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Commands using date from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using date - 161 results
tar --create --file /path/$HOSTNAME-my_name_file-$(date -I).tar.gz --atime-preserve -p -P --same-owner -z /path/
2009-09-07 04:52:12
User: Odin_sv
Functions: date tar
Tags: backup tar
1

Use tar command for a backup info with a date of creation

date -d @1234567890
date -j -v +1000000000S -f %m%d%Y mmddYYYY
date -j -v +1000000000S -f %m%d%Y mmddyyyy
date -d12/31/1970+1000000000sec
curl http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/by/<your username>/rss|gzip ->commandlinefu-contribs-backup-$(date +%Y-%m-%d-%H.%M.%S).rss.gz
2009-08-10 12:43:33
Functions: date gzip
10

Use `zless` to read the content of your *rss.gz file:

zless commandlinefu-contribs-backup-2009-08-10-07.40.39.rss.gz
FECHA=$(date +"%F") FINAL="$FECHA.sql.gz" mysqldump -h localhost -u user --password="pass" --opt jdiaz61_lupajuridica | gzip > /home/jdiaz61/www/backup/$FINAL
2009-08-09 14:51:46
User: juancabo
Functions: date gzip
-2

Tres lineas en un shell script para copiar la base de datos diaramente

let utime=$offsetutc*3600+$(date --utc +%s)+3600; date --utc --date=@${utime}
2009-08-07 23:12:14
User: flokra
Functions: date
0

prints out the time for the timezone specified in $offsetutc. So you have less to think about things like: "I'm in utc+4 and my friend in utc-7, can I call him now or will I wake him?"

Note: $offsetutc should be an integer between -12 and 12.

cp path/filename{,-$(date +%Y-%m-%d)}
2009-08-06 13:50:00
User: vutcovici
Functions: cp date
1

It will create a backup of the filename. The advantage is that if you list the folder the backups will be sorted by date. The command works on any unix in bash.

date --date="$(openssl x509 -in xxxxxx.crt -noout -startdate | cut -d= -f 2)" --iso-8601
2009-07-23 23:24:33
User: rez0r
Functions: date
1

A quick and simple way of outputting the start and end date of a certificate, you can simply use 'openssl x509 -in xxxxxx.crt -noout -enddate' to output the end date (ex. notAfter=Feb 01 11:30:32 2009 GMT) and with the date command you format the output to an ISO format.

For the start date use the switch -startdate and for end date use -enddate.

mysqldump [options] |gzip ->mysqldump-$(date +%Y-%m-%d-%H.%M.%S).gz
2009-06-12 12:42:59
Functions: date gzip
1

Performs a mysqldump and gzip-compresses the output file with a timestamp in the resulting dump file. Inspect the file for integrity or fun with this command afterward, if you desire:

zcat mysqldump-2009-06-12-07.41.01.tgz | less
date -d '1 day ago'; date -d '11 hour ago'; date -d '2 hour ago - 3 minute'; date -d '16 hour'
2009-06-01 10:41:56
User: LrdShaper
Functions: date
5

With this command you can get a previous or future date or time. Where can you use this? How about finding all files modified or created in the last 5 mins?

touch -t `echo $(date -d "5 minute ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type f -newer me

List all directories created since last week?

touch -t `echo $(date -d "1 week ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type d -cnewer me

I'm sure you can think of more ways to use it. Requires coreutils package.

date -d2009-05-18 > /dev/null 2>&1 ; echo $?
2009-05-18 20:30:05
User: GeckoDH
Functions: date echo
2

Important to know: a valid date will return 0, otherwise 1!

date -d '2 weeks ago'
2009-04-28 03:09:23
User: Buzzcp
Functions: date
5

Use date to find the date at other days and times.

mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)
2009-04-25 14:16:45
User: thebodzio
Functions: date mkdir
Tags: alias date mkdir
11

Not a discovery but a useful one nontheless.

In the above example date format is 'yyyymmdd'. For other possible formats see 'man date'.

This command can be also very convenient when aliased to some meaningful name:

alias mkdd='mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)'
date -r foo
date -d@1234567890
2009-04-11 22:26:41
User: kFiddle
Functions: date
Tags: date
46

This example, for example, produces the output, "Fri Feb 13 15:26:30 EST 2009"

tar -czvvf backup$(date "+%Y%m%d_%H%M%S").tar.gz /path/to/dir
2009-04-10 21:37:17
Functions: date tar
5

creates a tar.gz with a name like:

backup20090410_173053.tar.gz

of a given directory.

this file was made 10 April 2009 at 5:30:53pm

see date's man page to customize the timestamp format

echo $( (( $( (2**31 -1) ) - $(date +%s) )) )
2009-04-02 05:14:23
User: Chartreuse
Functions: date echo
Tags: bash echo date
0

Echos the number of seconds from the current time till the specified time (Example in command is (2**31-1)) aka the Unix epoch. Just replace that number with the specified date (in seconds past Jan. 1st 1970) and it will return the seconds.

NOTE: Only works in bash

date +%m/%d/%y%X|tr -d 'n' >>datemp.log&& sensors|grep +5V|cut -d "(" -f1|tr -d 'n'>> datemp.log && sensors |grep Temp |cut -d "(" -f1|tr -d 'n'>>datemp.log
2009-03-31 18:13:23
User: f241vc15
Functions: cut date grep sensors tr
0
cat datemp.log

04/01/0902:11:42

Sys Temp: +11.0?C

CPU Temp: +35.5?C

AUX Temp: +3.0?C

date -d @$(echo $((2 ** 31 - 1)))
2009-03-30 19:42:20
User: jnash
Functions: date echo
1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_2038_problem

Some other notable dates that have passed:

date -d@1234567890 date -d@1000000000
date -d "@$(find dir -type f -printf '%C@\n' | sort -n | sed -n "$(($(find dir -type f | wc -l)/2))p")" +%F
2009-03-24 18:48:49
User: allengarvin
Functions: date dir find wc
-1

I needed to get a feel for how "old" different websites were, based on their directories.

date --date=yesterday
vi ~/journal/$(date +%F)
2009-03-18 23:31:13
User: ar
Functions: date vi
1

prerequisite:

mkdir ~/journal
date --iso
2009-02-25 23:50:40
User: raphink
Functions: date
0

Useful to archive files once a day:

cp file file.$(date --iso)