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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
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Commands using du from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using du - 208 results
du -k | sort -n | perl -ne 'if ( /^(\d+)\s+(.*$)/){$l=log($1+.1);$m=int($l/log(1024)); printf ("%6.1f\t%s\t%25s %s\n",($1/(2**(10*$m))),(("K","M","G","T","P")[$m]),"*"x (1.5*$l),$2);}' | more
2012-02-07 15:49:19
User: Q_Element
Functions: du perl printf sort

This one line Perl script will display the smallest to the largest files sizes in all directories on a server.

du --max-depth=1 | sort -nr | awk ' BEGIN { split("KB,MB,GB,TB", Units, ","); } { u = 1; while ($1 >= 1024) { $1 = $1 / 1024; u += 1 } $1 = sprintf("%.1f %s", $1, Units[u]); print $0; } '
du -sch *
2011-12-06 18:38:20
User: anarcat
Functions: du
Tags: space du disk

All folders, human-readable, no subfolder, with a total. Even shorter.

t=$(df|awk 'NR!=1{sum+=$2}END{print sum}');sudo du / --max-depth=1|sed '$d'|sort -rn -k1 | awk -v t=$t 'OFMT="%d" {M=64; for (a=0;a<$1;a++){if (a>c){c=a}}br=a/c;b=M*br;for(x=0;x<b;x++){printf "\033[1;31m" "|" "\033[0m"}print " "$2" "(a/t*100)"% total"}'
2011-12-01 01:21:11
User: kevinquinnyo
Functions: awk du sed sort sudo

i'm using gawk, you may get varying mileage with other varieties. You might want to change the / after du to say, /home/ or /var or something, otherwise this command might take quite some time to complete. Sorry it's so obsfucated, I had to turn a script into a one-liner under 255 characters for commandlinefu. Note: the bar ratio is relative, so the highest ratio of the total disk, "anchors" the rest of the graph. EDIT: the math was slightly wrong, fixed it. Also, made it compliant with older versions of df.

du -sh * | sort -rh | head
2011-11-16 06:01:02
User: sirex
Functions: du sort
Tags: du

This command simply outputs 10 files in human readable, that takes most space on your disk in current directory.

du -h --max-depth=1 |sort -rh
2011-11-15 20:30:00
User: jambino
Functions: du sort

In this case I'm just grabbing the next level of subdirectories (and same level regular files) with the --max-depth=1 flag. leaving out that flag will just give you finer resolution. Note that you have to use the -h switch with both 'du' and with 'sort.'

du -h | sort -hr
du -sh *
du -sh `pwd`
2011-10-30 08:47:23
User: djkee
Functions: du
Tags: size du pwd

Shows the size of the directory the command is ran in.

The size is in MB and GB.

There is no need to type the path, its the current working directory.

du -h /path | sort -h
parallel echo -n {}"\ "\;echo '$(du -s {} | awk "{print \$1}") / $(find {} | wc -l)' \| bc -l ::: *
du -h / | grep -w "[0-9]*G"
find /myfs -size +209715200c -exec du -m {} \; |sort -nr |head -10
2011-07-07 21:12:46
User: arlequin
Functions: du find head sort

Specify the size in bytes using the 'c' option for the -size flag. The + sign reads as "bigger than". Then execute du on the list; sort in reverse mode and show the first 10 occurrences.

SEARCHPATH=/var/; find $SEARCHPATH -type d -print0 | xargs -0 du -s 2> /dev/null | sort -nr | sed 's|^.*'$SEARCHPATH'|'$SEARCHPATH'|' | xargs du -sh 2> /dev/null
2011-07-06 08:21:58
User: moogmusic
Functions: du find sed sort xargs

This command lists all the directories in SEARCHPATH by size, displaying their size in a human readable format.

du -scb
2011-06-27 14:20:11
User: bbbco
Functions: du
Tags: du

Even simpler! Use du ... the -s and -c flags summarize and print a grand total of all files recursively. The -b flag prints in byte format. You can use the -h flag instead to print in human readable format.

du -kh --max-depth=1 | sort -n |head
du --max-depth=1 -B M |sort -rn
2011-04-12 15:01:12
Functions: du sort
Tags: bash du sh

If you're only using -m or -k, you will need to remember they are either in Megabyte or kilobyte forms. So by using -B, it gives you the unit of the size measurement, which helps you from reading the result faster. You can try with -B K as well.

du -h --max-depth=1 | sort -hr
2011-04-07 18:01:18
User: splante
Functions: du sort
Tags: sort du

Credit goes to brun65i but he posted it as a comment instead as an alternative. I hadn't noticed the -h option on sort before and this seems like the cleanest alternative. Thanks Brun65i!

find . -name '*.xml' -type f -print | xargs du -ch
2011-03-22 00:47:42
User: nathwill
Functions: du find xargs
Tags: find du type

print sum of disk usage for filetype within current dir and subdirs

find . -size +100000k -exec du -h {} \;
find -type f -exec du -sh {} + | sort -rh | head
find -type f | xargs -I{} du -s "{}" | sort -rn | head | cut -f2 | xargs -I{} du -sh "{}"
2011-01-04 11:10:56
User: glaudiston
Functions: cut du find head sort xargs

Show the top file size in human readable form

find -type f | xargs -I{} du -sk "{}" | sort -rn | head