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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
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Commands using cut from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using cut - 491 results
sudo lsof|sed 's/ */ /g'|cut -f3 -d' '|sort -u
2010-07-07 08:20:28
User: binaryten
Functions: cut sed sort sudo

Most systems (at least my macbook) have system users defined, such as _www and using "users" for example will not list them. This command allows you to see who the 'virtual' users are on your system.

ifconfig eth0 | grep -o "inet [^ ]*" | cut -d: -f2
ifconfig eth0 | awk '/inet / {print $2}' | cut -d ':' -f2
ifconfig eth0 | grep "inet " | cut -d ':' -f2 | awk '{print $1}'
2010-06-29 00:06:08
User: jaimerosario
Functions: awk cut grep ifconfig

I've been using it in a script to build from scratch proxy servers.

ifconfig eth0 | grep 'inet addr' | cut -d ':' -f 2 | cut -d ' ' -f 1
2010-06-26 22:36:21
User: atoponce
Functions: cut grep ifconfig
Tags: ifconfig

Simple and easy. No regex, no search and replace. Just clean, built-in tools.

dhclient wlan0 && sbnt=$(ifconfig wlan0 |grep "inet addr" |cut -d ":" -f 2 | cut -d "." -f 1-3) && nmap $sbnt.0/24 -sP
2010-06-22 21:00:29
User: wltj
Functions: cut grep ifconfig

This is helpful if you connect to several networks with different subnets such as 192 networks, 10 networks, etc. Cuts first three octets of ip from ifconfig command and runs nmap ping scan on that subnet.

Replace wlan0 with your interface. Assumes class c network, if class b use: cut -d "." -f 1-2 and change nmap command accordingly.

pvscan | awk '/name_of_vg/ {print $2}' | sed 's/[-|/|]/ /g' | cut -d " " -f7
2010-06-22 16:34:42
User: slashdot
Functions: awk cut sed

This is an easy way to quickly get a status for a device in multipath on SLES systems, as long as the server is configured based on Novell's standards, where multipathed disks are referred to by /dev/disk/by-... tree. Make sure to replace name_of_vg with your Volume Group name.

ps h -o pid,command | grep 'TEXT' | sed 's/^ \+//' | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | xargs -n 1 kill
find ~/Music/iTunes/iTunes\ Media/. -name \*.ipa -exec basename {} \; | cut -d \. -f 1 > ~/Desktop/MyAppList`date +%s.txt`
2010-06-16 15:14:32
User: IsraelTorres
Functions: basename cut find

omit "> ~/Desktop/MyAppList`date +%s.txt`" if you don't want to print it to a file on your desktop and instead only want to display to console

created and tested on:

ProductName: Mac OS X

ProductVersion: 10.6.3

BuildVersion: 10D573

while :;do if [ ! $(ls -l commander |cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then echo "Ran command: $(less commander) @ $(date +%D) $(date +%r)" >> comm_log;"$(less commander)";> commander;fi;done
2010-06-15 01:20:27
User: evil
Functions: cut echo ls

This is a simple solution to running a remote program on a remote computer on the remote display through ssh.

1. Create an empty 'commander' file in the directory where you intend on running these commands.

2. Run the command

3. Hop on another computer and ssh in to the PC where you ran the command

4. cd to the directory where the 'commander' file is.

5. Test it by doing the following: echo "xeyes" > commander

6. If it worked properly, then xeyes will popup on the remote computer.

Combined with my other one liner, you can place those in some start-up scripts and be able to screw with your wife/daughter/siblings, w/e by either launching programs or sending notifications(my other one liner).

Also, creates a log file named comm_log in working directory that logs all commands ran.

while : ; do if [ ! $(ls -l commander | cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then notify-send "$(less commander)"; > commander; fi; done
2010-06-13 18:45:02
User: evil
Functions: cut ls

Run this command when you are physically at the computer you wish to send pop-up messages to. Then when you ssh in to it, you can do this: echo "guess who?" > commander

guess who? will then pop up on the screen for a few moments, then disappear. You will need to create the commander file first. I mess with my wife all the time with this. i.e. echo "You have given the computer a virus. Computer will be rendered useless in 10 seconds." > commander


curl -s "http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/language/translate?langpair=|en&v=1.0&q=`xsel`" |cut -d \" -f 6
wget -qO - "http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/language/translate?langpair=|zh-cn&v=1.0&q=`xsel`" |cut -d \" -f 6
wget -qO - "http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/language/translate?langpair=|en&v=1.0&q=`xsel`" |cut -d \" -f 6
2010-06-04 17:20:17
User: fain182
Functions: cut wget

Uses google api to translate, you can modify the language in which translate modifying the parameter "langpair=|en", the format is language input|language output.

xrandr | grep \* | cut -d' ' -f4
H=$(until ([ $i -le 6 -a $i -gt 0 -o $i -le 23 -a $i -gt 21 ] ); do i=$(date +%N | cut -c8-10); done ; echo $i) ; M=$(until [ $i -le 59 ]; do i=$(date +%N | cut -c8-10); done ; echo $i) ; echo $M $H \* \* \* backup-rsync-push.sh
declare -F | cut -d ' ' -f 3
tune2fs -l $(df -P / | tail -n1 | cut -d' ' -f1 ) | grep 'Filesystem created:'
while [ 1 -lt 2 ]; do i=0; COL=$((RANDOM%$(tput cols)));ROW=$((RANDOM%$(tput cols)));while [ $i -lt $COL ]; do tput cup $i $ROW;echo -e "\033[1;34m" $(cat /dev/urandom | head -1 | cut -c1-1) 2>/dev/null ; i=$(expr $i + 1); done; done
2010-05-28 16:07:56
User: dave1010
Functions: cat cut expr head tput

Same as original, but works in bash

while :; do integer i=0; COL=$((RANDOM%$(tput cols))); ROW=$((RANDOM%$(tput cols))); while (( i <= COL)) do tput cup $i $ROW; echo "\033[1;34m" $(cat /dev/urandom | head -1 | cut -c1-1) 2>/dev/null; i=$(expr $i + 1); done done
logfile=/var/log/gputemp.log; timestamp=$( date +%T );temps=$(nvidia-smi -lsa | grep Temperature | awk -F: ' { print $2 } '| cut -c2-4 | tr "\n" " ");echo "${timestamp} ${temps}" >> ${logfile}
say='festival --tts'; S=$(date +%s); echo $(echo $S | cut -b 1-1)" billion" | $say ; echo $(echo $S | cut -b 2-4 | sed 's/0*//')" million"| $say; echo $(echo $S | cut -b 5-7 | sed 's/0*//')" thousand"| $say
2010-05-28 09:19:24
User: rubo77
Functions: cut date echo sed

you will hear how many seconds since 1.1.1970 in english words with billions, millions and thousands.

this is very useful, if you want to get over to use the unixtimestamp instead of the 24 hour clock in your dayly life

cut -d'/' -f3 file | sort | uniq -c
2010-05-23 16:02:51
User: rubenmoran
Functions: cut file sort uniq

count the times a domain appears on a file which lines are URLs in the form http://domain/resource.

grep -R usepackage * | cut -d']' -f2 | cut -s -d'{' -f 2 | sed s/"}"/.sty"}"/g | cut -d'}' -f1 | sort | uniq | xargs dpkg -S | cut -d':' -f1 | sort | uniq
for i in $(find ~/.config/chromium/*/Extensions -name 'manifest.json'); do n=$(grep -hIr name $i| cut -f4 -d '"'| sort);u="https://chrome.google.com/extensions/detail/";ue=$(basename $(dirname $(dirname $i))); echo -e "$n:\n$u$ue\n" ; done
2010-05-18 15:16:36
User: new_user
Functions: cut find grep

Gives you a list for all installed chrome (chromium) extensions with URL to the page of the extension.

With this you can easy add a new Bookmark folder called "extensions" add every URL to that folder, so it will be synced and you can access the names from every computer you are logged in.


Only tested with chromium, for chrome you maybe have to change the find $PATH.