
Functions: cp
4

This causes cp to detect and omit large blocks of nulls. Sparse files are useful for implying a lot of disk space without actually having to write it all out.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparse_file

You can use it in a pipe too:

dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=5 |cp --sparse=always /dev/stdin SPARSE_FILE
cp -dpRx /* /mnt/target/
2011-08-22 14:22:01
Functions: cp
-1

preserve all except context and xattr. useful when moving a running system to a new partition.

sedit() { cp "$*"{,.bk}; which $EDITOR > /dev/null && $EDITOR "$*" || vim "$*"; }
2011-08-16 18:28:22
User: kaedenn
Functions: cp vim which
-6

Some people put spaces in filenames. Others have an $EDITOR environment variable set. This defaults to vim, but you can use whatever you wish: emacs, nano, ed, butterflies, etc.

cp httpd.conf{,.bk}
2011-08-15 16:43:53
User: ideivid
Functions: cp
Tags: backup cp
17

Remember to backup everything before changing it so you can restore all to normal.

cp /dev/cdrom file.iso
find ~ -name "*.ttf" -exec cp {} /usr/share/fonts/truetype \; & fc-cache -f
2011-05-25 20:18:33
User: scripteles
Functions: cp fc-cache find
0

1) Find true type fonts;

2) Copy them to /usr/share/fonts/truetype;

3) Reload font information.

for file in `find *| sort -n | sed 's% %?%g'`; do echo "${file//?/ }"; cp --parents "${file//?/ }" /destinity_folder/ ;done
v () { ( IFS=$'\n'; suf="_versions"; mkdir -p "$1$suf"; nr=`ls "$1$suf" | wc -l`; nr=`printf "%02d" $(($nr + 1))`; cp "$1" "$1$suf/v${nr}_$1" ) }
2011-04-22 07:33:51
User: dubnov
Functions: cp mkdir wc
Tags: bash copy
0

Bash function copies a file prefixed with a version number to a subdirectory

cp filename{,.`date +%Y%m%d`}
2011-04-02 06:41:26
Functions: cp
Tags: backup copy
4

This is a BASH feature.

The above command will create a backup of "filename" called "filename.DATE", where DATE is the actual day in %Y%m%d (year, month and day numbers together) format.

files -type f | xargs -n100 | while read l; do mkdir $((++f)); cp $l $f; done
2011-02-15 23:15:16
User: flatcap
Functions: cp mkdir read xargs
-2

Take a folder full of files and split it into smaller folders containing a maximum number of files. In this case, 100 files per directory.

find creates the list of files

xargs breaks up the list into groups of 100

for each group, create a directory and copy in the files

Note: This command won't work if there is whitespace in the filenames (but then again, neither do the alternative commands :-)

find files/ -type f | while read line; do if [ $((i++%100)) -eq 0 ]; then mkdir $((++folder)); fi; cp $line $folder/; done
s=/etc/ssh/sshd_config;r=PermitRootLogin;cp $s{,.old}&& if grep $r $s;then sed "s/$r yes/$r no/" $s.old > $s; else echo $r no >> $s;fi
2011-01-30 23:41:59
User: kzh
Functions: cp echo grep sed
Tags: bash openssh
-1

This will tighten up security for your box. The default value for PermitRootLogin sadly is 'yes'.

cp -i FILENAME{,.`date +%Y%m%d`}
buf() { cp -v $1 ${1/${1%%.*}/$f-$(date +"%Y%m%d_%H%M%S")};}
buf() { f=${1%%.*};e=${1/$f/};cp -v $1 $f-$(date +"%Y%m%d_%H%M%S")$e;}
2010-12-15 09:50:04
User: unefunge
Functions: cp date
0

"infix" version in bash (4.x+)

Remove -v to make it silent.

BTW: The OP forgot to use "cat" and "nmap" ;-) I had a good laugh though.

buf () {oldname=$1; if [ "$oldname" != "" ]; then datepart=$(date +%Y-%m-%d); firstpart=`echo $oldname | cut -d "." -f 1`; newname=`echo $oldname | sed s/$firstpart/$firstpart.$datepart/`; cp -i ${oldname} ${newname}; fi }
2010-12-14 19:58:34
User: Seebi
Functions: cp cut date sed
-3

This backup function preserve the file suffix allowing zsh suffix aliases and desktop default actions to work with the backup file too.

buf () { cp $1{,$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)}; }
2010-12-14 14:02:03
User: unefunge
Functions: cp date
2

1. you don't need to prepend the year with 20 - just use Y instead of y

2. you may want to make your function a bit more secure:

buf () { cp ${1?filename not specified}{,$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S)}; }

buf () { filename=$1; filetime=$(date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S); cp ${filename} ${filename}_${filetime}; }
2010-12-14 13:19:52
User: dopeman
Functions: cp date
1
buf myfile.txt

This is useful when you are making small but frequent changes to a file. It keeps things organised and clear for another administrator to see what changed and at what time. An overview of changes can be deduced using a simple:

ls -ltr
function cp_mp3_to { PID=`pidof audacious2`; FILEPATH=`lsof -p $PID| grep mp3| sed s/[^\/]*//`; cp "$FILEPATH" "$1"; }
2010-12-06 16:31:58
User: ivanatora
Functions: cp grep sed
Tags: copy mp3
1

Maybe it could work for any music player if you change "audacious2" with the string you see in `ps aux` for your player. Needs testing in different systems.